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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising and Sailing with Children
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Cruising and Sailing with Children All things sailing and kids related, from safety to life aboard.


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  #101  
Old 06-25-2007
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Most of Perry's designs range from pretty decent to outstanding from the cruiser's point of view. You could do worse than to choose one for long term cruising. Like Hood and Brewer's designs, they won't always get you there first, but they'll get you there in comfort and short-handed ease of operation.
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  #102  
Old 09-16-2007
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2007 Southampton Boat Show (UK)

Sorry to bring up an old thread, but our planning/saga continues.

We now live in London, and we're exploring the sailing opportunities here. My wife is taking a dinghy sailing course today on an RS Vision at Welsh Harp Reservoir, and she's having a great time. We've joined their club so we can sail the resevoir as a family on their boats for now, and could have our own dinghy on a trolley there if we wanted to.

In two weeks, I get to do a sailing weekend with British Offshore out of Gosport on a Sigma 38. I'm looking forward to two nights and two days of sailing to Hamble and other parts of the area.

Yesterday, we all went to the Southampton Boat Show. It was like the Seattle Boat Show X 2. I have a gallery of pictures from the show here:

http://www.photos.sailingvoyage.com/v/album_012/


After reading about the breaking up of both Cascade and Pacific Seacraft, it was reassuring to see so many makes and models of boats on display, including a solid range of smaller open boats and pocket cruisers. Anyone for a new Drascombe?

Our favorite boats we boarded (in the realm of possibly owning some day):

1) Hallberg Rassey 342
2) Etap 37
3) Delphia 33 (half the cost of the first two on the list, but...)

As for our current lifestyles (remember: we don't own a car), we took a close look at the RS Vision and the RS Feva XL, which are rotomolded dinghy sailors with jibs, gennikers and extending sprits. Pretty much zero maintenance, and we could keep one at Welsh Harp reservoir or at Brighton (to dinghy-sail the channel). My wife is sailing the RS Vision today during her sailing class.

We also boarded the 1962 Bounty built for the Brando movie (but used in Pirates of the Caribe, Treasure Island, etc.). The Bounty was nothing, however, compared to the Gipsy Moth IV, which we boarded, lingered on, and chatted with one of the crew of the recent 3 person circumnav.

There was so much at the show that it was overwhelming to try and do in a day, and we might return for another day next weekend. The kids were blown away by the big pool set up for "try diving." It was filled up with kids 8-14 years old trying out scuba tanks for the first time for free. They would definitely like to get in on that action.

Jim H
London, UK


Last edited by Jim H; 09-16-2007 at 09:38 AM.
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  #103  
Old 09-16-2007
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Jim-

Lovely job on the photos...
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  #104  
Old 09-23-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Jim-

Lovely job on the photos...
Thanks, Sailingdog.

Today was a good day-- my wife passed her first RYA Certification (Dinghy Sailing). I sailed Laser IIs in college, but this was her first time on a small sailboat, and I think it was a great experience for her. Doing things like the capsize drill are good confidence-builders-- and she proved to herself that she could right the boat on her own (a RS Vision). The winds were up to 25 knots, and she had "Force 4" recorded on her paperwork.

We've joined the Wembley Sailing Club, and I'm looking forward to sailing their boats on the resevoir. Both of our kids are very excited about taking the Opti sailing classes in the spring.

Next weekend, I get to sail out of Hamble, and start my RYA 2 certification. We're both ASA 104 certified, but the RYA certifications are more intense (especially in the areas of night sailing and navigation). So, it's kind of fun to start over again with the basics, and learn what a pushpit is.

Here's a gallery of pictures from Steph's RYA 1 Dinghy sailing class today:

http://www.photos.sailingvoyage.com/v/album_013/




Jim H
London, UK

Last edited by Jim H; 09-23-2007 at 04:18 PM.
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  #105  
Old 10-02-2007
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First Sail on the Solent

Next step in saga:

I'm happy to report that I had an excellent first weekend of sailing on the Solent, heading out of Hamble and spending the night at East Cowes on the Isle of Wight. I was on a two day course with British Offshore Sailing School, and I pretty much was doing the Dayskipper practical curriculum even though I had signed up for the Competent Crew practical.

Details:
there were five students and one instructor, and we took out a Sigma 38 that participated in this year's Fastnet race. They were just finishing the install of all new standing rigging when I showed up on Friday night for the first night aboard, and I was pretty surprised by how comfortable the internal fitting out was for a fast boat. For 38 feet, it was still a fractional rig, and it had a regular back stay and running back stays.

Saturday was wet and calm, but lunch on the hook beside Calshot was pretty bouncy. We did MOB drills and some chart work, calculating a course against a 2 knot current from buoy to buoy.

Pints at the marina pub in East Cowes were topped by a walk on the "pontoons," where I came across B&Q, Ellen MacArthur's record-making circumnav trimaran. It was for sale, no less, but it's extensive sponsor labels had been removed.

Sunday had force 4-5 winds from the East, and I had the helm as we left East Cowes and beat close hauled into the wind and chop. We buried the rail, and I was rather glad to have five-foot wheel to hold onto. After that, we turned back to run with the wind back to Hamble to put the boat to bed.

A good time was had by all.

For more pictures, go to

http://www.photos.sailingvoyage.com/v/album_014

My wife plans to head to Hamble for the same sailing weekend this month, and we both will schedule our five day theory courses for Dayskipper in Greenwich so that we can do the five-day practical course on the Solent in the spring. I'm particularly looking forward to the night sailing.



Jim H
London, UK
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  #106  
Old 10-02-2007
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Nice stuff. Please keep us posted. You seem to have access to a lot of quality boats and sailing opportunities, which is perhaps more of a credit to your persuasion than to your locale!
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  #107  
Old 10-16-2007
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Next Step: Our Next Boat?


1860 Warrior (at Portsmouth)


We're now moving into the "what's our next boat" phase, beginning with "where would we keep it" and "how much is this going to cost?"

Toward this end, we spent two nights in Portsmouth, and explored three marinas in Gosport and the Portsmouth area. Haslar Marina in Gosport is our favorite, since it is close to the train and ferry stations, making it a quicker, direct trip from London (about 2.5 hours) by train.

We also visited the historic boat yards, and saw the Warrior, the Mary Rose, and the HMS Victory. For the record, the British put us to shame with how they maintain and display their historic ships. I've seen the USS Constellation in Baltimore's Inner Harbor, but it was nothing like the experience of seeing the Warrior.

During our walks in the Marinas, we also checked about boats. We were surprised by the number of Contessa sailboats (both 26 and 32s), but even the 32 might be tight for a family of four and my 6 ft height. It was great to see so many of them, however.

Next up the scale is the Westerly Fulmar 32 footer, which my wife sailed for a weekend and really enjoyed. More volume, good reputation, and probably about right for cruising up to two weeks for four (round Britain, across the channel).

After that is the Vancouver 32 and 34-- much more of a long-range cruiser. Maybe overkill for the channel, but has the option of crossing the Atlantic in the future. Maybe not the best for daysailing, but tempting to go a bit more (50k pounds) for a 32.

We also saw Rustler 36s, lots of HRs, and a Hunter Mystery 35 (British-make, not the US Hunter). Here's a photo gallery of the trip, with a lot of pictures of the boats (both in the Marina and the historic boatyards):

http://www.photos.sailingvoyage.com/v/album_015/

Here's a quiz-- we saw one very nice boat in our size that we couldn't ID. Could someone identify this boat by it's hull stripe for us?





Finally, we still have today off, so we joined the London-based Cruising Association and are going down to use their library this afternoon. I was there last week for a great lecture about sailing around England with kids, and my wife go to this week's lecture by a couple that circumnavigated twice during the last 17 years (part motorbike, mostly sailboat). The CA website is here:

http://www.cruising.org.uk/


The association also has a crew-exchange service, so we might be able to crew for some cruisers if we don't have our own boat for awhile. I liked the members I met last week, so this could be pretty exiting.

Thanks!

Jim H
London, UK

Last edited by Jim H; 10-16-2007 at 06:26 AM.
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  #108  
Old 10-16-2007
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Jim,

The unidentified boat reminded me at first of the Rivals I've sailed on, similar arrow stripe but not identical. Also, the Rivals do not normally have a portlight in the foremost end of the coachroof, but some were customer finished so that's not necessarily determinative.

However, I'm going to have to go with: Nicholson 35.

The other unidentified boat in your photo gallery looks very similar to the Morris/Victoria 26, but I'd need to see more photos to be sure.

Neat stuff.
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  #109  
Old 10-22-2007
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....Back to cruising with kids
I just came across this link and thought it might be helpful. (The web page had reprinted a section of Gwenda Cornell's book without designating paragraphs but the content is worth the effort of reading it.
http://www.familytravelguides.com/ar.../cruisin1.html

Robyn
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  #110  
Old 10-23-2007
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John, you win the prize. It is a Nic 35 (and much nicer than I thought they looked). Good Old Boat has a Cove Stripe Index for identifying boats, and here's the confirmation for the Nic 35:

http://www.goodoldboat.com/cove_stripes_j-r.html#N


Quote:
Originally Posted by Yofy View Post
....Back to cruising with kids
I just came across this link and thought it might be helpful.

Robyn
Robyn, thanks for the link. I liked the article, and it should note that kids can be relatively good at the helm as well. My 10 year-old son had the tiller for about an hour and a half crossing a channel in the San Juan Islands earlier this year, and he was very proud of the accomplishment. My daughter was the official chart-plotter person, and both of them took the dinghy off by themselves to explore Lummi Island without us on the last night of the cruise.

I promised to look into a used Opti for them if they both take and enjoy Opti sailing courses next Spring at Welsh Harp Reservoir, and my son could even take British Offshore sailing weekends with me and earn his Competent Crew rating already (there's no age limit).

I just returned from another weekend of sailing on the Solent, and it was a great learning experience with the British Offshore folks. My muscles are sore and and I have more than one "boat bite" from the weekend, but I got to sail a Westerly Fulmar 32 footer and enjoyed the boat. We cruised up the Medina River on the Isle of Wight and docked near the Folly Inn, where we enjoyed dinner and then the big Rugby Match (England vs. South Africa). At the Folly Inn, there is literally dancing on the tables, and last Saturday night was no exception (despite England's loss in the match).

The boat I sailed is featured in a series of videos that the school supports, and the curious can see some footage from the boat I was on here (see Sailing Skills clip):

http://www.yachtingtv.co.uk/archive_episode_2.htm

Overall, I think that the Yachting TV site isn't bad:

http://www.yachtingtv.co.uk/

Of course, now I'm a weekend ahead of my wife in terms of earning my RYA 2 certification (only need my night sail now), so of course she's planning to head there this weekend for a three-day cruise to catch up and pass me. (She's actually be certified if she goes for 3 days).

One thing I think I can admit: the RYA certifications take about 3-4 times as long to earn as the equivilent ASA certifications, and I think that they are more extensive and confidence building. I'm really looking forward to the night sail to complete the RYA 2 certification. After that, to get the Dayskipper certification, we have five days of classroom work (theory part) and then five days sailing (practical part), with lots of navigation and other work involved.

So, the preparation for cruising with kids now is to really earn and learn some skills.

Jim H
London, UK

Last edited by Jim H; 10-23-2007 at 02:25 PM.
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