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post #11 of 24 Old 01-23-2013
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Re: The Bread Thread

I like Stmble and RicH H philospohy of rolls, betards, baguettes and find them quicker and easier to keep fresh afterwards than a "Loaf"

Here is a recipe ( not mine) I have used on board and at home many time to make pretzel rolls or pretzels. Instead of making wolls you can roll the dough into long strips and make closed pretzels. Great for sandwhiches

INGREDIENTS

•1 cup warm water (105°F to 115°F)
•1 (1/4-ounce) envelope active dry yeast (2 1/4 teaspoons)
•Vegetable oil
•2 3/4 cups bread flour, plus more for dusting the work surface
•1 tablespoon granulated sugar
•1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more for sprinkling
•6 cups water
•1/4 cup baking soda

INSTRUCTIONS

Place the warm water in the bowl of a stand mixer and sprinkle the yeast on top. Set aside to rest until the mixture bubbles, about 5 minutes. (If the mixture does not bubble, either the liquid was not at the correct temperature or the yeast is old.) Meanwhile, coat a large mixing bowl with a thin layer of vegetable oil and set aside.
Place the flour, sugar, and measured salt in a large bowl and whisk briefly to break up any lumps and combine. Once the yeast is ready, fit the bowl on the mixer, attach a dough hook, and dump in the flour mixture. Mix on the lowest setting until the dough comes together, then increase to medium speed and mix until the dough is elastic and smooth, about 8 minutes.
Form the dough into a ball, place in the oiled mixing bowl, and turn the dough to coat in oil. Cover with a clean, damp dishtowel and let rest in a warm place until the dough doubles in size, about 30 to 35 minutes. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper, coat the paper with vegetable oil, and set aside.
Once the dough has risen, punch it down and knead it on a floured, dry surface just until it becomes smooth and springs back when poked, about 1 minute. Divide the dough into 8 pieces and form into oblong rolls. Place the rolls on the baking sheet and cut 4 (2-inch) diagonal slashes across the top of each. Cover with a damp towel and let the dough rise in a warm place until almost doubled in volume, about 15 to 20 minutes. Meanwhile, heat the oven to 425°F and bring the 6 cups of water to a boil in a large saucepan over high heat.
Once the rolls have risen, stir the baking soda into the boiling water (the water will foam up slightly). Boil two or three rolls for 2 minutes per side. Using a slotted spoon, remove the rolls, drain, and place on the baking sheet, cut side up. Sprinkle well with salt and repeat with the remaining rolls.
Once all the rolls are ready, place in the oven and bake until golden brown, about 10 to 12 minutes. Serve hot.


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post #12 of 24 Old 01-23-2013
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Re: The Bread Thread

If you don't already have them get a couple of silicone loaf pans. The best thing since sliced bread.
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post #13 of 24 Old 01-23-2013
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Re: The Bread Thread

My recipe is pretty similar to Stumble's, but it's more a broad plan than a recipe. For each loaf, start with: 1 cup warm water. (Note: If you're planning to add a lot of other liquid like eggs and honey in step 2, start with a little less water, 3/4 or 7/8 cup) Add 2 tsp yeast and a tablespoon of sugar, let proof until foamy, 5-10 min. Mix in a cup of flour and beat well with a wooden spoon, at least 100 strokes, incorporate lots of air. Let this "sponge" rise for 1/2 hour to 1 hour in a warm place. (I hear Florida is a nice warm place round about now LOL. At least compared to Annapolis.)

Stir down the sponge. Now comes the fun part. Add 1 tsp salt. Add whatever fat you want: as little as tablespoon of mild-tasting oil, as much as 2-3 Tbsp melted butter. Add whatever sweetness you want: none, or honey or sugar or honey + a bit of molasses, or sugar + molasses, whatever appeals; up to about 1/4 cup. (If you measure the honey in the same cup that had the oil, it will slide right out) Add a beaten egg if you want to make a rich, cake-y bread, and/or a few tablespoons of powdered milk or powdered coconut milk. If you're planning some interesting flour, like whole wheat, rye, or corn meal, add about a cup now. Mix well with your wooden spoon. Now add white flour, about 1/2 cup at a time, mixing well after each. When it gets to be more than you can do with your wooden spoon, turn it out onto a counter and knead, using more flour as necessary. (Note, you southern cooks with soft white flour have learned to knead gently, biscuits, for example. This kind of bread wants more enthusiastic kneading. A great way to get your agression out. Think about politics, or powerboaters. That should give you inspiration to really work the dough!) When its springy, put in oiled bowl, turn to oil top, and let it rise somewhere warm till doubled, 45 min or so. A turned-off oven with a lasagna pan of very hot water underneath works, if you're somewhere too cold to just let it rise on the counter. Punch down, shape into loaf, let rise again in oiled or buttered pan about 30 min or until risen. Bake at 350 until you can knock on the bottom and it sounds hollow (about 30-40 min)


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post #14 of 24 Old 01-23-2013
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Re: The Bread Thread

Here's the successful formula 'ingredient temperature' for 'yeasted' breads used by pro bakers, pastry chefs, industrial bakeries, etc. etc. This will cause the OPTIMIZED temperature of the mixture for the growth of the yeast & to fully 'push' the fermentation.
Works with ALL yeasted breads.

Measure the temperature of the dry ingredients ...
Multiply by 2.
The 100-104° temp of the yeast pre-proof is ignored.
Subtract from 225 for 'french type' breads
Subtract from 240 for 'american type' breads.
the result is the added 'water temperture'.

For european breads....
225 - (ambient temp. X2) = temp of the WATER.
eg.: 225 - (80 + 80) = 65° ..... use warm water or ice to adjust water to 65°

For american breads ....
240 - (ambient temp. X2) = temp of the WATER
eg.: 240 - (85 + 85) = 70° ...... use warm water or ice to adjust water to 70°

If 'power mixing' add 1° to the ambient measured temp for EACH minute of power mixing (speed #2)
eg. power mixing for 12 min.:
225 - (80 + 80 + 12) = 53°

This will give you "consistency" in bread making, .... less 'dropped' or 'collapsed' breads, less 'explosive' yeast rise, 'weak' yeast rise, fully expanded 'holes' in the bread ... and 'best taste'.

;-)
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Last edited by RichH; 01-23-2013 at 12:36 PM.
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Re: The Bread Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by RichH View Post
Here's the successful formula 'ingredient temperature' for 'yeasted' breads used by pro bakers, pastry chefs, industrial bakeries, etc. etc. This will cause the OPTIMIZED temperature of the mixture for the growth of the yeast & to fully 'push' the fermentation.
Works with ALL yeasted breads.

Measure the temperature of the dry ingredients ...
Multiply by 2.
The 100-104° temp of the yeast pre-proof is ignored.
Subtract from 225 for 'french type' breads
Subtract from 240 for 'american type' breads.
the result is the added 'water temperture'.

For european breads....
225 - (ambient temp. X2) = temp of the WATER.
eg.: 225 - (80 + 80) = 65° ..... use warm water or ice to adjust water to 65°

For american breads ....
240 - (ambient temp. X2) = temp of the WATER
eg.: 240 - (85 + 85) = 70° ...... use warm water or ice to adjust water to 70°

If 'power mixing' add 1° to the ambient measured temp for EACH minute of power mixing (speed #2)
eg. power mixing for 12 min.:
225 - (80 + 80 + 12) = 53°

This will give you "consistency" in bread making, .... less 'dropped' or 'collapsed' breads, less 'explosive' yeast rise, 'weak' yeast rise, fully expanded 'holes' in the bread ... and 'best taste'.

;-)
This is why in the culinary world there is a fork in the road between the savory chefs and the pastry chefs. The pastry end is all scientific and measuring while the savory end is more about taste and texture. The pastry chefs are the accountants of the culinary world

Good explaination RichH
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post #16 of 24 Old 01-23-2013
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Re: The Bread Thread

All this Bread making is very nice and does come in handy when traveling away from shore side bakers. But... If you really want a treat, learn how to make Madeleines!! They will really make you a hero to a hungry crew/family. For example, see (click on) Madeleines .

FWIW...
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Re: The Bread Thread

I like Ms. Wing-N-Wing's "general plan" approach above. If you want a book which lays out the basics in a way that you begin to get comfortable enough to formulate your own general plan, check out the Tasajahara Bread Book:

http://www.amazon.com/Tassajara-Bread-Book-Edward-Brown/dp/1590308360/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1358966869&sr=8-1&keywords=tasajara+bread+book
-M
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post #18 of 24 Old 01-23-2013
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Re: The Bread Thread

Ditto on the Tasajara Bread book. I learned to bake by using it when I was just a kid. It does a great job of explaining the proofing, rising and fermentation process. If you want bread that keeps for a long time, I have found using molasses and 1 cup of oats per loaf produces a moist, long lasting loaf. Freezes well too. Fanny farmer cookbook has a great recipe for oatmeal bread that is foolproof.
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post #19 of 24 Old 01-24-2013
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Re: The Bread Thread

Hey - I checked the link on the Tasajara book - from what I could see, his method is remarkably similar to what I use (he adds the sweetener in the "sponge" stage where I add it second, and his sponge is faster than mine). What's weird - I *don't* have this book on board. I learned to make bread with the boyfriend who was 2 before Dan, and Dan & I have been together 29-1/2 years. The Tasajara book says its the 30th anniversary edition, so I couldn't have learned directly from it, it wasn't yet written. Wonder if that style of baking was just popular in the late 1970s? Anyway, going to try his method today, will report back.


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post #20 of 24 Old 01-24-2013
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Re: The Bread Thread

Sometimes it doesn't hurt to step away from loafs and go handheld. Biscuits rock.

Also, an easy change of pace that goes well with rice and barbecued dishes is chinese scallion pancakes
How to Make Green Onion Cakes

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