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  #21  
Old 12-14-2012
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Re: Making a living as a liveaboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt.aaron View Post
I've cruised the Carribean Western Carribean this way. .
I'm sure a young man who looks the Club Med part, or Super Yacht Crew part could do so in the way you say.
But most cruisers are retired couples and retired single men.
Just retired from wearing a suit or overalls at 65 getting the dive ticket and strolling into a dive master situation isn't as easy.

Yes, for a young bloke or girl who is at the pull of adventure, fine.
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  #22  
Old 12-14-2012
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Re: Making a living as a liveaboard

Well if working while cruising at 65 is the discussion, of course, dive master is out, most thing's are. I'm a young 42 and have some opportunity's to work in the for mentioned places again if I want. A good friend of mine is 55, a dive instructor, and survived a Brain anoriism 7 years ago and is off the The Carribean this year to work as an intrustor down there, she will be living on a friends sailboat while she is there.. Coincidently I think it is in ST. Martin.
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  #23  
Old 12-16-2012
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Re: Making a living as a liveaboard

I work on ships. So I don't really make money near my boat, but the company flies me back to her and then we move on together.

What sort of skills do you have?
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Old 01-14-2013
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Re: Making a living as a liveaboard

I'm trying to extend my travelling life as it were by writing books and blogs but not much return yet! Google Malcolm Snook and you'll see I've been trying!!

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Originally Posted by B.Christ View Post
I work on ships. So I don't really make money near my boat, but the company flies me back to her and then we move on together.

What sort of skills do you have?
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Re: Making a living as a liveaboard

Thanks Aaron, I have a basic PADI Open Water and although 56 rather than 65 I don't think I'll make a dive instructor now. I've been trying to make a living writing books and blogs, but I think unless you're online all the time promoting them it's hard to make it work and that runs counter to the boat gypsy lifestyle, still I'm open to any suggestions and if other people want to self publish I have some experience to share! Malcolm Snook


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Originally Posted by Capt.aaron View Post
Well if working while cruising at 65 is the discussion, of course, dive master is out, most thing's are. I'm a young 42 and have some opportunity's to work in the for mentioned places again if I want. A good friend of mine is 55, a dive instructor, and survived a Brain anoriism 7 years ago and is off the The Carribean this year to work as an intrustor down there, she will be living on a friends sailboat while she is there.. Coincidently I think it is in ST. Martin.
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Old 01-31-2013
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Re: Making a living as a liveaboard

I've been earning money remotely without visiting my clients at all in years. A good personality, good work ethic, and reasonable rate gets word spreading around. Most clients now are happy with Skype calls and daily logs of work. I take only project work, so there's a definite calculated end to the work. Even my larger corporate clients who used to sing the tune of getting a butt in a seat on location, have changed their approach. They realize to get good talent they have to cast their net wider and adopt mobile and remote workers as a fundamental part of their approach. I'd also say that most business owners want to trust and rely on a vendor. I have had the same clients for years (5+), and they keep coming back. The reason? It's a pain in the butt to find someone you trust, ramp them up on your internal processes, people, and project history. It takes time and money to do this every time you have someone new. Most of my clients don't mind my schedule and availability because they know the work I produce and I have proven my trustworthiness.

My point is not to toot my horn, but it's to say this: it's pretty easy to land a client in any kind of work you do, but that's only the beginning. Work hard to keep them, prove your value, and they will come back. I've been floating on these ~10 clients for years (pun intended) and am weary to take new ones for the same reasons they are weary to find new contractors. It was totally unintended, but eventually they became like family and we send each other cards for the holidays, and whenever they need work done, they know how to find me.
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  #27  
Old 02-01-2013
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Re: Making a living as a liveaboard

Another option that has not been suggested yet is teaching. Many countries will hire Americans to teach English or perhaps a specific skill that they cannot hire their local teachers to do. Of course, this locks you into a country for a full school year, but you would get the full exposure to the local way of life and learn the culture. Friends of mine taught in Marsh Harbour in the Bahamas for two years. It was a great experience for them and the government gave them a monthly allowance for housing, so if your living aboard, you rake in both the salary and a stipend!
I teach AutoCAD and GIS programs so I could imagine finding something along those lines as well as English.
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Old 02-01-2013
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Re: Making a living as a liveaboard

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Originally Posted by ehmanta View Post
Another option that has not been suggested yet is teaching. Many countries will hire Americans to teach English or perhaps a specific skill that they cannot hire their local teachers to do. Of course, this locks you into a country for a full school year, but you would get the full exposure to the local way of life and learn the culture. Friends of mine taught in Marsh Harbour in the Bahamas for two years. It was a great experience for them and the government gave them a monthly allowance for housing, so if your living aboard, you rake in both the salary and a stipend!
I teach AutoCAD and GIS programs so I could imagine finding something along those lines as well as English.
Actually there is an "English as a second language" certification that is not too hard to get. I think it could really come in handy sometimes. Not that I think you would need a certification, but it might be helpful when trying to get the job.
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Old 02-01-2013
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Re: Making a living as a liveaboard

Has anyone run into issues with working remotely on their boat in a foreign country? I've run into tax rules about working being done in a specific country by a foreigner or for a foreign company. Or do we just not tell anyone what's going on?
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Old 02-01-2013
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Re: Making a living as a liveaboard

Having flexible employers is another option. If your pretty tight with your boss and they trust you, you might be surprised how willing they are to work with you to keep you there. Negotiation is the key here. I pulled off a 3 months vacation without pay. I didn't make any money while I was gone but at least I knew I could as soon as I got back. I told my boss I was going away for a few months and was going to quit to do so, but didn't want to. She told me we could probably work something out... Low and behold I was only a temporarily unemployed vagabond vs an unemployed one.

My cousin worked out a similiar deal working remotely for a year and he has a much more serious job as a lawyer. This is a case by case thing but my point is your employer may have more flexibility than you think... just try to think of how you can meet their needs while your gone so they won't have much to protest.
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