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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising and Sailing with Children
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Cruising and Sailing with Children All things sailing and kids related, from safety to life aboard.


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  #81  
Old 06-06-2007
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My wife and I did exactly what you are planning on doing. We did a four year circumnavigation with our kids (ages 9 & 11 when we left and almost 13 & 15 when we arrived home). Our boat was a Valiant 40 named Tamure and we found it to be the perfect boat for us. We rented our house while we were gone and I am glad we did, because house prices went up so much where we live that I doubt we could have afforded to buy it back when we returned. We also had our boat for a few years before we left and spent that time slowly upgrading her for a world cruise.

We took many pictures and our son has put our slide show on his website. If you want to see it go to:

http://www.pbase.com/akuhner/greatescape

From there, click on the first image, then scroll down to read the
text. Click on "next" when you are ready to go to the next slide.
With this format you can stop where ever you need to, then come back
to the show and start again where you left off.

If you leave your email address, I will send you the copies of our news letters that you might find interesting. BTW when our kids got back into the local high school they each graduated in the top 5% of their class and each went to an Ivy League college.

Don't give up the dream. Don't be overwhelmed at the enormity of it all. Just say to yourself, "If we do want to go sailing in two or three years, what do we have to do to be able to cast off the dock lines. Then do each little step one at a time, knowing that if at any time events dictate that you cannot go, you can always change your plans. However, unless you have done each of the little steps to get you there.

Scott Kuhner
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  #82  
Old 06-06-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pfschey
I just read your thread and you referred to Lattitude 38 comments on low cost cruising. What are you referring to, please? We are just thinking about going crusing. We are in the beginning stage, very beginning and I'd like to read as much as possible if anyone has suggestions.
Hi, Pamela

Sorry I was slow to respond: things are busy. We have an accepted offer on our house, and the inspector is going through it as I type this at the Lucky Lab Pub in Multnomah Village.

You can find Latitude 38 at

Welcome to Latitude 38 - Northern California's Leading Sailing & Marine Magazine

Just go to the letters section at

Latitude 38 Letters - Index

and start paging through. Latitude 38 is a free monthly published in SF, and it's editors have some of the best advice I've seen about sensible, low cost cruising. One article they had about about a guy who sailed the south pacific in a home build catamaran for about $50 a month. He's currently a teacher in So Cal building his next Cat for round two. I like the publication because they don't have the attitude that it takes a fifty footer less than two years old to cross an ocean. Their point is that you can go a long ways on a Albin Vega (or similar boat) with the right attitude and common sense.

As for us, the days are ticking down to our move to London. Still, we've been sailing about twice a week on our Cal 20 that I half-own with my brother, and he's going to keep it in our absence.

Here's a pic from a recent sail with our kids:



Here's more pictures.

Good luck with your planning!

Jim H

Last edited by Jim H; 06-09-2007 at 12:55 PM.
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  #83  
Old 06-06-2007
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Hey SKUHNER...and how is Miss Kitty!?? Don't forget to tell 'em to buy a Spade Anchor!! Hope we see you guys soon again!
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  #84  
Old 06-06-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sgkuhner
My wife and I did exactly what you are planning on doing. We did a four year circumnavigation with our kids (ages 9 & 11 when we left and almost 13 & 15 when we arrived home).
We took many pictures and our son has put our slide show on his website. If you want to see it go to:

http://www.pbase.com/akuhner/greatescape

Scott,

Thanks for the pictures and the link-- your pictures and story are terrific. I'm certain things have changed some since you cruised, but we're still excited about a similar voyage. In our family, my eight-year old daughter is the cabin captain and the official photographer and videographer, and I hope we can do something like your trip in the near future.

I've always liked the Valiant 40s, but some sound like they would be complex to take on. I also "fell" for a fully renovated Spencer 42 recently, and it was hard to walk away from such a quality rebuild. Our number one personal goal in England is to start building off-shore experience, and we have another week of chartering in the San Juan islands lined up just two weeks from now.

Thanks again, and now I need to finish my third pint of triple threat IPA...

Jim H
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  #85  
Old 06-06-2007
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When I first saw this thread many moons ago my only thought was "why?" But that's merely a sign of an aging somewhat curmudgeonly wombat who wouldn't cruise with kids in a million years.

However having just had a wander through James (?) Palley's "Unlikely Passages" I refer you to the chapter (12 I think) entitled "Children Afloat", the text of which reads in it's entirety "Better that than onboard".

I liked that.
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  #86  
Old 06-07-2007
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Smile Another Family sailing off for 3 - 5 years

Hi Jim,
I just wanted to let you know that my husband and I are now watching intently to everything that is written. We plan on leaving May 2008. This decision was just made last week. Its not in stone yet, but If i know us It will happen.
For LadyH Very powerful words. As you said jump in 2 feet, now, not later. Well we just need to get organized and then jump.
We will be traveling with 2 girls age( now ) 9 and 10.

Some questions I do have for all of you, especially Jim,
1.what are you using for home schooling. And what are some recommendations.
2. when are you leaving?
3. what extra courses should one take
4.
look forward to hearing from everyone
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  #87  
Old 06-08-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Devinswings
1.what are you using for home schooling. And what are some recommendations.
2. when are you leaving?
3. what extra courses should one take
look forward to hearing from everyone
The typical responses for home schooling are the Calvert School for elementary and middle grades (Calvert School in Baltimore). If we were to leave now, I'd be tempted to buy the curriculum used off of Ebay (the books and the sequence), and then supplement it with our own materials and projects. The only thing is that I'd want to make certain our curriculum was meeting standards, etc., but both my wife and I have been in education for nearly 20 years so it shouldn't be too hard.

For upper school, the most interesting program I've heard of is the Westbridge Academy that was discussed at the Hacking Family's site: School

I liked the sound of it's design, but it's not inexpensive.

As for our departure date, it changes all the time. For example, we seriously considered a start this July in Puget Sound. We found a well-restored boat, and figured we'd cruise for four months in the Sound to get our sea legs, and then head south on our own or with a hired captain or crew if we needed help offshore.

As good as that sounds, our finances at the start and for the next 2-5 years would have been a bit tentative, even with a good house sale.

At the same time, the London opportunity came up. Good job, good school for the kids, adventure, and the dropping of 80% of our stuff (house, cars, boats, furniture, books). At the same time, we could enjoy a lot of European travel while still having our careers.

So, we opted for that adventure, with cruising on the horizon. We love to sail and cruise, but learning about other cultures and making friends around the world is our real goal, and moving to Europe is a nice part of that for two or more years-- as long as we get to charter in the Med.

Jim H

Last edited by Jim H; 06-09-2007 at 12:56 PM.
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  #88  
Old 06-09-2007
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You GO

Jim:

Saw this thread come up and thought that I would reply. We recently (3 weeks ago) finished a 2-year cruise around North America with our two children ( now 10 and 9) so my comments are not without some experince. But they are only my thoughts on the subject. We learned so much and have so much more to learn.

We purchased a new Beneteau 411 in 2000 in anticipation of this trip with our 2 infant children. Kids got bigger, the 411 did not go to weather very well under sail and we wanted a bigger platform. We purchased our 461 18 weeks before departure date and then spent 7/24 refitting and fixing her up. Sadly only sailed her twice before we moved the boat to Waukegan. We decided to use the first 6 months on the Great Lakes as one big shake down cruise which, in hind-sight, was a decent decision as we had plenty of accessible mechanical support.

I would not live on the boat for a year prior to leaving. Nothing to be gained as your boat rots in the water for another year without any use. Not knowing where you live I would suggest at least one 3-4 day trip about 4 months before you leave because things do not fail 1) at the dock or 2) where you can get a replacement part. Get the easy fixes done while still state side.

The biggest surprise of our journey was the amount of time we spent with the Volvo Penta turned on. Our log, which was religously filled in on each segment of our trip, confirms that we sailed only 27% of the time. The rest was motor sailing or just motoring. If we were hard core sailors we probably could have increased the 27% to 35% to 40%.

For that reason alone I would put 75% of that repair kitty into 1) making sure you have a very reliable diesel and 2) you have an exhaustive supply part inventory for your diesel. We put a new head sail on the boat before leaving and that $5k would have been much better spent rebuilding the turbo and transmission.

As we return to our home yacht club we are saddened to see a couple boats still at their slips after having planned and dreamed of exotic destinations for their boats. We have come and gone and they are still here. The point is, and it was liberally offered to us before we left, the best boat to go on the trip with is the one you own and the time to go is now.

We are home for six months and will be looking for the Bahamas again in November 2007. Best of luck and hold on to the dream 'cause it is worth every moment of it!

RDL
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  #89  
Old 06-09-2007
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MilanoMyst-

I find it interesting that you say you had to motor almost 3/4 of the time. If that were truly the case for long-term cruisers, how did the Pardeys manage to log so many miles sans engine??? That may reflect more on the boat's ability to move in light winds and to windward than it does on the reality of how much use sails are.
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Old 06-09-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
MilanoMyst-

I find it interesting that you say you had to motor almost 3/4 of the time. If that were truly the case for long-term cruisers, how did the Pardeys manage to log so many miles sans engine??? That may reflect more on the boat's ability to move in light winds and to windward than it does on the reality of how much use sails are.
I think it’s more a matter of the type of cruising. One was coastal and one was tradewinds. I sailed without an engine for many years and found that I needed to pick routes and destinations that permitted engineless sailing and I always need to plan a way to sail out of anyplace I was considering sailing into.
All the best,
Robert Gainer
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