- Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 08-13-2003
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 172
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
JeffC_ is on a distinguished road
I''m an English teacher in a public school. I may be able to add a bit of light here.

I agree with Stede. Some very smart young people just don''t fit well in a traditional school setting.
And saying that is not an excuse for quitting-for-quitting''s-sake. Others in this thread have pointed out the unalterable truth that the ability to endure unpleasant tasks, to perservere through difficult situations, and to delay your gratification builds the essential character trait of maturity that replaces the impulsiveness and selfishness of childhood and yields the kind of adults that we all want in a civilized world. I will summarize that sentiment as "You will discover that life is hard; and people without <em>some kind</em> of education don''t advance as far, as a rule, as those who have one." That idea is well-received, and can be counted as <u>Wisdom that All Young People Should Heed</u>.

Having said all that, Stede is also right when he stresses that (given that you are adamant about leaving the public schools, and just as adamant about cruising to far places) learning a trade (which I submit <u>is</u> a <em>kind</em> of eduction) that will be in demand in the cruising community will be essential, and diesel and refrigeration skills top the list. I''m sure that if Robin Lee Graham had those skills, he wouldn''t have had to dig through a trash heap for a pair of boots that would allow him to work at the power plant in Darwin just to finance the next leg of his circumnavigation. Working with tools and skills is better than working with back and arms.<p><em>By the way, get a copy of his book, </em>Dove,<em> which is still a classic for young sailors filled with wanderlust.<p></em>It''s also been expressed in this thread that many young people who are frustrated in school discover that they are actually capable students once they are learning something they have a <em>reason</em> to learn. Motivation is a powerful conditioner of behavior.<p>In concert with your parents and your counselor, you might aim at the completetion of the GED diploma. If this is going to be your senior year, and you are very far behind in credits, using this year preparing for the GED exam may be more productive than trying to make up credits toward a conventional HS diploma. Everyone''s situation is unique, but approaching your folks with a well thought-out plan that they can see the reason in could be a good first step.

Good Luck to you.
Jeff
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 08-13-2003
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 360
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
928frenzy is on a distinguished road
As I told my kids when they were thinking of dropping-out: "Go ahead, the world needs ditch-diggers too."

As it turned out, my oldest did, but within four months she was attending evening classes to get her GED. She now admits, mom and dad were right when we told her how tough it was to live without a HS diploma. Heck, it''s not much easier with one, but at least it can get you a decent job, from which you might be able to move upward.

Like you, she didn''t care for the school structure and she didn''t like many of her teachers. However, she soon found out that the "school of hard-knocks" had even worse teachers, and the care-free (do it at your own pace) structure was hard to continue for an extended period of time. As it turns out, she finally settled down (grew up) and earned her GED and then a BA.

Hopefully, you too will grow up. However, if not, be prepared to do menial jobs (like cleaning out holding tanks, scrubbing and painting boat bottoms, and other jobs that aren''t particularly challenging) for a very long time, or at least till a younger dummy comes along. Be careful, cause he/she may replace you, and you may not even get hired for the lousy jobs you did before.

No one said getting an education is easy. Also, no one said good jobs are easy to find. Ever wonder why the good jobs usually get taken by folks with an education? It''s usually because they''ve proved they could stick it out to get that higher education. That usually translates to "They have proved worthy of holding the better (high-paying) job." Whether that true or not doesn''t matter. That what most employers think, and that''s what really matters.

Back when I was in the Navy, I saw lots of poorly educated folks working on the ship. They were hard working guys without which the Navy would come to an abrupt halt. As hard working as they were, they were kept busy doing menial work and were never asked to make meaniful decisions. That was probably fine by them, as they probably didn''t think they could anyway. They were happy to be getting three squares a day, and a place to sleep. For them, what more was there to life? As the saying goes, "Ignorance is bliss."

Well it sounds like you currently think "Ignorance is bliss." I hope for your sake it will be true. However, I sorry to tell you, but the odds are stacked way against you. In any event, I wish you the best of luck - cause (IMO) you''ll need it.

~ Happy sails to you ~ _/) ~
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 08-14-2003
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 53
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
DonFoley is on a distinguished road
Hindsight has told me that school is more about classes and grades. It''s also a time to begin to develop more sophisticated interpersonal and communication skills. It''s a time to mature as well.

This isn''t something that can be rushed, and it is something that will affect you, for better or worse, for the rest of your life.

Finish HS or the GED. How old will you be three years from now if you don''t (hint: same age as if you do, but without the diploma).
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 08-14-2003
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 172
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
JeffC_ is on a distinguished road
Lest anyone suspect otherwise, I <em>can</em> spell "education"…
(Even English teachers make typos) =:0
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 08-14-2003
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 172
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
JeffC_ is on a distinguished road
Lest anyone suspect otherwise, I <em>can</em> spell "education"…
(Even English teachers make typos) =:0
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 08-14-2003
pirateofcapeann's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Gloucester, Mass. USA
Posts: 373
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 12
pirateofcapeann is on a distinguished road
You can say that again!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 08-14-2003
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 55
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
thefantasea is on a distinguished road
Author: Jeffamc
I plan on dropping out of high school very soon and then I will get a full time job and just save up until I get afford a sailboat, but the only problem is once i get a sailboat and I am living on it, how will I make money for food, water, repairs, docking, gas, ect. Anyone have any suggestions?
_____________________________________________

If you consider what you have to offer to an employer in the way of useful skills, how much do you think an employer would be willing to pay for those skills?

When you consider your costs to do the job; clothes, travel, meals, tools, etc., how much money do you expect to bring home?

After you meet your living expenses, how much will be left over to save for your boat? How many years will it take for you to accumulate $5,000? $10,000? $20,000?

On his twenty-fifth birthday, every young man looks into the mirror and sees his reflection, and a lot more. He also sees what he has accomplished in his life. At this point, many young men smile and say, "I''m off to a great start and my future is looking good." Too many others scowl and complain that life is tough and they can''t get a break. They realize that the decisions they made have hurt them in so many ways, but they try to shift the blame elsewhere -- their parents were at fault, the schools were no good, the teachers didn''t care, the guys they hung out with were just losers. But the world knows where th blame lies.

To a great extent, the only thing that separates these two groups is their level of education.

By this time, all are pretty much set in their ways and won''t change. And neither will the road to their future.

Forget, for a moment, where you are now and ask yourself where you would want to be at age 25. If you will be content to remain on the lowest rungs of the economic ladder with little hope of rising, then do exactly what you wrote in your post. If, on the other hand, you want more than that, then you have to prepare yourself for it.

You cannot possibly know how difficult life is for folks who are undereducated. As someone once observed, "Every day, it gets tougher to make a buck."

Do yourself a favor. Look around and see the difference between those who took education seriously and those who didn''t. Then get off your butt, get the lead out, stop moaning, and start taking education seriously.

As someone already pointed out, no matter how you slice it, three years from now, you''ll be 21 without a diploma. With the right kind of effort, you could be 21 with a diploma.

You must have noticed that no one has supported your decision to deliberately become less than you can be. In different ways, everyone has encouraged you to be the best that you can be.

Look around. Are those who make it through high school any better than you? Do you really think that you are inferior to them?

Remember, you''re the one who makes the decisions that effect your life.

Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 08-19-2003
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 224
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
flicker is on a distinguished road
Jeffamc,

I think you are very lucky. You have gotten some EXCELLENT advice from every one who has answered you. Stay in school, if possible, or learn a good trade: electrician, plumber, diesel mechanic. I''m in middle-age now and and have seen friends say things just like you have.

Some of them have gotten their act together, gone to school, worked hard and worked their way up. I don''t know anyone who can''t say that they wish they had gotten a better education. These people worked very, very hard to get to the point in life where they can enjoy the prosperity that most people do enjoy in this country; a car, a house, a wife and kids--well-fed and happy, TVs, CD players, backyards.

Others have rebelled at the system and gotten angry when they find themselves at 45 years old and can''t afford to keep their cars running and no one wants to help them because they tired of bailing out someone who refuses to manage his own life properly.

You said, "I read books on my own, i dont like being dictated opon by some lady or some facist." I know what you''re saying, but life in a port has more to do with obeying authority that you may think. If this country is tough, remember that out there governments can be very fickle towards you and very uncaring and very, very corrupt. And if you even begin to consider relying on criminal behavior, such as smuggling, as an acceptable means of keeping your life of freedom on the water, you must know up front that you may have to pay a penalty far greater than being dictated upon by some lady or facist. Many countries are very big on prisons and have no public defenders office.

Don''t waste you chances at a life of happiness. Stay in school, or at least get a good trade. You''ll be happy you did.

Best of fortunes to you,
Chas
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 08-20-2003
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 18
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
dagerman is on a distinguished road
Jeffamc

I''m sure I dropped out of high school for the same reasons you are. You are not challenged by the classes, you have a counselor that is advising you to do things that don''t make sense... But I also spent 10 years trying to catch up to my peers. At almost 40 years old I have achieved the level of accomplishment that I would have at 30. I know you don''t want to hear it, but suck it up, stay in school and then re-evaluate. You''ll look back 20 years from now and realize how easy it was.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 08-21-2003
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 9
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
JoeNJayne is on a distinguished road
to. thefantasea


well said..

thats all I have to add...

J & J
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:52 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012