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SVArgo 09-27-2011 07:49 AM

Mold
 
For the first time in three years living aboard we are battling mold on the teak. It's been a rainy month here on the Chesapeake, which is probably the largest contributing factor, but am curious to see what everyone's experience is and the best way to control it.

I also wonder if, now that we've started getting most of our produce from the farmer's market, there are natural molds, yeasts, etc. on the produce and that's why it's becoming an issue. We regularly Murphy's Oil then lemon oil the teak, so I don't think my filthy lifestyle is at issue.

Cheers

PorFin 09-27-2011 08:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SVArgo (Post 780058)
For the first time in three years living aboard we are battling mold on the teak. It's been a rainy month here on the Chesapeake, which is probably the largest contributing factor, but am curious to see what everyone's experience is and the best way to control it.

I also wonder if, now that we've started getting most of our produce from the farmer's market, there are natural molds, yeasts, etc. on the produce and that's why it's becoming an issue. We regularly Murphy's Oil then lemon oil the teak, so I don't think my filthy lifestyle is at issue.

Cheers

Ryan,

Since you talk about using Oil Soap and lemon oil, I'm assuming you're talking about mold inside the cabin.

I think you are largely correct that the record setting rainfalls in MD this year are making the situation challenging. My guess is that the increased humity has got more spores in the air than normal, and like most you've probably kept your ports and hatches closed which has cut down on the amount of air flowing through the cabin. It is possible that your produce has been the vector for some of those spores, but they are likely not the sole cause.

Increasing the ventilation will help, but until the air dries out it's still going to be less than optimal.

As far as chemical prevention, I think the lemon oil's a good option. We've also used tea tree oil (which my wife thinks is better, but I can't tell any difference.)

dhays 09-27-2011 11:38 AM

If you are plugged into shore power, I would suggest a small household dehumidifier.

hellosailor 09-27-2011 12:20 PM

Water Consistency
Sodium Tallate Cleaning Agent
Cymbopogon nardus (citronella) oil Pleasant Scent
Lauramidopropylamine oxide Cleaning Agent
Tetrasodium EDTA Maintains product stability

I'd bet the cleaning agents (aka "soap") in Murphy's count as a yummy buffet to some molds. Mold grows where it is damp, warm, and there's any excuse for food. Maybe this has been a hot & humid enough summer so that with just a little "food", the problem just bloomed for you. A good scrubbing (to remove the mold & food) and then just oils, no soap, should help. Harsh oils, maybe citrus and tea tree, not olive oil, since any food-type oils are mold food too. Maybe add some salt into the mix as well?

SVArgo 09-27-2011 12:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PorFin (Post 780077)
Ryan,

Since you talk about using Oil Soap and lemon oil, I'm assuming you're talking about mold inside the cabin.

Yep, inside the cabin. The cheap lemon oil is about all I can find around here, though I prefer Amazon's.

And if it would cool off a bit, I'd fire up the Espar and dispel the miasma.

zeehag 09-27-2011 01:10 PM

i use vinegar on interior and sea water on exterior ....teak gets sea water and oil. mold dies with vinegar and doesnt come back readily unless your area is enclosed with humidity.
on the exterior i use my seawater with a green 3m pad to remove all the dirt then oil or teak will turn balck.

Minnewaska 09-27-2011 01:16 PM

We've started using a new product called Kanberra gel this year. It is reportedly made from tea tree oil. We haven't had a serious mold problem, but have found this product to notably reduce boat odors. It claims to kill not just mask. It is pricey, but the refills are much more cost effective.

You place it out like an air freshener and it claims to vaporize and access places you can't reach. Ironically, I've found it to be more effective with less ventilation.

Kanberra Gel - Nature's Activated Protection

zboss 09-27-2011 04:07 PM

In the beer brewing community we use oxiclean and trisodium phosphate mixed together in equal parts. It doesn't qualify as a sanitary cleaner but it does kill and clean just about everything, including mold. It's safe to use on stainless steel (kegs). Also, it's really cheap. It does remove grease, so you should probably follow it up with an oil.

It will not provide residual protection though.

Use about 3 tables spoons of each per 5 gallons.

wingNwing 09-27-2011 07:46 PM

Like you, we've got a bumper crop of mold this year! And, like Zee, we use white vinegar. We then spray the surfaces with Amazon's from MDR (the green stuff, sorry, I don't have the bandwidth to give you a link right now) and leave a light film. I think the best solution, though, would be to go south ... ;)

zeehag 09-27-2011 10:19 PM

south is good--i found, however, some black mold in my slider on companionway--is still teak and leaky--oh welll.........just another new hatch cover to make........


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