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  #11  
Old 09-11-2012
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Re: I'll start here ......

Quote:
Originally Posted by davecason View Post

So generic sedan or trawler or sailboat, I have a friend that has offered to take me out for a month in Hawaii on a 58í sailboat to start to learn the craft and I would be taking navigation courses and stuff as well since I have a ton of things to learn Ö but Iím still stuck on power and I have it in my head that it seems to be a safer and easier way to learn the basics. So again folks Ö. Am I right or wrong?
I don't think the typical trawler has a trolling motor, or could get far on it if it had one.

The typical guy with twin 454's doesn't leave the dock. And he can't honestly answer you on his burn rate because he doesn't know (have experimentally verified this) - I think if he knew he'd have sold the boat .

It's true a trawler has more room. But the sailboat will get you home if the wind is blowing, and you can still motor (maybe about the same speed!). A cruising sailboat will carry a pretty good motoring range worth of diesel. It's true there is more to learn with a sailboat - but maybe that's good. The average dufus gets behind the wheel of his SeaRay like it's his BMW and could be in real trouble when the weather gets nasty, let alone be a hazard to others.

Powerboats have to learn navigation too. Of course they all just use the chartplotter...cheaters. But heck the Bums sailed around the world with one.

At least for the ones I've met the sailors have a monopoly on seamanship. My theory is that because everyone expects sailing to take some skill, sailors are more in tune to trying to learn and improve constantly. The surprising thing is, it doesn't take that much to figure out how to get the sails into decent trim and get the boat moving - though maximizing your abilities is a lifetime's work.

Also sailboats are much more awesome. And better looking (the boats, not just the sailors...).
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  #12  
Old 09-11-2012
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Re: I'll start here ......

Quote:
Originally Posted by davecason View Post
Hi! WOW ! Thanks everyone for for all the great responses! That helps me tons .....

So let start at the top, so there should be no problem with me looking at the old survey right? And yes, I would get my own survey done AFTER I make a decision on the boat itís just a matter of picking the right boat. Again, I've "just" started looking at the live aboard life so right now 40' seems to be a nice place to start and for one person probably pretty damm comfy. To me right now the focus first is: Can I get a boat thatís comfortable to live on but still have the ability to ďpop outď of the marina to go fish and play once in a while? Thatís where Iím at with my decision making process right now. How dumb is that, so Iím posting here to ask the experts. Am I on the right page or should I be thinking about ÖÖ XYZ first !

For example, after reading reading Paradise Parrotís comment about sitting on 300 gal of gas every day Ö. Holy crap! He knows what heís talking about, did I think of that? Oh heck no, duh, so now that Iíve pretty much gone off the idea of gasoline and now Iím looking at diesel Ö. Thanks Parrot, decision one has been made.

So now itís on to the powerboat versus sailboat and the type of boat to pick. I think for me, not knowing anything about seamanship, navigation, etc, the powered vessel with a motor or two seems a bit safer and a nicer way to learn. When we fish our massive reservoirs here in Alberta (grin) we have the main, our kicker and a little ol trolling motor so between the 3 motors we'll get back to the dock somehow. I kind of want that if I go out in that big ocean stuff on weekends, and I'd confine myself to inside passages and right around home for at least a year till I learn what I need to know.

So generic sedan or trawler or sailboat, I have a friend that has offered to take me out for a month in Hawaii on a 58í sailboat to start to learn the craft and I would be taking navigation courses and stuff as well since I have a ton of things to learn Ö but Iím still stuck on power and I have it in my head that it seems to be a safer and easier way to learn the basics. So again folks Ö. Am I right or wrong?



I also have the budget to think of ÖÖ Iíd like to get a boat for $100K or less, is that achievable!? I scientifically pull that number out of my butt but itís not carved in stone. I have one marina picked out thatís pretty much setup as a live aboard community with mostly live aboardís and floating homes in it near Victoria, Canada Iím looking at about $600/mo for a my permanent slip so that works for me.

I found Brainís comments about sailboatís being better to live aboard over an affordable motor yacht really interesting Ė can anyone add to that!? With my limited knowledge about this overall I would have thought it to be the other way around.

I also like Brainís suggestion of a trawler over the sedan but since I will be doing this all myself Iíd ďlikeĒ to get a boat suitable for a permanent live aboard solution first and worry about it actually moving later. So my focus is semi-retirement sitting on my butt in the marina and watching TV and just relaxing, so itís more of a home than a blue water cruiser for me right now. Iíve seen a couple of 34í foot boats that seem OK for one person and Iíve played on a 26í boat that was definitely too small for me personally as a live aboard.

Lastly, one odd question , I have a friend of a friend that owns a Sea Spirit PassageMaker 60 Yacht that has the single Lugger 1276 engine but he also has a Keypower hydraulically driver ďget-homeĒ system Ö.. I canít find much out there on that, does anyone know what that is?

Thanks again for all your comments and suggestions ÖÖ yea, itís a sailboat forum Ö. with people who know what theyíre talking about Ė works for me!

Cheersí
Dave
Hey Dave,

If you are just going to set in a marina all the time and watch tv, with little interest in going out or going far, just get a houseboat. They are very inexpensive, have as much room as a condo, and are a easy transition for you. We have a very good friend that has one and she also keeps a small sailboat to get her sailing fix.

If you plan on only going short distances and when money and weather permit, get a motor yacht of some sort. You will have maximum room for foot:foot, and though they are very expensive to run, you won't hardly do that anyways and will know your costs ahead of time. Difference is that some more distant destinations are at least possible here over a houseboat, though expeisive.

If you plan to go to distant destinations, live off the hook a times (if not a lot), but think your cruising will mostlyt involve going one place and staying there a good bit, get a trawler. They are relatively economical to run, have more space foot:foot than a sailboat, are capable of more distant destinations than most motor yachts, and capabale of taking a beating.

If you plan to really live off the hook or travel to distant destinations, get a sailboat. I don't agree with other posters that you are only limited by the wind, but for the most part, you can do distance travelling in safety and comfort and economically. They are the most economical to run, have the least space foot:foot of any floating vessel, are capable of very distant shores and should be able to take the toughest beating.

THese are all generalities. THere are exceptions to every rule. For example, I would take a Nordhavn places with more peace of mind than I would many sailboats. THere is a motor yacht across from me that has done a circum (of course she's 155 feet and for sale for 24 million dollars and has a f/t crew of 6). There are some sailboats that I wouldn't take furhter from the dock than I could swim back. But, this is a good generality for you to consider.

YOu can get an old motoryacht for 100k. But be aware, the cost of these vessels is largely in the engines which may be abused or worn out. Seperate engine surveys are a must for these boats (IMHO).

My comment about sailboats being better liveaboards than affordable motor yachts was not well explained. I find my 40' sailboat much more comfortable than any Sea Ray I have been on that is anywhere near its price range. But that is our design point (long distance and ocean sailing) which assumes and requires systems and comforts of longer term liveability. for example, we have lots of storage for can goods and all the millions of things that require cruising, we are efficient with propane stoves and ovens versus electric, etc. However, much of this assumes you are going to actually go somewhere and we don't go there flat (over the seas). if you are at marina all the time and would never leave, why not use the electric range typical of most houses (and absent on sailboats)? i mean, you are always going to have electricity anyways?! But that same range underway or off the hook for much time will require a large generator, more fuel, etc. Most of the Sea Rays I have been on have this little two burner electric stove that glimmers because it has never (or rarely) been used. Most of the stoves of sailboats and trawlers I get on look like (or worse than) the typical house stove. Why? Where we go, there may not be restaurants.

Seamanship is seamanship and is not avoidable whether power, sail, or trawler. Seamanship comes into play even at the marina for boats that never leave. DOn't assume because it is a Sea Ray with twin 454's that you can throw seamanship out the window. Nothing is further from the truth. In fact, I think they should be more conscientious of seamanship since their vessel has a vastly higher potential to cause significant damage and death. At 6 knots, not to belittle the impact it can make, but come on! At 40000 lbs and 40 kts, you are a killing machine.

ALso, sailboats are infinitely more "safe" (to use your word) than most motorrized vessels. We can, when all else fails, simply rely on wind to get us from place a:b. If your engine breaks down on your sea ray, and you are out of communications range, you are screwed. You are not paddling that thing home. If you get a motor yacht and ever want to go anywhere on it (much), sure hope you are a proficient mechanic or wealthy. ALso our boats are built to take water and more of a beating. We are typically lower windage than motor yachts, etc.

Just wanted to clear those things up. BTW, i am not against trawlers as I said before. Also, sailing is not hard. Mastering it is, but few of us really have. Sailboats provide thier own unique challenges and every vessel has a tradeoff. You have to pick the one that is most right for you. And honestly, if it is just sitting around watching tv in the marina and hardly ever leaving, no way I would own a sailbaot. It really would be a houseboat.

Take care and good luck in your decision.

Brian
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  #13  
Old 09-11-2012
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Re: I'll start here ......

One more edit: If you really couldn't care about the money, but time is critical to you, better look hard at a motor yacht.

Brian
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  #14  
Old 09-13-2012
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Re: I'll start here ......

Hi Guys,

Thanks again for the great advice folks, Yep, I think a diesel is the way to go too so now I need to find a boat. I never thought of that style of vessel but based on your suggestions I'll be going to Vancouver next week to look at some boats/trawlers. We'll see what we can find, and yep, I won't be going anywhere near blue water till I figure out what Iím doing and the fact that there are towing services available is nice, what is it AAA? (grin)

I do want to have a second motor on the boat anyway Ė I like the idea of a mount that would let me use the dinghyís motor in an emergency, and yep 15 HP would be a ďget-homeĒ engine if need be I guess. There is the learning curve to go thru for seamanship and especially navigation but Iíve got time, so at some point it would be nice to trundle up to Haines in the summers or maybe even runaway to the Baja Peninsula when the weather gets cold in Victoria but thatís a long way away.

Since I am looking at living in Victoria weather and insulation is going to be a factor in the boat as well and Iíd like to get a full camper back to enclose the rear deck for the colder seasons but Iíll have to get that made probably. On the boats Iíve looked at some have them but most donít so itís in the budget already. I guess itís a matter of looking at the construction and seeing whatís in the walls once I find a boat. You guys would know Ö.. what percentage of boats out there have decent insulation in them? In Victoria it can get down to 0 deg C in Victoria but thatís only for a while and being from Calgary, my biggest shock will be the humidity us prairie kids donít do humidity. I used to travel quite a lot and I tell ya when I go to Toronto in the winter and itís -10 you sure feel it, in Calgary being so dry thatís nothing. Some of the people Iíve talked to say a baseboard heater or two in the boat and plug them in, I dunno that works but I think the insulation will be something to consider.

I saw cruisingdreams comments about the beam as well, thatís one of the reasons Iím looking at power vs. sail, it seems like the wider boats would make a live aboard more comfy so there seems to be a tradeoff between beam and water friendly hull. ĖYes ? No ? I have no doubt that a sail boat would be great for cruising and the beam and design means that yep it will be a narrower and faster boat but I think for a first boat the power/trawler is the way to go for me.

Anyway, keep the suggestions and comment coming this is great !

Cheersí
Dave
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  #15  
Old 09-17-2012
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Re: I'll start here ......

Hi Folks,

Well I fly to Vancouver, BC on Thursday to look at boats ... I'll be sure and post what I find here for you all to have a look at when I get back !

Cheers'
Dave
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