So we're buying a boat. - Page 4 - SailNet Community
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post #31 of 46 Old 11-16-2011
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Take a couple weeks off and charter a boat. A skipper is only about $150 per day plus tip and meals. You will get the full experience with no responsibility.
If you do it twice on two different boats in two different locations. you will get a feel for what it is like.
If you really want to have your butt handed to you take the ASA 101, 103 and 104 class all at once. Some places will do it in 10 days and you will get to be on probably three boats and drinking from a fire-hose.
This is more like work however, they expect you to take tests, etc.
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post #32 of 46 Old 11-17-2011
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You have some geographic challenges unless the little-rumoured Okanogan-Vancouver canal has been built. If you want to live on your boat in the Okanogan see if you can find one there and save the cost and hassle of transporting a boat from the coast. I would even put signs up at sailing clubs and websites and see if someone would charter their boat to you for a year so you can try it out since the boat you have on the lake is not likely to be the one you do a world cruise on and in this market it is better not to have to sell to buy the 'real' boat.

Also, don't get hung up on boat length as the most important measure. There are a lot of 26' boats around that are totally different. More beam means more space but if too much can make the boat ultimately not stable when offshore. We have been knocked down in a 45' foot, 36000 lb boat. I suspect that the conditions we had would have rolled a smaller, lighter boat and it would be nice to have a boat that would roll back upright fairly quickly. Boat displacement is important because it gives the ability to carry weight (water, fuel, ground tackle, you, the dog, etc) but can make a boat slow.

Check out this website: it will give the dimensions and some calculated ratios that are important for a boat. It will also tell you what they mean

image-ination.com/sailcalc.html

Back home on Lake Ontario after something over 36,000 nm circumnavigator. Not surprisingly there is a lot of stuff I want to get done on Ainia both cosmetically and functionally. Getting an early start so it will be ready to go for next summer (Lake Superior?).
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post #33 of 46 Old 11-17-2011
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For two people and a dog 28 feet is about the minimum I would be happy with and maybe something around 30 - 32 feet would be better. Some early skinny boats will have much less room inside than others. Look at a Catalina 30 before you buy anything and you will see what I mean.

But something like this would be worth a look too http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi...url=&imc=pg-fs
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post #34 of 46 Old 11-17-2011
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The 22 footer would probably be a great boat for lake sailing in the Okanagan, however you should be aware that a boat that is suitable for long distance cruising is typically not so easy to move on land. While always doable it is just less easy and can be costly. Most boats that can be trailered with a pickup truck are not suitable for open ocean ( For those of you that don't know the Okanagan area is a mountain range away from the nearest ocean).
I would recommend that you purchase a boat suitable to Okanagan lake sailing first, if that is where you will be, until you are closer to moving on board. That will give you some time to research what you would like or not like in a liveaboard cruiser type boat, become a knowledgable sailor and be more likely to purchase a boat that will suit your goal in the long run.
You can look into joining this group, Bluewater Cruising Association, Vancouver, BC, Canada they are based in Vancouver but have a chapter in Calgary and Victoria, and are a fantastic resource for education opportunities.
Best of luck, and as a friend of mine that is "out there" says, keep dreaming, its so worth it!
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post #35 of 46 Old 11-17-2011 Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by killarney_sailor View Post
You have some geographic challenges unless the little-rumoured Okanogan-Vancouver canal has been built

image-ination.com/sailcalc.html
It has not been built, but we do not mind paying the shipping costs getting it to Vancouver.
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post #36 of 46 Old 11-17-2011 Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by killarney_sailor View Post
You have some geographic challenges unless the little-rumoured Okanogan-Vancouver canal has been built

image-ination.com/sailcalc.html
It has not been built, but we do not mind paying the shipping costs getting it to Vancouver.
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post #37 of 46 Old 11-17-2011
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I think the "Join a local sailing club" idea is a great one so far, and I'd add that after you've gotten your "feet wet", so-to-speak, start chartering and spending time overnight, over the weekend, for a week, to get a feel for what you will really need. Every boat seems enormous initially, and we even find ourselves saying things like, "Oh, I'd never need more than this much room", until we spend about 20 minutes on it and then it's back to yachtworld and the search begins anew.

There's nothing wrong with making a "decision" to go this route quickly, but you will better serve yourself if you take your time in acquiring the boat. There are so many little nuances that we each desire/need that it's hard to say, "You should go buy boat 'X'." There's one major consideration you need to focus on and that's headroom. If you're going to be spending 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 52 weeks a year living on a boat, you can't imagine how miserable that time will be if you can't stand up. In this buyer's market, there's no need to rush to any quick decisions on purchasing, so take your time, find the boat that fits your needs and fuels your desire and then begin that chapter. There's too many stories that start just like yours that end up poorly mainly due to poor planning. Here's a few videos from a young couple like yourselves that started their journey on a 28' boat;
THE LIVEABOARDS: SAILBOAT LIVING, WELCOME ABOARD!!!! - YouTube
But, take notice that there have been no "updates" in the past 18months?? Good luck.
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post #38 of 46 Old 11-18-2011
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You will likely have to pay shipping charges twice

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Originally Posted by mathewsaunders View Post
It has not been built, but we do not mind paying the shipping costs getting it to Vancouver.
I can't imagine you will find a world-cruise suitable boat on the lake so you would have to buy something on the coast and get it trucked to the lake and then trucked back when you want it in the ocean. The costs for shipping a decent sized sailboat likely will surprise you.

Also, when it comes time to buy the 'real' cruising boat there are better place so to buy than BC and adjacent parts of US. Prices are lower elsewhere and the selection is likely greater.

Back home on Lake Ontario after something over 36,000 nm circumnavigator. Not surprisingly there is a lot of stuff I want to get done on Ainia both cosmetically and functionally. Getting an early start so it will be ready to go for next summer (Lake Superior?).
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post #39 of 46 Old 11-21-2011
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Hello Mathew, I had the same dreams as you do. I lived inland a bit about 4 hrs from the coast and always dreamed of buying a boat and sailing along the coasts and around the world. I first purchased a 24' venture(macgregor) that was on a trailer. I enjoyed it but the head room was low and after 2-3 days aboard my neck and back hurt. Plus the factor of not really trusting that size to go out coastal cruising and not having all of the amenities that i wanted for long stays aboard. I sold it and bought a 33' Morgan O/I last may and sold everything and moved aboard and JUST DID IT. Now i am happy with my decision so is my girlfriend and our 2 little dogs. I looked at many many boats to buy, over 100. I decided that the sailboat must be 30' or larger and up to 36-38' but the larger the boat the more slip fees cost and i wanted to single hand it if needed, that way we would all have enough room and still have the things we enjoyed at a land based home ie. flat screen(its 12v), microwave,stove and oven, a shower(even though we have to turn in circles to get wet lol) and enough room for all of us to sleep. So my advice is make sure you can stand up and lay down in your new adventure, and yes a beamy boat is alot more comfortable.
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post #40 of 46 Old 11-21-2011
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Hi Matthew,
You may wish to visit your local Chapters/Indigo and find some books by John Vigor. He has lots of interesting things to say about what type of boat may suit your desires to sail around the world. There are also quite a few blogs about families, and couples that are doing this as well.

If you are truly minimalist and want to sail the ocean, check out Bika's blog: Home - Bika ... I own a Contessa, and I find it hard to comprehend how they are doing what they're doing on the same boat, yet they are and have been for years. I will hazard a guess that you can't do more with less like they do. I enjoy cruising on my small boat, but I could not live in her unless I was alone and not frequenting society. Here's a second video log of a fellow that just crossed the Atlantic twice in his 26' Contessa Red Admiral Trans Atlantic Part I.dv - YouTube : This gives you some REAL WORLD footage of what it's like, how the ocean can be, and how living on a small vessel is (even if just for a short time). If that doesn't convince you that you and your wife require a larger vessel, I don't know what will. :-)

You should check out the Volvo Ocean Race video's from the past and the current; The footage gives you some ideas of what ocean seas can be like.

Lastly, in fun, you must be from a few hundred years in the past... these days, we sail around the world, not across it. ;-) Watch out for the edge of the world, there be dragons.
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