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  #11  
Old 11-10-2006
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katytoo is on a distinguished road
Heaving to for a nap

Well, I'm basically a daysailor on Lake Erie, but I have hove to (heaved to??) to get something to eat and take a rest and have fallen asleep in the cockpit for a short time!! Not intentionally, but I just kinda dozed off and woke up a half an hour or so later. I wouldn't want to do this in a tight area when the wind was big as the boat does drift with the wind when heaving to, but for little catnaps, especially if the wind is not going to cause the boat to drift a long ways, or if you have plenty of room I would think that heaving to would be a good way to catch a bit of a nap. Remember, though, the biggest danger is that some hotdog power boater trying to impress his girlfriend or a big steamer heading into port may not see you and I'm sure it hurts if one of them runs into you while you're catching up on your sleep.
Fair winds,
Peter Kozup, S/V Katy Too
Cape Dory 26, Hull #42
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  #12  
Old 11-11-2006
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I use the auto pilot and the wind vane to help relieve the manual duties of my solo watch. I set my sleep timer for longer intervals during the daylight hours and stay more vigilant at night while underway. In the Gulf I hug the edges of the sea lanes. This keeps the rigs to port or starboard and most larger vessels stay off the edges. In heavy traffic areas I don't sleep. My record is 3 days with no REM sleep. Setting anchor was heavenly. Of note is an experience I had when crossing the Bahama Banks recently. Seems there are a number of sailors out there that have decided their safety and adherance to the Rules of Navigation is your concern. They put their boats in auto and go nighty night. In the same breath they'll puff up and show you their 6-pack captains license. My only consolence is that nature has a way of thinning these yoyo's out.
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  #13  
Old 11-12-2006
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I guess you could put up two anchoring daymarks and sleep for a few hours during the day. The signal of two round dayshapes over one another indicates that the boat is not under command IIRC. I think that if you're single handing, being awake at night is more important than being awake during the day... but it also depends on where you are at the time. Sleeping in the middle of a large shipping channel to a major harbor is asking to win a Darwin Award. Staying out of the shipping channels as much as possible is a good idea for small sailboats that are single handing.
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  #14  
Old 11-13-2006
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Just don't do it. If you are worried about a lightening strike that will damage your autohelm, get a second autohelm that is in an inuslated box. Oh, and radar. You should have that too.

Remember there is a big difference between a boat that can sail across the ocean and a single human mind which may be forced to make life or death decisions on that boat. Boats don't go crazy from lack of sleep. People do.
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  #15  
Old 03-07-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gershel
Short answer. You Don't. If you single hand, some sort of self steering is nessesary.
Remember what Rontoo says " one hand for the boat, and one for your organ". ROTFLMFAO
Marc
Come off it, mate! Self steering's great but not altogether essential. As I've said, I race single handed and the rules say no automatic steering is allowed. In suitable conditions I (at 73) manage to fly the spinnaker - getting it down is harder but manageable.
AND, I'll have you know, it takes TWO hands to play my organ how else to get the sharps?
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  #16  
Old 03-07-2007
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Tartan34C will become famous soon enough
Why are people so hung up on windvanes? My first trans-Atlantic was in a 22 foot boat that steered herself without a wind vane and I did that trip solo without a windvane, electric system or engine and didnít have any problems. I have used windvanes on other boats but they are not 100% required on all boats.

My current boat is a 34 footer and she also sails herself and she does it better than I can.
All the best,
Robert Gainer

PS. On my current boat I am adding a windvane designed and built for my boat by Dr. David Parker. Itís a neat piece of gear.
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  #17  
Old 03-07-2007
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This is a good post. But on the east coast of the USA and even into the Caribbean, you be hard pressed not to be able to find a place to set an anchor for the night. We are talking about crusing after all ..... And yes I know about Fl. and anchoring..
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  #18  
Old 03-12-2007
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Boat?

Hey Robert, I'm curious, what kind of boat do you have? Tell us about the windvane. Thanks Brandon

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tartan34C
My current boat is a 34 footer and she also sails herself and she does it better than I can.
All the best,
Robert Gainer

PS. On my current boat I am adding a windvane designed and built for my boat by Dr. David Parker. Itís a neat piece of gear.
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  #19  
Old 03-12-2007
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Duh Huh!

Duh Huh! Let me guess, Tartan 34? Am I right?

Quote:
Originally Posted by snider
Hey Robert, I'm curious, what kind of boat do you have? Tell us about the windvane. Thanks Brandon
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  #20  
Old 03-12-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katytoo
I believe that Robert Manry who crossed the Atlantic in his 13 foot sloop "Tinkerbelle" used a bucket on a line that he tossed off the bow of his boat each night to act as a sea anchor. The sea anchor would cause his boat to basically stop in the water, and this would enable him to catch some sleep each night, though I'm not certain how much. It should also be possible to heave to for some sleep time, particularly if one used a sea anchor in conjunction with heaving to to prevent the boat from drifting backwards.
In today's world, with the greater volume of sea traffic that exists, some sort of alarm system, perhaps like the CARD system which sets off an alarm whenever it picks up a radar signal, could be used to avoid being run over in the middle of the night by some giant.
This system obviously would not work if racing offshore, but for one who is in no big hurry it might solve the sleep problem a bit better than catching catnaps for weeks on end.
What good does stopping do? Isn't your chance of being run over by a ship the same whether you're moving or stationary? If so, sailing on autohelm while sleeping would improve your odds, by reducing time at sea.
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