Home Made Diesel Polishing System Q - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Engines > Diesel
 Not a Member? 

Diesel This is a forum dedicated to diesel engines and their applicable accessories.


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 01-25-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 4,998
Thanks: 5
Thanked 18 Times in 18 Posts
Rep Power: 11
wind_magic has a spectacular aura about wind_magic has a spectacular aura about wind_magic has a spectacular aura about
I don't know much about this at all, as should be obvious from what I am about to say and ask, but - wouldn't it be easier to disconnect the fuel line and then just pump all of the fuel into jerry cans so that the tank is empty, then spray the tank out with high pressure water or something ? I don't know how you dry the tank out afterwards, maybe compressed air ? Or just separate the water from the fuel later ? But it seems like it would be easy then to filter the fuel you took out when you are putting it back into the tank, same as you would if it was new fuel that was suspect. Am I talking crazy ?
__________________
What are you pretending not to know ?

Please support my
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 01-25-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 4,998
Thanks: 5
Thanked 18 Times in 18 Posts
Rep Power: 11
wind_magic has a spectacular aura about wind_magic has a spectacular aura about wind_magic has a spectacular aura about
Seems like truck drivers would have come up with a good way to do this, their trucks have big diesel tanks on them, same as boats. I seriously doubt a trucker would pay someone 300$us to filter their fuel, they must have thought of a better way.
__________________
What are you pretending not to know ?

Please support my
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 01-25-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: wherever
Posts: 5,262
Thanks: 8
Thanked 17 Times in 16 Posts
Rep Power: 11
xort has a spectacular aura about xort has a spectacular aura about xort has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by wind_magic View Post
I don't know much about this at all, as should be obvious from what I am about to say and ask, but - wouldn't it be easier to disconnect the fuel line and then just pump all of the fuel into jerry cans so that the tank is empty, then spray the tank out with high pressure water or something ? I don't know how you dry the tank out afterwards, maybe compressed air ? Or just separate the water from the fuel later ? But it seems like it would be easy then to filter the fuel you took out when you are putting it back into the tank, same as you would if it was new fuel that was suspect. Am I talking crazy ?
This is basicly the concept behind cleaning a tank and cleaning the fuel. You can use fuel instead of water to spray the tank. But the OP problem is they don't have an access port and they do have baffles.

There are companies out there with truck mounted equipment to clean tanks
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 01-25-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 80
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
motion300 is on a distinguished road
I believe if you put the pump in front of the filter you will kill your new pump Do you really want all th junk going tru your new pump?
When out in rough water is when I run my polishing system
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 01-25-2010
jrd22's Avatar
Courtney the Dancer
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: San Juan Islands., WA, USA
Posts: 3,817
Thanks: 3
Thanked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Rep Power: 14
jrd22 will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by wind_magic View Post
Seems like truck drivers would have come up with a good way to do this, their trucks have big diesel tanks on them, same as boats. I seriously doubt a trucker would pay someone 300$us to filter their fuel, they must have thought of a better way.
The difference is that trucks burn through the fuel in the tanks almost daily, it doesn't sit in the tank for months/years and give bacteria time to grow. Having owned a fleet of trucks I never had a fuel contamination problem (except when an employee would put gas in a diesel tank ).
__________________
John
SV Laurie Anne

1988 Brewer 40 Pilothouse

Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 01-25-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 94
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
SeaFever2000 is on a distinguished road
Andy,

What kind of an gine do you have? The reason I ask is that some of the diesels have a bleed valve and you could do some fuel polishing in a economical way by leaving the bleed valve open a bit.

I have a Universal M25 and I leave the bleed valve open 1/4 turn all the time. Hence when the engine is running the excess fuel is continuously running through the system (hence also the Racor 500FG) and being dumped back into the tank. Yes, this method does not take care of the crud at the bottim of the tank, but I thought I would mention it. I figured this out when I had the engine in my garage and actually saw what leaving the bleed valve open did to the working of the fuel system. Just a thought.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 01-25-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 80
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
motion300 is on a distinguished road
Here is what I have learned... If your fuel has sat a while( I don't know long, maybe a year) and you mostly sit on your boat, there is probably gunk in your fuel and If Murphy and his way and he always does you could have a problem. This will only happen when you are 20 miles offshore in 10' seas or trying to dock your boat in stiff winds with the whole marina watching Your motor will quit or at least do no more then idle rpm. You will probably knock off your bow sprit or at least damage your neighbors gold plater. From what I can learn , a proper fuel polishing will not only filters your fuel but cleans the inside of the tank as well This will require decent pressure spraying back in the tank. I can't see how one would accomplish this unless designed from building of the tank So I guess one would have to settle for a good fuel filtering system I have two tanks ,so when my tanks are low, I pump all the fuel to one tank then back to the other tank. That way I hope I have cleaned all the fuel Has worked well so far Now, I am going to try and reattach my bow pulpit
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 01-25-2010
jrd22's Avatar
Courtney the Dancer
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: San Juan Islands., WA, USA
Posts: 3,817
Thanks: 3
Thanked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Rep Power: 14
jrd22 will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeaFever2000 View Post
Andy,

What kind of an gine do you have? The reason I ask is that some of the diesels have a bleed valve and you could do some fuel polishing in a economical way by leaving the bleed valve open a bit.

I have a Universal M25 and I leave the bleed valve open 1/4 turn all the time. Hence when the engine is running the excess fuel is continuously running through the system (hence also the Racor 500FG) and being dumped back into the tank. Yes, this method does not take care of the crud at the bottim of the tank, but I thought I would mention it. I figured this out when I had the engine in my garage and actually saw what leaving the bleed valve open did to the working of the fuel system. Just a thought.
Most diesels that I'm familiar with (unfortunately I am not familiar with the Universal) return some fuel to the tank continuously when running through a return line (do Universals not do this?).

We have two tanks and a dual Racor filter with separate supply and return lines to each tank. I can draw from one tank and return to the other if I want, thereby polishing the fuel from one to the other. This does not agitate the tank and remove the gunk in the bottom though unless it's very rough while motoring, and it takes a long time (days) running to move any significant amount of fuel so it's not really very effective at polishing. I could install a pump (other than the electric primer we have) and with the addition of a couple of valves and a little hose I could run it through the filter and polish from one tank to the other.
__________________
John
SV Laurie Anne

1988 Brewer 40 Pilothouse

Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 01-25-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Gloucester, MA
Posts: 586
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
klem is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeaFever2000 View Post
Andy,

What kind of an gine do you have? The reason I ask is that some of the diesels have a bleed valve and you could do some fuel polishing in a economical way by leaving the bleed valve open a bit.

I have a Universal M25 and I leave the bleed valve open 1/4 turn all the time. Hence when the engine is running the excess fuel is continuously running through the system (hence also the Racor 500FG) and being dumped back into the tank. Yes, this method does not take care of the crud at the bottim of the tank, but I thought I would mention it. I figured this out when I had the engine in my garage and actually saw what leaving the bleed valve open did to the working of the fuel system. Just a thought.
Leaving the bleed valve open will lower your fuel pressure which is not ideal. Diesels already return to tank using an overflow valve. Typically around 90% of the fuel is returned to tank so it is already accomplishing the flushing that you are referring to.

If I was starting with a clean slate, I would filter all my fuel before putting it in the tank and then have 2 filters in parallel (racor makes some units that do this) allowing you to change either filter without shutting down the engine and pay for someone to polish the tanks with the proper equipment only when I had known contamination. Everyone has their own preferences but that is what I would do. It is not particularly applicable to the OP because they have a known issue in one tank and need it polished.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 01-25-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 80
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
cruisingmom is on a distinguished road
Thanks Folks for thoughtful input - here's some update

My engine is a Ford Lehman 80 Hp Diesel (4D254 - 2712E). I also have the ability to pull from one tank and return to another. I just bought a used Racor 500fg on e-bay for $51.00 so I thought I would split the fuel line going from my tanks to the main RACOR 500fg and have it go to a ball valve that I can open and attach to this new Racor 500fg then to the Walbro marine diesel pump and then back to a fuel tank (through the deck fill port). At 35-40 gph I can leave it run for several hours and turn over the tank several times. I agree that without agitation I will not get the crud off the walls, but hopefully I will be able to clear the lines of crud and at the same time remove any water from the tank. MY thought is to make this mobile unit set up so that I can do both tanks in the spring, and then also a tank after agitation at sea.
The Walbro pump was $120.00, so for about $200 I can make a separate polishing system that will not gunk up my primary Racor (hopefully) and can help to maintain the cleanliness of my fuel and tanks over time.
I guess I am trying to be belt and suspenders since I filter all fuel prior to adding in the tanks, but I know some water condenses during the cold maine winter and also there is some gunk build up at the tank t valves.
Andy
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
installing duct system for diesel heater and air conditioner levenezia Gear & Maintenance 1 09-25-2004 03:20 AM
Communications Made Easy Paul & Sheryl Shard Seamanship Articles 0 09-22-2001 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:06 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.