Cruising to Canada - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 04-03-2004
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 124
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Nereus32 is an unknown quantity at this point
Cruising to Canada

We are going cruising this year! Finally. However, we are going to leave the U.S. to visit Canada (in summer) and the Bahamas after our trip south.

Can anyone tell me (in everyday, non-government english) what the procedures are for clearing into these countries? What can I expect? Do we have to stop at specific ports to clear?

We plan on entering Canada to sail the North Channel and eastern Lake Huron.
Reenter U.S. at Port Huron.
Return to Canada at Port Colburn (Welland Canal).
Return to U.S. at Oswego, NY for our trip south.
Then, onto the Bahamas from So. Florida.

Thanks.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 04-03-2004
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 388
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
Johnrb is on a distinguished road
Cruising to Canada

I can''t give you the exact procedures but here are a couple of links that should be helpful - one to the Canadian border agency responsible and the other to a U.S. Coast Guard site that provides the needed information. Good luck - I hope they are of use. I have kayaked in Georgian Bay (but not the North Channel) - it must be one of the most beautiful cruising regions anywhere. Just watch out for the rocks :-)

http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/E/pub/cp/rc4161/rc4161-e.html

http://www.uscg.mil/d9/d9boating/I68info.html
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 04-03-2004
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 1,120
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 13
WHOOSH is on a distinguished road
Cruising to Canada

N:

Clearing into both countries is somewhat atypical because both are so accustomed to seeing U.S. visitors. E.g. you might choose to sail from Biscayne Bay to Cat Cay, one of the islands where Bahamaian customs & immigration staff are located...but choose to only anchor there, then cross the Great Bahama Bank and clear in at Chub Cay. Or sail further on to clear in at Nassau. In my experience, Canadian officials are a little fussier about clearing in when first able.

If you use any cruising guides, they should cover clearance ports & procedures for those countries. Alternatively and WRT to Canada, look up their Customs locations on the web...or perhaps someone here can speak to specific ports on your route. But the basics are...well, basic. Have your passports (or accepted alternatives), boat document (or state registration), and a pen plus your wallet available and you''ll find it very straightforward.

While passports may not be required, I think any American is best advised to travel outside the U.S. today with one in hand. It makes returning more routine, especially if flying home unexpectedly vs. returning by boat.

Jack
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 04-08-2004
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 30
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
splitmind is on a distinguished road
Cruising to Canada

Customs are normally low-hassle. Have your paper work ready, and don''t bring your firearms in and it should be hassle free.

Be carefull what food you bring across the border. Certain fruits or vegetables may not be allowed across, and can cause you fines if they are not claimed, but found aboard. (This advice is the same regardless of which border you are crossing. Both countries treat this seriously.)

Do yourself a favour and use Canadian currency only, rather than getting an exchange on US at merchants. It is a hassle for the vendors and they will give you less than a banks rate of return to compensate for the inconveniance. VISA is always a fine way to go.

OH yah, make sure you have got up to date charts, and a good depth sounder. There are lots of hidden rocks out there!! The area is beautiful, and the locals appreciate the visitors. Have fun and welcome to Canada. The air is cleaner, the beer is better, and the sun shines longer in the summer. You will fall in love with the place so long as you are gone before the snow arrives.

A proud Canuck!!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 05-02-2004
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 1
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
topaztiger is on a distinguished road
Cruising to Canada

Canadian Customs is straight forward. When you get to port and call customs they will ask you for your name, address and citizensip. They will ask if you are carrying in firearms. If you have a passenger have them stay on the boat until you have cleared Customs. If you have a dog have proper Rabies and Iiscensing information. Good luck. Once in Canada enjoy yourself. My experience is that Canadians are the nicest, most welcoming people on earth. Canadian ports and cities seem to be very clean and low on crime. There is excellent infrastructure in Canada. Be prepared to hear stories on how Canadian Snowbirds were insulted by Americans when they traveld through the US at the onset of the Iraq war.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 05-06-2004
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Texas
Posts: 72
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
Mkfcdl is on a distinguished road
Cruising to Canada

I can second the last opinion. I''m a U.S. citizen married to a wonderful Canadian and have found Canada to be a very friendly neighbor to the north. We bought our boat in Toronto and then moved it down to Texas in a roundabout fashion. I can honestly say that Canadian officials were friendly and always courteous. Unfortunately, I can''t say the same about the U.S. officials, especially immigration--they seem to have a chip on their shoulders even towards U.S. citizens returning. So my advice is that you should be especially prepared with paperwork for the U.S. side. However, you might find yourself returning to Toronto as I am--at least for the summer!

Cheers and have fun!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 05-06-2004
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 30
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
splitmind is on a distinguished road
Cruising to Canada

I think we are always hardest on our own people. I''ve cross the border at work maybe 200 times or more per year. I am a Canadian citizen/resident, and have always been treated with courtesy, regardless of point of entry, throughout the USA by your border patrol gaurds.

The only hassle I encountered with Canada Customs was during their manufactured SARS crisis. They handed out paper work that was read only, no signature required. Once I left the papers on the airplane as I had read it 4 times in the previous week, (it was read and throw away) and forgot to have it in the customs line. You would have thought my middle name was Bin, the way I was treated. My only hassle into the USA was having to unpack all of my bags, to find an undeclared energy food bar. (Not fruit or veggie no need to claim, but great reason to hassle.) That said, 1000+ crossings, one bad story each way is very good odds. I think you are too hard on the American gaurds. They have a job I don''t envy.

As a Canadian, I''ve always loved travel into the States, and have been treated very well. As far as the war comments go, I''m sure some Americans have been treated less than cordially here due to GW Bush policies. We all have our winners and losers. If we can''t agree to disagree at times, then we are no better than the middle-east dictatorships that demand absolute compliance all the time. Hell we both still live in democracies don''t we?

(But, I still can''t understand the love of baseball versus hockey!)

Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 05-06-2004
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 339
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
jbanta is on a distinguished road
Cruising to Canada

I have never had problems with Canadian Customs. Most of the clearing is done by phone now. Canada''s laws about PFDs bug me though. As Baseball versus hockey (notice which got the caps ) Baseball at least wakes a guy up from time to time...
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cruising beginner Seanmc Cruising & Liveaboard Forum 7 4 Weeks Ago 10:13 AM
Message in a bottle Stede Cruising & Liveaboard Forum 65 04-15-2007 01:40 PM
Cruising permit in Canada? cdv43320 General Discussion (sailing related) 2 12-20-2004 12:26 AM
Bitchin Pardey Cruising Day rogerhjonesjr General Discussion (sailing related) 0 02-09-2004 12:51 PM
Cruising Power Boat - Advice Needed m000ve0ver Boat Review and Purchase Forum 2 12-24-2003 10:47 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:55 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.