Which is more practical to know about: refrigeration, sailmaking or diesel repair? - Page 2 - SailNet Community
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post #11 of 24 Old 12-19-2011
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People with refrigeration skills are harder to find than any other categories and there is hardly a sailor out there who has not, at some time, had refrigeration issues of some type.


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post #12 of 24 Old 12-19-2011
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Refrigeration

Getting certified is easy, its simply another piece of paper saying you passed the test that burned into your brain one thing. You can no longer release refrigerant. Certified does not mean qualified. Never teaches even how to hook up gauges, let alone what they mean.That being said I learned refrigeration with a backround in explosives. Knowing how to read a ladder diagram and a meter go a long way. Also took a couple basic refrig/heating theory classes. Then lots of OJT. Really though, a meter, a 10in1, and your gauges diagnose most ref/ac problems.

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post #13 of 24 Old 12-19-2011
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Also know people that have been doing this for 20 years and still have no clue and are simply part changers. Well, its gotta be this...or this...Lmao

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post #14 of 24 Old 12-19-2011 Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
Let's assume you are talking about being somewhat remote. Even a 4 or 5 hr sail to the nearest marina with repair services can be a significant distraction. As for certified? I would love to know how many real service providers in the islands are actually certified.

1. Sail repair.... Not verynhard to hand stitch a patch to get you by for a bit. Many even have a spare sail, so this isn't likely the biggest demand.

2. Diesel repair.... You still have the sails to power the boat. No iron genny is a docking problem for most, but could be dealt with the next time your travels bring you close to services.

3. Refrigeration repair.... What? The ritas and beer are warm!? Emergency.........

I'm going with refrigeration.


from this post and others looks like refrigeration is a win!

I am not assuming a remote place. I am assuming that I would be a liveaboard in a marina. I know marina's have their own boatyards, but lots of people hire their own contractors to get better results (or just lower costs).
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post #15 of 24 Old 12-19-2011
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Or electrical.

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post #16 of 24 Old 12-19-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peterchech View Post
.....I am not assuming a remote place. I am assuming that I would be a liveaboard in a marina. I know marina's have their own boatyards, but lots of people hire their own contractors to get better results (or just lower costs).
This is really a deal breaker. Most marinas highly regulate who can work on their grounds. At the least, they want a piece of the action. Others simply forbid anyone other than their own staff. There are some exceptions, but I've never been docked at one.

One trick is to get your Captain's license, if you don't already, and get on retainer as the caretaker of boats at your marina. The caretakers can sometimes be exceptions, but usually because their skills are limited. If you were taking all the work away, you might find them unwelcoming again.


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post #17 of 24 Old 12-22-2011
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Hi aeventyr60,
Another sailnet member told me you sail in the Thailand neighborhood, and I am planning to sail in May from SF to Bangkok. Need someplace to land and stay in Bangkok for a few months. I'm looking for a marina, if any exist, a safe place to keep the boat on the hard, a good anchorage, or a good place to tie up - up the river from bangkok. Bangkok seems most practical to me as i'll be living in the Chiang Mai area, Pattaya is too expensive and Phuket is too far. Must be cheaper than the average American marina monthly as i'll probably be living on a Thai salary for a while. Any help, and experience you can share is greatly appreciated. Cheers,
Axel
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post #18 of 24 Old 12-23-2011
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Ahoy Axel,

You will find that the Thai marina's have gotten more expensive over the past few years. Not sure about up the river near Bangkok, as we have mostly been on the West side. Also, Pattaya not a very safe place to leave your boat unattended. Many break ins at the so called "secure" dock. If price is the chief concern, then I'd leave it in Malaysia, near Langkawi at a place called "hole in the wall" I think a safe mooring is about 100 bucks a month maybe less. I know there is a new small marina in Krabbi, which we will be checking out in February. Over in the far Eastern part of Thailand, Ko Chang there is a German guy that has a small dock and few moorings, I'll try to see what i can find out. We are in transit up the Mallaca strait for the next week or so, so will be incummuncado for a bit.
Cheers,
Matt


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post #19 of 24 Old 12-25-2011
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You won't make much money off of fellow cruisers. Your better off helping those around you because you may need their help in return. "What comes around"...... I've found work abroad as a Dive Master, and as a Delivery Capt. And hanging around places that "Lonely Planet" Backpackers frequent. I've never had trouble going inland to adventure tourist hot spot's and talking a couple of adventure junkies into cruising to some out of the way islands for a few day's. I usually go inland because your less likely to get caught soliciting charters. I've taken countless backpackers over the year's from the Poc Na youth hostile in Isla Mujeres up to isla Contoy. From Belize City out to Turneffe Reef. From Lake Atitlan in Guatemala it's easy to talk people into going down to the Rio Dulce. You just keep it on D.L and tell them that if anyone ask's, their not pay'n you, They are just friends cruising with you. I've never been asked or caught. Any where there is a cool Volcano or Ruin's, there are adventure hungry tourist's.
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post #20 of 24 Old 12-27-2011 Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Capt.aaron View Post
You won't make much money off of fellow cruisers. Your better off helping those around you because you may need their help in return. "What comes around"...... I've found work abroad as a Dive Master, and as a Delivery Capt. And hanging around places that "Lonely Planet" Backpackers frequent. I've never had trouble going inland to adventure tourist hot spot's and talking a couple of adventure junkies into cruising to some out of the way islands for a few day's. I usually go inland because your less likely to get caught soliciting charters. I've taken countless backpackers over the year's from the Poc Na youth hostile in Isla Mujeres up to isla Contoy. From Belize City out to Turneffe Reef. From Lake Atitlan in Guatemala it's easy to talk people into going down to the Rio Dulce. You just keep it on D.L and tell them that if anyone ask's, their not pay'n you, They are just friends cruising with you. I've never been asked or caught. Any where there is a cool Volcano or Ruin's, there are adventure hungry tourist's.
This is a really interesting idea capt aaron. What do you charge people for such things? I imagine somewhat less than an "official" captained charter? (these types don't generally have the money for the official charter I would think...
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