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  #1  
Old 08-16-2003
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JoeNJayne is on a distinguished road
Full Keel Cruising... legs ?

Hi All.

Jayne and I are soon to be cruisers (Hopefully) I have to retire from work so funds are now available, however, in the search for the ''home'', we have decided on a full, long keel boat.

There are a few things that concern us..

Beaching for scrubbing, painting, repairs, inspections etc..

Going aground (Stability)

For the above 2, do you carry ''legs'' ?? or what do you do ??... I would love the ability to selectively beach without worrying about a lift-out...

Bahamas ??.. we would love to visit the Bahamas some day (we are UK Based).. I keep reading about thin water and shoal draft ''needed'' ??, with a draft of, say, 6 feet... is it possible ?? and practical. ??

Thanks all.

Joe / Jayne.. UK
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Old 08-17-2003
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Full Keel Cruising... legs ?

Legs depend a bit on whether you have a place you can put them when you''re not using them. People usually tie up to a bulkhead to work on their boats, however, so that accees to the boat is easier. (Otherwise you need a LONG ladder to get back aboard, so you have to stow that, along with the legs.) Grounding out to work on the bottom will also depend on the range of tide where you''re sailing. If you''ve got a 6'' draft, you''ll need 7'' of tide to work on it all. (And that leaves about twenty minutes for the paint to dry before the water comes back...) IMHO that the tidal range in the Bahamas and some other areas isn''t that big - better check. Another issue is pollution. Depending upon where you are, there can be hefty fines for leaving anti-fouling paint dust, chips or drips on a beach or in the water. Nothing''s ever as simple as it seems.
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Old 08-17-2003
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camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
Full Keel Cruising... legs ?

I''d suggest that lift outs or railways are the most practical way to go for cruising in the islands where tidal range is nothing like that of merry old england (or our New England!).
As to draft...6 feet is fine for the Bahamas but you will have to wait for the tide to get into some places. I cruised with 5.5 feet of draft and had plenty of room to spare most everywhere.
Best...GB
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Old 08-19-2003
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Full Keel Cruising... legs ?

Hi Joe ''n'' Jayne!

I agree with PaulK''s comment about what you would need if you wanted to "freestand" the boat to work on her. Also, like he said, tidal ranges in many of the cruising areas on the US East Coast aren''t enough to allow you to work on the boat.

On the Central American Pacific coast, there were a number of spots where people "careened" their boats, which, as Paul mentioned, meant tying securely to a dock and allowing the tide to recede. Along that coast the tidal range was 10 feet or more, so there was time to work on the boat before the water began creeping in again.

This type of activity is really only needed on the same schedule as you are hauling out now (once a year or so???). For regular bottom cleaning, you can go over the side (hopefully in clear, clean water) with tanks or hookah rig, scraper in hand, and do it that way....or find someone in the cruising fleet who''ll do it for you.

Look forward to seeing you out here!!!

Trish Lambert
trish@takehersailing.com
www.takehersailing.com
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Old 08-19-2003
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Full Keel Cruising... legs ?

Trish (or anyone),
I know that letting your boat roll onto her beam as the tide recedes so that she''s completely on her side known as careening; but does the term also apply to using a wall? This is a new use of the term for me.

Just Curious,
Jeff
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Old 08-21-2003
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JoeNJayne is on a distinguished road
Full Keel Cruising... legs ?

Hiya Jeff.

I must admit, ''Careening'' was always ''pulling down by FORCE... pulleys or barrel ''o'' water.. in my perception.. I remember years ago (1970''s - Isles of Scilly UK) watching the froggies dry out at the quayside... a few lines ashore at various heights made it a safer and more ''enjoyable'' experience... :-)

Joe
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Old 09-16-2003
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Full Keel Cruising... legs ?

Hey guys you have the right idea but play it by ear.

Six feet of draft isn''t that much and with a full keel depending on the bottom they will stand on their own. Round the world yachties have been know to take "legs" but you may find you never need them depending on where you go and how you maintain your boat. The posts about pulling up anywhere and doing all the business are right - there are restrictions - and you may not want to do it that way. Especially if you are retiring and have any age on you. Hey that''s what we saved all that money for - so that others could do all the hard work.

Sounds like you are getting it together but remember there is no substitute for experience and while that doesn''t mean you have to learn the hard way, it likewise doesn''t mean that you have to clutter up your boat with everything either. You don''t do it now in your present life. YOu make practical decisions about those things every day of the week. Nothing changes in that sense - it is just that the parameters are different.

Good luck

Johnno
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