only using achorages - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 09-06-2003
Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 77
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
Jeffamc is on a distinguished road
only using achorages

Anyone just cruise only using achorages? I don''t hear of it much, docking gets real expensive.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 09-06-2003
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 552
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
GordMay is on a distinguished road
only using achorages

Yes, my guess is that most cruisers spend much more time at anchor than docked. As you say, dock fees can really add up.
Anchoring also seems to more closely fit the lifestyle envisioned by many cruisers; tho’ this will, obviously, speak to a personal preference (you can probably infer mine).
It would be interesting to hear the motivation behind your very comprehensive (& non-specific) question.
Regards,
Gord
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 09-06-2003
Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 77
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
Jeffamc is on a distinguished road
only using achorages

hah, Well I just didnt know how safe it was, I didnt know many cruisers used anchorages that much, i thought most were docked.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 09-06-2003
Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 77
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
Jeffamc is on a distinguished road
only using achorages

Ive read many stories about people being hit while at anchor
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 09-06-2003
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 53
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
DonFoley is on a distinguished road
only using achorages

When we''re cruising, our average is 3 nights out and then into a marina for a night. This allows us to re-water and pump out, do laundry and provisioning of parishables (meat). We also wash down the decks, eat dinner out and hit a bar. Most importantly, we have a real shower.

Then we''re good for a few more days. We never anchor near waterways, thus we don''t get into any traffic. We try to pick spots away from other boats to avoid snagging anchors or dragging problems (them or us). I''ve never seen anyone "hit" by a boat while at anchor.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 09-06-2003
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Calgary Alberta
Posts: 212
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 15
magnusmurphy is on a distinguished road
only using achorages

On a recent charter in the BVI (one month long) we found that in many areas it was actually difficult to find any anchoring spots. Many bays are so full of mooring balls it is almost impossible to anchor. I''m hoping that is not the rule in the rest of the Caribbean (I''ve only chartered in the BVI). I know the BVI is very charter oriented and for most people on the typical week charter moorings are a godsent. We tried to anchor when possible but the spacing of the balls made that a challenge in many places. Happy exceptions were Cane Garden Bay, Anagada (we chose a ball as a result of very strong winds when we were there), white bay and others. These are however the exception rather than the rule.

On the plus side, with the balls, more boats can fit in so the chances of finding a spot is better. However at 25$ per night a longterm cruiser will not be able to do that all the time.

What''s the situation in the rest of the Caribbean?

M Murphy
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 09-07-2003
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 39
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
TrishLambert is on a distinguished road
only using achorages

Don''t know about the Caribbean...suspect that the ability to live solely at anchor is getting to be less and less.

On the other side of the continent, though, one can still live at anchor. Baja and the Mexican mainland on the Pacific side is full of plenty of anchorages, both in out of the way places and in towns. Likewise on down the Pacific coast...western Caribbean as well.

Perhaps the determination to live at anchor--which is indeed MUCH cheaper than including marinas in the equation--must influence the itinerary.

Trish Lambert
www.takehersailing.com
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 09-07-2003
Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 82
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
Magic_Moments is on a distinguished road
only using achorages

I prefer to anchor out most of the time. The problem I have is people anchoring too close to me. I understand when it is crowded, but I feel uncomfortable when I have to shorten my anchor scope to 3 to 1 to avoid swinging into someone that came in and dropped next to me.
Where I live Anchoring is free, state park moorings are $7 a night max of 3 nights. State docks are $11 for up to a 36 foot boat and rafting is required. Marina''s charge $27 to $45 a night for a 30 foot boat, my attraction is to anchor because of the price and the quiet.

I have never been hit, but I did anchor once in Ganges next to where the seaplanes take off and land and it was pretty loud and wet.

Ken
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 09-07-2003
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 339
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
jbanta is on a distinguished road
only using achorages

Magic_Moments

I am with you.. When I sail the last thing I want is to be in a crowd. And anchoring seems to be the best way to get away from 90% of the people while crusing the coasts. Do you have a kettle? That seems to be the best way I know of to be able to anchore under short scope and not worry (Too Much) about dragging. There is no way to stop someone from dropping a hook so close you need fenders when there is no wind and currents and slack. I don''t understand what they are thinking. I think I would rather spend a night under sail than anchore that close. But if they worm in.... You need a kettle...
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 09-07-2003
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 51
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
Heruka is on a distinguished road
only using achorages

what''s a kettle? besides the obvious tea kettle thing...
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:37 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.