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  #21  
Old 04-24-2012
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Re: Kitchen equipment.

Thanks all! I'm not a big foodie and the only nice things I have are a couple of Henckels knives, just trying to decide what to keep/store/yard sale.
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  #22  
Old 04-24-2012
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Re: Kitchen equipment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdw View Post
...unpacking it and ultimately having to pack it all up again is a pita. the small amount of space saved is not worth the inconvenience. OTOH .... on a 30'er I may well have different thoughts.
As someone sailing a 30'er I agree. Storage space is a real issue for us. I went with the Magma nesting non-stick. Easy clean up, stores inside the oven and the handles are solid when they're attached. A collapsible strainer, rectangular melamine plates that don't waste space in narrow cabinets, dollar store plastic spatulas and soup spoons and a good set of tongs were all chosen with size in mind.

I added an all clad 9” stainless sautee pan for when I want to get a good sear or do a sauce from the caramelized bits. All clad calls this a French skillet. For me the important thing is I can fit a 9” pan into the cabinet, but not a standard sized pan. Our first tableware set started to rust right away, the current set is a bit better quality and is on its third season. We do paper plates and plasticware too, but sometimes it's nice to each on real plates with real silverware.

I have a couple of Wustof knives in a block attached to our backsplash that don’t seem to mind the salt air.

I’ve also focused on reducing the size of containers. I have a small olive oil bottle that I refill and I’ve recycled some of the smaller spice containers to save space. Leftovers go into two small containers instead of one big one to fit the fridge better. Cutting boards do double duty. One covers the stove when not in use and one covers a side of the double sink. Together they add a lot of counter space.

I think it also depends on whether you weekend or live aboard. I usually cook stews in the dutch oven at home and bring them to the boat in smaller containers to reheat. There’s just nowhere to keep the thing on the boat.
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  #23  
Old 04-24-2012
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Re: Kitchen equipment.

30'er? I'd LOVE to have the space of a 30'er! The mind boggles at having all that room for galley equipment. I could get a third pot! maybe, even, be still my heart, an oven!
We don't have any specialized marine galley gear aboard Whiskeyjack, but, and this is a big but, we are in a freshwater environment. However, having said that, if you take care of your equipment, keep it clean and dry and/or clean and oiled, good old fashioned dirt-kitchen stuff works just fine.

Do you like to cook, or do you like to reheat? Do you enjoy chopping and shredding and peeling and slicing and marinating, or are you a heat and serve cook?
It makes a difference in what is important to have aboard.

Whiskeyjack is not as well equipped as Auspicious, and our presentation is not as , er, presentable, but we believe that living small doesn't mean you can't live large.
Olive oil in a pump sprayer, or even just a squeeze bottle, is a must-have. a little oil goes a long way.
Good nesting cookware is great- Cheap bad, crappy nesting cookware isn't worth the space it takes up. you don't have to have magma, but you do need something better than World Famous or Coleman. And, really, at Defender the difference in price between a cheap set and magma isn't that great.

With a little thought and planning any galley can become much more usable.
Before:
After:

A site with some good info:

Outfitting - Boat Galley Equipment
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Last edited by bljones; 04-24-2012 at 09:42 PM.
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  #24  
Old 04-24-2012
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Re: Kitchen equipment.

When we had a 28'er I put in a stove with grill and oven. Took up space but I never regretted it. Did the same on the 34'er and sacrificed other storage space to allow for cooking implements - pots pans crockpots baking dishes and the like. BBQ is indispensible for hot weather. Reality is that having space for a better galley was a major reason for going larger.

Even on 42'er space is still limited to some extent though only compared to home kitchen but thoroughly agree with Jonesy that even on a smaller vessel planning is so important. That is of course if cooking good food is a priority.

It also depends on how long you spend on board. A couple of days and preparing at home for reheating can be a plus , alternatively plan on all those two potters we've discussed in the other thread.

Biggest mistake we've made previously was going for small size. The space saved is really not worth the pain of trying to cook in undersized kitchenware. Its annoying and messy though of course you are always limited to some extent by the smaller size of boat stoves. A frying pan e.g. that is too large to permit using the second burner is simply not a practical idea.

Again in the 28'er we made do with melamine tableware. Crockery was a luxury we could not afford but now we have both and it really is worth dealing with the storage hassles of breakable stuff.

One thing that is of immense help , and I note that Jonesy has done this on WJ is having one or two fold downs. Sure it can limit movement around the boat but having that extra bench space when you need it is a great boon.

We managed on our smaller boats and Jonesy has shown it in exemplary fashion on WJ. You can eat well on board, you just have to see it as a priority and do the planning.

btw ... I've just received a copy of the Cruising Chef Cookbook. It probably doesn't tell me a lot I didn't already know but for those of you who want to eat better on board and don't know where to begin, this is a fine place to start.
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  #25  
Old 04-25-2012
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Re: Kitchen equipment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdw View Post
When we had a 28'er I put in a stove with grill and oven. Took up space but I never regretted it. Did the same on the 34'er and sacrificed other storage space to allow for cooking implements - pots pans crockpots baking dishes and the like. BBQ is indispensible for hot weather. Reality is that having space for a better galley was a major reason for going larger.

Biggest mistake we've made previously was going for small size. The space saved is really not worth the pain of trying to cook in undersized kitchenware. Its annoying and messy though of course you are always limited to some extent by the smaller size of boat stoves. A frying pan e.g. that is too large to permit using the second burner is simply not a practical idea.
I think that folks who do not really cook or know how to cook often make this mistake under the pretext that they can get by with a smaller galley, almost like the galley is an after thought or they will just make do. How someone who intends to live aboard can have a sub par cooking station is strange to me.

Tell me please "tdw" what model and brand of "grill and stove" did you install?

Anybody got a link to some upgraded equipment like this or other galley upgrades?

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  #26  
Old 04-25-2012
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Re: Kitchen equipment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bljones View Post
Whiskeyjack is not as well equipped as Auspicious, and our presentation is not as , er, presentable, but we believe that living small doesn't mean you can't live large.
I'll cook on Whiskeyjack any time. She looks very nice.
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Old 04-25-2012
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Re: Kitchen equipment.

For the galley on shore, I splurged on cookware and appliances and the old stuff that once occupied my kitchen, a lot of it went to my on-board galley. This includes a sweet little 9" cast iron skillet, a 9" Scanpan non-stick, a 12" skillet, old Presto pressure cooker (hopefully to be upgraded one day) plus some heavy-bottom pots. I have a set of SS knives and forks (cheap) and a moderate set of knives from Cuisinart mounted in a home-made wall block. I have a nice three burner propane stove with oven which we use quite a bit.....nothin' finer than sailing along in the autum while a chicken is baking in the oven.....the smell wafting up into the cockpit makes your mouth water AND the cabin is nice and cozy-warm while at anchor
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  #28  
Old 04-25-2012
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Re: Kitchen equipment.

If your kitchenware survived your dishwasher shore side with all the salt that you poor into it, it will survive live on board your boat.

ATB

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  #29  
Old 05-01-2012
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Re: Kitchen equipment.

I live aboard, and I love cooking in my galley far more than I ever did on land, largely because of the way I equipped it when I moved aboard. I bought a Cuisinart nesting cookware set (I think the model is "stowaway"). These pots and pans are the best quality I have ever used, on land or sea. They have a clad bottom which distributes heat very well, which is important on my pitiful and uneven galley stove. They have removable handles, but they are very secure when attached (no discernable wobble). I got the all-stainless instead of non-stick partly out of concern for the chemicals in the teflon, but also because I wanted to use them in the oven -- I don't have any baking-specific pans except a tiny muffin pan. I haven't had any problems with sticking or cleanup (just clean it quickly after the meal), and I even make omlettes without a problem. My dishware is Corelle (I have a very deep hatred for melamine), which can stand the rough treatment and is also oven safe (great for baking rolls or reheating food). My knives are Henckles and show no signs of rust. My silverware is some stuff I got as hand-me-downs from my mom, which she got in college... I'm pretty sure it's stainless, and it shows no sign of rust. The thin, flexible HDPE cutting boards are a must IMHO, since you can stow a dozen of them in the space of one rigid cutting board, and if you wear it out (haven't yet), they're dirt cheap. Quality tongs are a must for the grill. I like bamboo spatulas and such for the stove (quality, environmentally friendly, and no risk of rust).
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  #30  
Old 05-01-2012
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Re: Kitchen equipment.

I have two cast-iron skillets that I scavanged from the local thrift store. I keep 'em well oiled. I love the spray bottle suggestion, I'll have to start using that. I've been wiping them down with a oil-moist paper towel.

All I know, is that cheap, thin pots and pans do not retain enough heat on an alcohol stove. You either need copper-clad pans or at least thick metal to absorb and retain enough heat to boil or sear.

I don't like teflon, don't like the chemicals, or the risk of ingesting it when the teflon eventually separates from the pan. I have a stacking set of SS serving dishes and all of this stacks up neatly.

I am in need of plates and cups and found what I was looking for in the "entertaining" section of a gardening store- BPA-free plastic plates, cups and wine glasses. I also need some stainless flatware to eat with... I'd also like a pressure cooker because I don't and won't have an oven. The pizza stone is also a good idea if I can find a safe place to stow it.

...and the trick is for me to remember to pack all of this stuff.
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