engine painting - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Gear & Maintenance > Engines > Diesel
 Not a Member? 

Diesel This is a new forum dedicated to diesel engines and their applicable accessories.


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 02-09-2010
bwindrope's Avatar
Break, curse, fix, repeat
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Bainbridge Island, WA
Posts: 267
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 8
bwindrope is on a distinguished road
engine painting

So my Universal M40 is low hours, runs great and is lovingly maintained on my Gulf 32, and about the only thing I haven't done is to deal with some external corrosion and rust. There is a bit of rust on the coolant reservoir and some chips and rust here and there.

It is not at all easy to degrease and de-dust and completely clean a boat diesel anyway, and prepping for paint sounds absurdly hard. Do people throw on some paint? Do people just spray on Boeshield or something once in a while?

What do people do?
__________________
Aeolus
Gulf 32
Bainbridge Island, WA

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 02-09-2010
Maine Sail's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Maine Coast
Posts: 5,135
Thanks: 8
Thanked 87 Times in 61 Posts
Rep Power: 15
Maine Sail is just really nice Maine Sail is just really nice Maine Sail is just really nice Maine Sail is just really nice
About every 5-8 years I remove any item I can from the engine over the winter, HX, alt, starter, manifold, gear box, brackets, valve cover etc. etc. and bring it home to the shop and completely strip, clean, prime and re-paint each item. Many items I will take to my dads barn where he has a sand blaster as it is just faster and easier..

I then use a dremel with the small scotch brite wheels and other spinning combos of Scotch Brite and brass wheels to go at what is left of the engine with it still in the boat. Usually there are only a few bad spots. I then prime the bare spots and use a liquid sand paper to prep the rest of the engine using microfiber rags for the cleaning and wipe down with liquid sand paper. I then re-install the valve cover and seal off the exhaust and intake ports, seal off the t-stat housing etc. and spray away. I spray in small bursts, take a break, spray, take a break etc. with a box fan sucking out. I always put two 3M pleated home heating system filter taped to the back side of the box fan to catch any over spray. This works well and in combination with the taping and prep I get zero overspray anywhere.

Once the engine is prepped I spend a couple hours masking, taping and getting her ready to accept paint. I then spray on some more factory finish, let cure and re-install everything.

Take your time and she'll look better than those crappy factory paint jobs..

This is what she looks like with 3k hours..
YouTube - Marine Oil Change With Moeller Fluid Extractor Pump
__________________
______
-Maine Sail / CS-36T


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




© Images In Posts Property of Compass Marine Inc.



Last edited by Maine Sail; 02-09-2010 at 11:06 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 02-09-2010
bwindrope's Avatar
Break, curse, fix, repeat
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Bainbridge Island, WA
Posts: 267
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 8
bwindrope is on a distinguished road
OH Jesus Mainesail, my luck you would be the first to reply and set a standard so high it makes any lessor effort seem silly. I literally cannot believe that engine has even been run before, not to mention 3K. Well, for one thing, mine does sit down in a deep bilge area, and although it is up on stringers, it is a collecting spot for all the dust and stuff that can fall or get sucked down through the floorboards. But still, no excuses, your motor is superbly clean.

I don't have that much dog in this race. Having just hoisted her up and replaced all my engine mounts, I have no appetite for any more major surgery, though I don't question for a second the efficacy of your approach.

I guess I am looking for a more, say, temporary measure. She only has 700 hours but is 25 years old (I've had her 3 years and put 300 of those hours on her). A truly beautiful job would require the Mainesail treatment, but in the meantime, any suggestions??
__________________
Aeolus
Gulf 32
Bainbridge Island, WA

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 02-10-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: wherever
Posts: 5,233
Thanks: 8
Thanked 14 Times in 13 Posts
Rep Power: 10
xort has a spectacular aura about xort has a spectacular aura about xort has a spectacular aura about
Rustoleum rust reformer can be painted on rust spots. The rust will turn black. Then use a hi-temp engine paint to touch up. You can clean with a light solvent to pick up grease and oil before painting. Mask off areas and wear a mask for you. Won't look as good as MS but will look better than what you have now. And it will stop the rust from becoming an issue.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 02-10-2010
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Of course, you can actually cook your dinner and eat it off of Maine Sail's engine... Nice job Maine Sail... Beautifully done as always.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 02-10-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Gloucester, MA
Posts: 584
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
klem is on a distinguished road
Wow, Maine Sail really does this one right. I can testify that not doing it right doesn't get you anywhere when it comes off in 2 or 3 years. I understand that you might not have the patience to take off all the auxiliaries and do a perfect prep job but dealing with rust and grease are imperative to getting the paint to do anything.

There is always the redneck way which would be to paint it with oil, put it in the bed of a pickup and drive down a really dusty road.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 02-10-2010
bwindrope's Avatar
Break, curse, fix, repeat
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Bainbridge Island, WA
Posts: 267
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 8
bwindrope is on a distinguished road
Question

I like that redneck way, as it hits close to home for my tribe. I remember the story that Rolls Royce would set out the iron blocks for their motors in the weather for some length of time. Never made sense to me...

Yes, you could eat off of Mainesail's engine. Hell, you could use it as a mirror. Seriously, there is more dust on the motors in the display room than on his. Yikes.

I'm a decent mechanic, and grew up covered in grease helping my (redneck) dad and other family fix and hot rod cars. I know what primo looks like, and it looks like Mainesail's. However, even though I understand all the arguments for a spotless engine, it ain't going to happen this year as the weather has been perfect for sailing here in the NW and spring is upon us.

So in the meantime (where I agree with Jimi H and Buddha, it is the groovy time), I'm looking at something more like the stop gap measure recommended by exort.

I'm still open to products and techniques other than Rustoleum, if there are any other recommendations.
__________________
Aeolus
Gulf 32
Bainbridge Island, WA

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 02-10-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 625
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 6
lancelot9898 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by xort View Post
Rustoleum rust reformer can be painted on rust spots. The rust will turn black. Then use a hi-temp engine paint to touch up. You can clean with a light solvent to pick up grease and oil before painting. Mask off areas and wear a mask for you. Won't look as good as MS but will look better than what you have now. And it will stop the rust from becoming an issue.
This is exactly the way I did my Perkins 4-108 last year, although I admire Maine's efforts and apprecaite all of his posts!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 02-11-2010
Mechsmith
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Almost Heaven West Virginia
Posts: 178
Thanks: 1
Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 5
Mechsmith is on a distinguished road
The reason for setting blocks out in the weather was to remove the stresses set up in the casting process so that when the block was set up for machineing it would stay put.

International also did(does) it and I suspect most other manufacturers do(did) also.

This is one reason that a good rebuilt motor MAY be better than new.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 02-21-2010
Dumah's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 61
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
Dumah is on a distinguished road
In actual practice a new engine casting MUST be "seasoned" before any machining is done merely to reduce internal stresses from the casting process. Depending on how finicky one is, (I'm not) one can degrease and brush on "tremclad" the engine doesn't care how it goes on just pay particular attention to sheet metal parts, valve cover, side pans oil pans ets, thest parts need protection worse than the block and heads.
Cheers, Dumah, Halifax, NS
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Runaway Diesel Engine Ben Hilke Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 07-19-2004 08:00 PM
Caring for the Cruising Outboard Doreen Gounard Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 04-22-2003 08:00 PM
Surveying a Diesel Engine Tom Wood Buying a Boat Articles 0 01-26-2003 07:00 PM
Surveying a Diesel Engine Tom Wood Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 01-26-2003 07:00 PM
Replacing the Diesel Engine Sue & Larry Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 06-12-2000 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:46 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012