Cheap and Easy Cabin Heating? - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree2Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 10-21-2011
cktalons's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 77
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 4
cktalons is on a distinguished road
Cheap and Easy Cabin Heating?

My boat didn't come with a bulkhead heater, and though I plan on eventually purchasing and installing a diesel heater, for now I have bupkis. While docked I simply heat my cabin with a small space heater (which works magic!), but if I want to go cruising and anchor out one night, I need something which will not draw electricity. I have a two burner kerosene stove, and I've heard that putting a terra-cotta pot over a burner is an effective way to heat the cabin. Does anyone have experience with such a thing? I'd obviously pop a window to vent the cabin, allowing me to do that whole breathing thing. Ideas? Advice?
__________________
~
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 10-21-2011
pdqaltair's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Deale, MD
Posts: 2,209
Thanks: 1
Thanked 33 Times in 33 Posts
Rep Power: 6
pdqaltair is on a distinguished road
Clearly, placing a pot over a burner adds no BTUs. Simple urban legand.

It does spread a little radiant heat, but to me it isn't worth the storage or trouble.

But try it on your kitchen stove, don't ask us.

Advise? pop for a vented heater, skip the CO2 / CO headache and wake up in the morning.

http://sail-delmarva.blogspot.com/20...e-be-heat.html
__________________
(when asked how he reached the starting holds on a difficult rock climbing problem that clearly favored taller climbers - he was perhaps 5'5")

"Well, I just climb up to them."

by Joe Brown, English rock climber




To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 10-21-2011
jackdale's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 8,876
Thanks: 26
Thanked 43 Times in 40 Posts
Rep Power: 6
jackdale will become famous soon enough
The pot thing has its fans. Turn it off at night when you are asleep. I never use any heater at night.
__________________
__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Offshore Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203, 204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 10-21-2011
Relapsing
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 155
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
ArcherBowman is on a distinguished road
Any flame-based heater that is not specifically designed for nighttime use is dangerous. All combustion puts out carbon monoxide. Leaving a stove burner on, pot or not, is a recipe for someone eventually finding a body at air-temperature, after wondering why that yacht has been sitting at anchor all week.

It wasn't too many years ago, the SCA lost a family of 4 at the Estrella War because they zipped up their cabin tent and fell asleep with a small propane heater burning to keep the chill off.

Really - cabin heaters need to be properly vented.
docfmiles likes this.
__________________
Captain Bill

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


"It ain't all buttons and charts, little albatross. You know what the first rule of sailing is? Love. You take a boat in to sea that you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of worlds. Love keeps her afloat when she oughtta founder... tells ya she's hurtin' 'fore she keens… makes her a home." Captain Malcom Reynolds, Paraphrased
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 10-22-2011
cktalons's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 77
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 4
cktalons is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdqaltair View Post
It does spread a little radiant heat, but to me it isn't worth the storage or trouble.

But try it on your kitchen stove, don't ask us.
A liveaboard around here has suggested and sworn by the terra-cotta pot idea. Buying a pot and trying it out for myself seems a waste if the idea sucks. Why go through a stupid idea without vetting it among liveaboards who might actually know something (the terra fan is kind of a dufus, so I wanted some second opinions )

I think I'd rather just dock somewhere for the night, and plug into power for my heat.
__________________
~
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 10-22-2011
jackdale's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 8,876
Thanks: 26
Thanked 43 Times in 40 Posts
Rep Power: 6
jackdale will become famous soon enough
I use a 0 to -10 C sleeping bag and never use a heater. I have sailed every month of the year in Canada.

BTW - I also will not use an electric heater overnight.
__________________
__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Offshore Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203, 204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 10-22-2011
Dog Ship's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Dolphin Beach, B.C.
Posts: 550
Thanks: 1
Thanked 16 Times in 16 Posts
Rep Power: 4
Dog Ship is on a distinguished road
I to have spent many nights on boats and in rv's out here on the west coast of Canada where it gets wet and miserable and cold and wet and miserable and...and...cold, and never ever have I used a heater during the night when I sleep.
It is far to dangerous.
Get some good bedding, bundle up and whether it be an electric, diesel, propane or solid fuel heater "shut it off at night".
When you are able to wake up the next morning you will be greatful for having it shut off.
At least you will be alive to turn it on again.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 10-22-2011
ebs001's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 2,140
Thanks: 5
Thanked 21 Times in 19 Posts
Rep Power: 9
ebs001 is on a distinguished road
Boats can get dam chilly at times. One of the best solutions we have found to make sleeping more comfortable under these conditions is a hot water bottle. It takes the chill out of the bed before you climb in and keeps your feet worm all night. At times, I also like to put one in the small of my back. The heating of the water takes the chill off at night and making coffee in the morning takes the chill off in the morning.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 10-22-2011
Ilenart's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: West Australia
Posts: 508
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 8
Ilenart is on a distinguished road
15 years ago a charter company in the Gippsland lakes advised us on the upsidedown terracotta pot idea. They even had the terracotta pot as standard equipment on the boat! The idea works fine, only raises the temperature a couple of degrees, however it is enough to take the chill out of the cabin. My guess is that it will only work on a small cabin (this was a 25ft yacht). I used it a couple of months ago on my UFO 34 and it works fine (I have a metho stove).

As with using the stove normally, you need to ensure adequate ventalation; I normally leave the front hatch open a couple of inches and the back hatch open so there is airflow through the boat. Leave the flame on low and shut it down when you go to sleep. Common sense stuff.

For those who are stating that this is a bad idea; it is no different from using the stove normally.

Ilenart
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 10-22-2011
Bene505's Avatar
Glad I found Sailnet
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 3,595
Thanks: 5
Thanked 40 Times in 39 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Bene505 will become famous soon enough Bene505 will become famous soon enough
Lots of blankets. Then more blankets..

We have 4 berths and I'm usually solo during winter overnights (Connecticut usually). I grab blankets from the other berths and just pile them onto mine. It's tough to be cold when you have an excessive number of blankets on you. (A good sleeping bag is a very good idea if you are space limited. If you aren't, then stockpile some blankets.)

No stove or oven on during the night, and we have a carbon monoxide detector too. In the morning, the stove quickly heats the cabin up a bit while making breakfast or a hot beverage. The propane oven seems to burn cleaner, so during the day I'll sometimes sail with the oven on and the hatch boards in place. If I do go below, the cabin is warmish and dry. (Occasional use of the stove/over seems to dry the interior. Perhaps because the heat lingers after I turn the stove off, but the cumbustion-created water vapor vents out quicker.)

By the way, our insurance company mandated a carbon monoxide detector. I'm glad they did. I wired it to the master switch. So if we are on the boat the CO detector is on.

Regards,
Brad
__________________
.
.
Great minds discuss ideas;
Average minds discuss events;
Small minds discuss people.
.
The best minds discuss sailing, anchors, batteries, rode length, fridge-or-not, freezer-or-not, and guns-on-board. I don't know why. It's a mystery!
.

Last edited by Bene505; 10-22-2011 at 08:11 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply

Tags
heating a cabin , heating while cruising , terra-cotta pots


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
over heating engine swillyboy General Discussion (sailing related) 14 09-04-2011 07:26 AM
Really cheap Mac 25 vs. cheap Rhodes 22 ?? sealover Boat Review and Purchase Forum 7 11-13-2010 01:09 PM
fastening to cabin fiberglass cabin interior marcusn Gear & Maintenance 3 09-06-2007 07:04 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:06 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.