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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum
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  #31  
Old 08-23-2003
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Seagypsywoman is on a distinguished road
Jeff,
Mark Twain said, "Don''t let schooling get in the way of your education."
I know a man who dropped out of college at 21 and has never looked back. He is now 43, and still traveling. He''s been around the world six times on boats and by a Land Rover. He''s lived with the Eskimos and the Mayans. He left home with $50 I think, hitchhiked, slept in ditches for awhile, and sometimes had been extremely lucky that he didn''t get picked up by some pervert and killed.
He has NO regrets. For money, he''s driven trucks and buses, he''s worked on large farm machinery, picked fruit and bought and sold cars to make a profit. He buys whatever he can afford really cheap and then sells it when he can get more money for it. (NOT DRUGS).
My advice is: follow your heart and do what you want to. You can always change your mind.
If you can make your way to La Paz, Mexico you can live on my sailboat there in exchange for keeping it clean and varnished until she sells, which could be months or years. I''m not there, but lots of my friends are. I will tell them about you, they will help you. You don''t have to work illegaly, just trade your skills for food. All you need is a place to live and food. Good luck. You will one day inspire others as your contribution to the world. The world needs more people like you.
Barb
By the way, I wish I had the guts to do what you''re wanting to do at your age and didn''t waste my life sitting in school and joining the rat-race. I am now still sailing, varnishing boats, sewing and writing to support my lifestyle.
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  #32  
Old 08-23-2003
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Thanks Seagypsywoman, you seem to be the first person that does not think that without a high school diaploma you are nothing, thats just an illusion that many people have, yea mabey u cant get into the army, marines, ect but who wants to do that ****, I really do not care alot about a good job, minimum wage is about $6.70/hr, so if u work enough for a few years, can get a good sailboat. Life is alot eaiser then parents, teachers, other forms of authority try to make it sound. My parents are always saying, you must finish high school and go to college so that you will be able to get a nice house, car in your life. But I dont really care about "nice" cars, houses ect, just so long as i am still alive, i will be fine. I dont care to have a Ferrari and everyday drive by all the homeless people. The class system, government, countries, wars, ect are all just huge illusions that are apart of this society that is just a delisuion.
hmmm sorry to sound like some preacher
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  #33  
Old 08-23-2003
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Consider Albin Vega 27 for a boat that has a great reputation, and also Alberg 30 is sort of an enlarged Folkboat with standing headroom if you are under 6 feet tall, but made of fibreglass.
You should be able to buy either of them for under $20k or less if you get one that needs a lot of work, but then you have to do the work and spend the money to fix and replace all the things that need to be repaired or upgraded for offshore work. Expect to spend around $5000 to $10,000 for that work and gear for your cruise. Plan on $1000 for a used inflatable and outboat and learn to rebuild that outboard. You will need it when you are cruising. I roll mine up and stow it in my quarter berth so I don''t have to drag it or try walking around it on deck.

I lived in Connecticut in the seventies and I remember it was pretty cold in the winter and everyone hauled their boats out. I bet you can live on it in the summer if the marina allows it, but I bet no yard will let you in the winter, so I hope you can live at home or whereever you are now until you are nearly ready to go. I don''t know what moorage rates are on the east coast, but on the west coast in Washington, you will pay around $160 to $300 per month for a 30 foot slip plus electricity and a liveaboard fee if they have one.

If you can go sailing before you buy the boat definately do that as much as possible. Look for a boat somewhere where you could live on it year around so you can do all the work it needs and save money. I don''t know, but would guess that might be from the Chesapeake Bay area on down to Florida. You can get a job in that area and stay on the boat.

If you can stick to your plan and save money, it will be great and I will admire your focus and you will have lots of fun. It will be hard work, but working for what you want is fun. I would also suggest getting the GED somewhere along the line. I have some friends that dropped out and all eventually did go and get the GED.

Ken
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  #34  
Old 08-24-2003
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With all due respect the Alberg 30 is the antithesis of a Folkboat in almost everyway. The Folkboat began like as an offshore cruiser that could be raced. The Alberg 30 started life as a CCA era racing rule beater. This had enormous impact on the design of the two boats.

The Folkboat (at least in its original form) had an easy to single hand fractional rig (or a small jib big mainsail proportion on the later masthead rigged versions), and a very easily driven hull with a long waterline. The Folkboats were quite light for their day (4200-4700 lbs), have a nearly 50% ballast ratio and have a narrow beam. This results in a very easily driven hull and that easily driven hull really makes sense in a blow offshore where you can snug down to an hankerchief and still make good progress to windward. Folkboats have outboard rudders which allow the use of reliable, inexpensive, easily to home build, trimtab servo type windvanes. The Folkboats have about as large a range of positive stability as can be concieved of (generally quoted in the 160 degree range.) Their narrow waterline and nearly full length keel means that they track very well but my experience with these wonderful boats if that their generous rudder size allows them to be quite maneuverable as well and makes them capable of be cruised without an engine. But all of that sweetness comes with the price that they are cramped down below, a tiny cockpit, and have comparatively small carrying capacities.

On the other hand, as a result of the CCA racing rule, Alberg has an exceptionally short waterline and a rig that depends on huge foresails. Neither of these are good characteristics for offshore cruising. They tend to hobbyhorse and get stopped dead in a chop. By comparison, the Alberg sailing on a typically quoted 8" longer waterline length than a Folkboat is nearly twice the weight (9200 lbs) and but has only 400 lbs more ballast. It is 25% beamier, and by the classic definition of a fin keel, is a fin keeled boat with an attached rudder. The A30''s less than easily driven hull when combined with the comparatively low ballast ratio makes these harder boats to sail in a blow. On the other hand they are more tollerant of carrying a lot more ''stuff''. With their poor tracking ability, and comparatively large weather helm, they require a powerful manufactured windvane or an electronic autopilot. Albergs do have much larger interiors and cockpits. because they are still raced in places like the Chesapeake, you can sometimes find perfectly serviceable used sails that are fine for cruising but no longer suitable for the race course.

The Alberg in racing form, with large crews are typically 15 to 21 seconds a mile faster but in cruising form without the wieght of a large crew on the A30''s rail, the Folkboat should offer pretty similar performance.

These boats really represent two extremely different approaches to cruising and all that they share in common is that they are both old designs (although the Folkboat design is 20 years older than the Alberg)

Respectfully,
Jeff
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  #35  
Old 08-24-2003
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There are a lot of Folkboats around the San Francisco area and they sell around $10k to $15k and most are masthead rigged. People like it there for its ability to carry sail in wind. I think the PHRF is 228 with an outboard and the A30 is 220. I am not a fan of long overhangs, but in a lot of 60''s and earlier boats, thats what you get.
The Alberg 30''s in the $15k range sometimes have gas engines which I also don''t like. A boat in my marina blew up last week when the owner turned on a shopvac in his bilge.

I understood that a group of Folkboat owners commisioned Alberg to design the Alberg 30 and some 900 were built. I see them listed with a waterline of 21''8" compared to the Folkboat listed at 19''8", but I don''t know how accurate that is. I believe "Practical Sailor" had a review of the A30 also.

They are just 2 of the hundreds or thousands of boats that people have sailed around the world in and can be bought for less than a kings ransom.

Ken
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  #36  
Old 08-25-2003
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It is my understanding that Henry Walton (H. Walton and Company)of Annapolis approached Alberg and Whitby about producing a 30 foot CCA race boat and the result was the Alberg 30. Henry was a boat importer who had boats built to his specifications in Canada and Holland. Henry also imported a neat version of a modified Folkboat that had a small doghouse in addition to the trunk cabin. (One of these just sold for $3,500 in Annapolis with a diesel engine.) I believe that the story that the Alberg 30 was initiated by a group of Folkboat owners emerged from the fact that Henry Walton was already importing Folkboats.

Jeff
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  #37  
Old 08-25-2003
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That is one thing that always bugs me. Boats here seem to always list and sell for more than boats in other places. I have a theory or two as to why, but I could be completely wrong.

I got that information about Folkboat owners and Alberg from a book by John Vigor, so I don''t know anything about its accuraccy myself.

Ken
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  #38  
Old 08-28-2003
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In this day and age, anybody who has the ability to get an education, and doesn''t do it, is a frigin IDIOT!

FINISH SCHOOL! The three or so years you may have to put your inflated ego on hold, will be the best investment you can make in yourself

M Murphy
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  #39  
Old 08-28-2003
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Dear Jeff A. Mc(whoever you are):

I am not going to tell you to stay in school. You can learn about life and about yourself and about the world in other ways.

I am going to recommend that you consider taking a job on a sailing vessel. That way, you can earn the low pay and work the long hours you would enjoy at KFC, but will be doing it in an environment where you can learn a lot. You can learn, for example, whether you are really cut out to be a sailor. You can learn what is really involved in sailing/cruising. Not just the romantic stuff, but the practical stuff, like navigation, maintenance, cooking, and cleaning out the head when it jambs.

If you really are serious about wanting to sail for life, here''s your challenge. Contact one of these outfits (or ask around for other suggested boats) and apply for an opening level position. There are many applicants and few slots available, but you will have the advantage (since you are leaving school) of being available for a full cruising season instead of just summer vacation.

http://www.schooneryacht.com/help.html

http://www.mysticwhaler.com/crew_positions.htm

http://www.mainewindjammercruises.com/joincrew.cfm

BE FOREWARNED: The men and women who captain these ships are engaged in a serious business, and they are not likely to suffer fools gladly. They are usually willing to share their knowledge and experience with apprentices who have a true desire to become sailors (not just pipe dream sailors), but if you are a goof-off, cocksure, or lazy shirker type, they will put you ashore with bus fare home at the first opportunity.

Live long, and prosper.

Allen Flanigan
Alexandria, VA
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  #40  
Old 08-28-2003
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That is absolutley the coolest thing I''ve ever seen. Are you familiar with anything like this on the West coast? Thank you very much.

-- James
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