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Old 01-22-2013
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The Bread Thread

Well, it finally happened... we gave the bread machine the Deep Six.

Honestly, it worked fine but it is a bit of a power hog and a huge space hog. So we are now back to making bread from scratch in the oven. We do have a pretty good oven and it cooks fairly evenly, so we are hopeful this works.

I am open to suggestions on homemade bread. One of our biggest issues on stores is keeping bread (will discuss in another thread). We don't need anything really fancy. The kids wouldn't eat it anyways and I don't want to haul around a bunch of weird stuff.

Anyone want to share their recipes? We have two in process right now and I will report back on them. Our ideal bread is something to make sandwiches with. We do have a loaf pan.

Thoughts?

Brian

PS If you want, anyone that gives me a good recipe, I will put it in my Living aboard book with your name on it. If you don't want credit, no problem either.
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  #2  
Old 01-22-2013
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Re: The Bread Thread--Sourdough

Easy (Relatively) Sourdough Bread that tastes fantastic:

Ingredients
2 cups bread flour
1 1/2 cups sourdough starter (see below)
3/4 teaspoon salt

Combine the flour, starter and salt with a heavy fork and knead until it no longer sticks to the sides or bottom of the mixing bowl.

Place a lightly oiled bowl, turning to coat. Cover with plastic wrap and let dough rise in a warm, draft-free place until doubled in size, say 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Sprinkle lightly with flour and knead gently, removing any large air bubbles. Knead into a small circle, and then shape into a tight ball, pinching the seams together on the bottom. Place on a well-floured board or baking peel, seam-side down. Cover with a kitchen towels and let rest until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

Preheat a "baking stone"* on the bottom rack of an oven at 400 degrees F. With a sharp, serrated, knife cut a large "X" or cross-hatch pattern into the top of the dough. (*We keep a baking stone cut out of a large pizza stone on the bottom of our oven to help keep the heat even in the oven. It's good for making bread and, of course, pizza!)

Spray lightly with a mister and transfer to the baking stone (or place on a heavy baking sheet lightly dusted with flower or cornmeal) and bake until golden brown and the bread sounds hollow when thumped on the bottom, about 60 minutes. (Sourdough should have a darker crust than other breads, so leave in the oven 5 minutes after you think it is done.)

Remove the loaf from the oven and let cool on a wire rack for at least 30 minutes before serving.

Basic Sourdough Starter (Prep time: 10 minutes Inactive prep time: 12 hours)

3 cups warm water (say 110º)
1 1/2 tablespoons active dry yeast
1 teaspoon sugar
3 cups all-purpose flour
In a large bowl, combine the water, yeast, and sugar. Let sit until the yeast becomes foamy, about 5 minutes. (If the yeast doesn’t foam, discard the mixture and begin again with new yeast.)

Add the flour and stir vigorously to work air into the mixture. Cover with a towel let rest in a warm, draft-free place (an oven with its pilot light or light bulb turned on works well) for 8 to12 hours. (The mixture should become very bubbly.) Use immediately or cover loosely with plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator.

Preserving the Starter: Each time you remove a portion of the starter for a recipe, reserve at least 1/4 cup and replace the amount you have taken out with equal amounts of flour and water.

For example, if you remove 1 cup of starter, you must replace it with 1 cup of flour and 1 cup of warm water. Whisk these ingredients into the starter until blended but not completely smooth, cover loosely, and return to the refrigerator.

Also, the starter must be maintained by feeding it every few days. Refresh by removing 1 cup of the starter (give to a friend or discard it) and adding 1 cup of flour and 1 cup of warm water. Whisk until blended but not smooth. Cover loosely and return to the refrigerator.

If you plan to be away longer than a week, freeze the starter in a sterilized, airtight freezer container. Thaw the starter 2 days before you plan to bake with it. Refresh as indicated above with 1 cup each of flour and warm water. Cover and leave at room temperature 12 hours or overnight before using.

NOTE: Never keep your starter tightly closed! The gasses expelled by the yeast will build up pressure and may cause the container (such as a glass jar) to burst!

The foregoing excerpted from Basic Sourdough Bread Recipe : Emeril Lagasse : Recipes : Food Network

PS: IF you don't have an oven, you can actually make this on the stove top in a pressure cooker (without the giggler, of course)!
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Old 01-22-2013
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Re: The Bread Thread--Sourdough

Quote:
Originally Posted by svHyLyte View Post
Easy (Relatively) Sourdough Bread that tastes fantastic:

Ingredients
2 cups bread flour
1 1/2 cups sourdough starter (see below)
3/4 teaspoon salt

Combine the flour, starter and salt with a heavy fork and knead until it no longer sticks to the sides or bottom of the mixing bowl.

Place a lightly oiled bowl, turning to coat. Cover with plastic wrap and let dough rise in a warm, draft-free place until doubled in size, say 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Sprinkle lightly with flour and knead gently, removing any large air bubbles. Knead into a small circle, and then shape into a tight ball, pinching the seams together on the bottom. Place on a well-floured board or baking peel, seam-side down. Cover with a kitchen towels and let rest until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

Preheat a "baking stone"* on the bottom rack of an oven at 400 degrees F. With a sharp, serrated, knife cut a large "X" or cross-hatch pattern into the top of the dough. (*We keep a baking stone cut out of a large pizza stone on the bottom of our oven to help keep the heat even in the oven. It's good for making bread and, of course, pizza!)

Spray lightly with a mister and transfer to the baking stone (or place on a heavy baking sheet lightly dusted with flower or cornmeal) and bake until golden brown and the bread sounds hollow when thumped on the bottom, about 60 minutes. (Sourdough should have a darker crust than other breads, so leave in the oven 5 minutes after you think it is done.)

Remove the loaf from the oven and let cool on a wire rack for at least 30 minutes before serving.

Basic Sourdough Starter (Prep time: 10 minutes Inactive prep time: 12 hours)

3 cups warm water (say 110º)
1 1/2 tablespoons active dry yeast
1 teaspoon sugar
3 cups all-purpose flour
In a large bowl, combine the water, yeast, and sugar. Let sit until the yeast becomes foamy, about 5 minutes. (If the yeast doesn’t foam, discard the mixture and begin again with new yeast.)

Add the flour and stir vigorously to work air into the mixture. Cover with a towel let rest in a warm, draft-free place (an oven with its pilot light or light bulb turned on works well) for 8 to12 hours. (The mixture should become very bubbly.) Use immediately or cover loosely with plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator.

Preserving the Starter: Each time you remove a portion of the starter for a recipe, reserve at least 1/4 cup and replace the amount you have taken out with equal amounts of flour and water.

For example, if you remove 1 cup of starter, you must replace it with 1 cup of flour and 1 cup of warm water. Whisk these ingredients into the starter until blended but not completely smooth, cover loosely, and return to the refrigerator.

Also, the starter must be maintained by feeding it every few days. Refresh by removing 1 cup of the starter (give to a friend or discard it) and adding 1 cup of flour and 1 cup of warm water. Whisk until blended but not smooth. Cover loosely and return to the refrigerator.

If you plan to be away longer than a week, freeze the starter in a sterilized, airtight freezer container. Thaw the starter 2 days before you plan to bake with it. Refresh as indicated above with 1 cup each of flour and warm water. Cover and leave at room temperature 12 hours or overnight before using.

NOTE: Never keep your starter tightly closed! The gasses expelled by the yeast will build up pressure and may cause the container (such as a glass jar) to burst!

The foregoing excerpted from Basic Sourdough Bread Recipe : Emeril Lagasse : Recipes : Food Network

PS: IF you don't have an oven, you can actually make this on the stove top in a pressure cooker (without the giggler, of course)!
Thanks Scott!!

Brian
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Re: The Bread Thread

Ok, So, lately I've been making the no-knead bread using Jim Lahey's recipe. He has a book out called "My Bread". It uses a Dutch Oven within your oven to bake it in.
He has a bakery in New York called Sullivan Street Bakery.
You don't need an expensive french dutch oven..the lodge or similar from wallymart will work fine.

if you want to make sandwiches with the bread, I just take it out a little sooner and not let it get too crispy. You mix the ingredients the day before and just let the yeast work..

You can use the active dry yeast in a pkg...no need to make your own.

Here's the recipe: Recipes | Sullivan Street Bakery

Here's the book:
My Bread: The Revolutionary No-Work, No-Knead Method: Jim Lahey, Rick Flaste: 9780393066302: Amazon.com: Books My Bread: The Revolutionary No-Work, No-Knead Method: Jim Lahey, Rick Flaste: 9780393066302: Amazon.com: Books



I also make Irish Soda bread...takes about 45 minutes..if you want my recipe let me know, I'll be happy to post it.
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Old 01-22-2013
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Re: The Bread Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tempest View Post
Ok, So, lately I've been making the no-knead bread using Jim Lahey's recipe. He has a book out called "My Bread". It uses a Dutch Oven within your oven to bake it in.
He has a bakery in New York called Sullivan Street Bakery.
You don't need an expensive french dutch oven..the lodge or similar from wallymart will work fine.

if you want to make sandwiches with the bread, I just take it out a little sooner and not let it get too crispy. You mix the ingredients the day before and just let the yeast work..

You can use the active dry yeast in a pkg...no need to make your own.

Here's the recipe: Recipes | Sullivan Street Bakery

Here's the book: My Bread: The Revolutionary No-Work, No-Knead Method: Jim Lahey, Rick Flaste: 9780393066302: Amazon.com: Books

I also make Irish Soda bread...takes about 45 minutes..if you want my recipe let me know, I'll be happy to post it.
Awesome! I will check it out too!!

Brian
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Old 01-22-2013
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Re: The Bread Thread

+1 on the NO KNEAD bread recipe from Jim Lahey.
Recipes | Sullivan Street Bakery
I've used this recipe and must say that it seems nearly fool proof and requires the least amount of effort compared to many bread recipes. Not having to knead the dough makes it much easier to clean up too.

I think the reason that this recipe works so well is that you let the dough rise for a looong time (around 12 hours) which gives the yeast a longer working period and this eliminates the need (no pun intended) to make a separate sourdough starter. You can mix up the dough in the afternoon and forget about it until the next morning when you finally bake it.
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Old 01-22-2013
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Re: The Bread Thread

I don't really have a "recipe;" what I have is more like a general set of guidelines easy to make substitutions. Very handy if you're in an anchorage where you can't get exactly the ingredients. But it's a long, slow 2-rise method. I'll post it in tonight once I've had a chance to figure out the volumes to convert my mini-bread pans to regular sandwich loaves.

And for quick-and-easy on hot days when you don't want to turn on the oven, I'm loving making it in the pressure cooker Pressure Cooker Bread: less energy, less time, REAL bread! - hip pressure cooking But Brian, you can probably figure out how to do it on the grill...
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Old 01-22-2013
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Re: The Bread Thread

If you want 'good' bread, minimize the importance of 'recipes' and instead get involved in the fundamentals of 'artisan' bread making. Its not hard nor difficult and easily retained and only involves basic ingredients, a 'baking stone' for your onboard stove.
Once you understand that bread making is in reality a complex 'fermentation process' that needs quite precise temperature control - for the mixing of the ingredients !!, you will be making 'decent' bread - baguettes, batards and such.

My all time favorite reference for this 'process' ... and includes classic and regional US and EU breads:
"The Village Baker", by Joe Ortiz, Ten Speed Press, 1997 ... but dont dwell on the recipes; but rather on the techniques ... which (for me) includes the use of an IR indirect read thermometer for the mixing of the ingredients.
Then start with simple straight yeasted 'pain ordinate' and work your way up into 'pain sur poolish' or breads made from pre-fermented 'sponges', etc. The more you bake, the better your 'technique' becomes. Sourdough yeasts can be purchased.

On board I like baguettes, small batards and genoese 'flat breads', simply because the final bake time is quite small, the ingredients simple, etc.
The mess you make in the galley is no different between a 'good' bread and that of an imitation 'wonder bread'.
Lots of 'youtube' presentations on the all important loaf shaping and forming.

bon appetite
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Old 01-22-2013
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Re: The Bread Thread

I do a lot of artisan breads, and goofy long rise stuff like brioche. But when it comes down to quick easy sandwich bread I always fall back on this one. It's a modification of an Amish white bread, and can take a lot of substitutions very easily.

2 cups of warm water
1/3 cup sugar
1.5 tbs active dry yeast
1.5 tsp salt
1/4 veg oil
6 cups of flour

In a large bowl, dissolve the sugar in warm water, and then stir in yeast. Allow to proof until yeast resembles a creamy foam. (Abt 15 minutes)

Mix salt and oil into the yeast. Mix in flour one cup at a time. Knead dough on a lightly floured surface until smooth. (3-4 minutes in a stand mixer)

Place in a well oiled bowl, and turn dough to coat. Cover with a damp cloth. Allow to rise until doubled in bulk, about 1 hour.

Punch dough down. Knead for a few minutes, and divide in half. Shape into loaves, and place into two well oiled 9x5 inch loaf pans. Allow to rise for 30 minutes, or until dough has risen 1 inch above pans.

Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for 30 minutes.
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Old 01-22-2013
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Re: The Bread Thread

for a single loaf i use the following
about 2.5 cups flour
a dash of salt
2 tablespoons yeast (costco by pound)
4 tablespoons or so veg oil
about a cup of warm water (hot tap)
3 or 4 tablespoons sugar
place the yeast and the sugar into the water
then mix the flour, oil and dash of salt
next add the water and yeast and mix to a stiff dough
kneed about 10 times turning 90deg after each place back into the bowl
you mixed it in cover with towel for about 30 min till double
kneed again 10 or 15 times shape into loaf
place into greased loaf pan cover and rise for about 30 min till double
then bake at 325 for 20 min and your doneless than .50cents usd for a loaf
for french bread add 2 tablespoons vinegar to flour prior to water
sweet bread double the sugar.
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