Wrenching - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Engines > Diesel
 Not a Member? 

Diesel This is a forum dedicated to diesel engines and their applicable accessories.


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 02-27-2011
LakeSuperiorGeezer's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 551
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 4
LakeSuperiorGeezer is on a distinguished road
Wrenching

About turning a wrench, the other part of the learning besides studying the books is how to turn a wrench so that you do not bang your knuckles and take some skin off. Just think about where the wrench is going to go when you turn it. Better yet, have sockets with extensions and ratchets to drive it that put you above anything you can run into with your hands. Sometimes a nice jerk will get things moving. Of course when doing assembly, use a torque wrench because getting it correct is very important, too tight and you break it, not enough and it can come loose. Generally a mechanic gets large bolts not tight enough and small ones too tight. When using a screwdriver, it the screw is tight, put the screwdriver on the screw and just as you start to turn the screw, push yourself away using the screwdriver to do so. This momentum puts more pressure downwards on the screw than you can do by just pushing down on it. All you have to do is turn the screw a very little bit to break it loose so once you get it started, you can just turn it in the ordinary way.

Buy decent tools. It does not have to be Mac or Snap On, the really expensive tools. No need for the absolute best. If you look in a mechanics toolbox, you will mostly see Craftsman. I like twelve point sockets, but sometimes six point is what will turn the bolt that has rusted down to a smaller size, or even tap a metric socket onto a fractional socket. When it comes to rusty bolts that do not want to come loose, there are penetrating oils that will soak into the rust in a few hours and the bolt will come loose. Heating the bolt or nut up with a torch will also loosen it. There is also a tool called a nutcracker that tightens down on a nut that splits it down the side with a chisel like wedge driven into the side of the nut. Usually rusty fasteners are not a problem for the average mechanic but in a marine environment it can be more of a problem so I mention it here.

Get the shop manual read the manual very carefully. Have it there in front of you as you work. I copy the pages from the manual I am interested in and get thos greasy rather than the book. Usually an engine manual is an instruction book intended for the mechanic that is not familiar at all with the engine, or I should say someone learning to be a mechanic. Instruction covers things you would think would be in a general manual on engine repair, general knowledge, but there it is in a good shop manual, a self contained book telling you how to become a mechanic.

Last edited by LakeSuperiorGeezer; 02-28-2011 at 08:48 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 02-27-2011
Faster's Avatar
Just another Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New Westminster, BC
Posts: 14,627
Thanks: 68
Thanked 187 Times in 179 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about
My rule:

Always push a wrench with an open palm... and don't pull straight at your own nose!
__________________
Ron

1984 Fast/Nicholson 345 "FastForward"

".. there is much you could do at sea with common sense.. and very little you could do without it.."
Capt G E Ericson (from "The Cruel Sea" by Nicholas Monsarrat)
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 02-27-2011
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Quote:
Originally Posted by Faster View Post
My rule:

Always push a wrench with an open palm... and don't pull straight at your own nose!
Both good suggestions, but sometimes pulling is an evil necessity. BTW, pulling is better than pushing with a closed hand.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 02-27-2011
centaursailor's Avatar
Senior in age only!!!
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Balbriggan
Posts: 554
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 4
centaursailor is on a distinguished road
All good info, but it takes years of practice to get everything right.
I,v been at it for 40+years and still get the odd scrape. Getting the size right is the most important factor. Lots of slips are as a result of a using the nearest rather than the right size spanner.
Well fitted ring spanners are better then most tools but don,t suit every job.
Easing oil before dismantling if you have time helps. Working in confined spaces make care and planning more important than ever.
Never ever use vice grips or pliers instead of proper tools.
My son recently gave me a pair of fingerless "Kevlar"? gloves. They are great saving nicks and cuts.
Safe sailing
__________________
The great appear great because you are on your knees. James Larkin, Irish Labour Movement.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 02-27-2011
zz4gta's Avatar
I don't discuss my member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Chesapeake Bay
Posts: 2,441
Thanks: 0
Thanked 16 Times in 16 Posts
Rep Power: 8
zz4gta is on a distinguished road
It amazes me how many people don't know how to use hand tools. It amazes me even more how many refuse to wear gloves. After 5 years of building and racing cars, you realize how important your hands are.
__________________
Merit 25 # 764 "Audrey"
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 02-27-2011
LakeSuperiorGeezer's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 551
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 4
LakeSuperiorGeezer is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by centaursailor View Post
My son recently gave me a pair of fingerless "Kevlar"? gloves. They are great saving nicks and cuts.
Safe sailing
Where do you get those gloves? I want a pair!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 02-27-2011
bljones's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: South Coast Ontario
Posts: 8,135
Thanks: 32
Thanked 71 Times in 64 Posts
Rep Power: 7
bljones has a spectacular aura about bljones has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by zz4gta View Post
It amazes me how many people don't know how to use hand tools. It amazes me even more how many refuse to wear gloves. After 5 years of building and racing cars, you realize how important your hands are.
Ding, ding, ding! Mechanics gloves are cheap enough now, I've got a pair in every toolbag, and every vehicle. In addition to protecting your digits, you can also generate more torque when you're less worried about your hands coming to harm.
__________________
It's 5 o'clock somewhere:


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 02-27-2011
centaursailor's Avatar
Senior in age only!!!
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Balbriggan
Posts: 554
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 4
centaursailor is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by LakeSuperiorGeezer View Post
Where do you get those gloves? I want a pair!
He got them at work, hes a construction plumber. I see lots of different styles on ebay or try your local motor parts and tool shop.
Safe sailing
__________________
The great appear great because you are on your knees. James Larkin, Irish Labour Movement.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 02-27-2011
BarryL's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 1,599
Thanks: 3
Thanked 25 Times in 24 Posts
Rep Power: 12
BarryL is on a distinguished road
Good thread.

A few from me:
  • Use a 6 point socket instead of a 12 point (if possible). The 6 point is less likely to round the nut or bolt
  • Always try to turn the nut and not the bolt (this isn't always possible, but do it if you can).
  • Clean things before you start taking them apart. This way you will be able to see all the bolts that are holding parts together. You won't get dirt and grit into places they don't belong. It will be easier to find parts you drop. You will stay cleaner too
  • Don't use adjustable or 'monkey' wrenches. Ever. Your hands will thank you. The parts you don't break will than you. They don't call them 'knuckle busters' for nothing.
That's about it for now.

Barry
__________________
Barry Lenoble
Deep Blue C, 2002 C&C 110
Mt. Sinai, NY

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 02-28-2011
LakeSuperiorGeezer's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 551
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 4
LakeSuperiorGeezer is on a distinguished road
Hand Cleaner

I find that the usual hand cleaners are not very good at getting grease and dirt out from under and around fingernails. Scrubbing with a fingernail brush and cleaners with pumice still leaves crevices in the hand looking rather black with greasy dirt. However, I have found that if I take just a little of the BlueMagic 5215 Invisible Glove Protective Hand Coating and rub it into the ends of my fingers, that it leaves a film that fills these crevices on the hand and then hand cleaner takes care of the rest of the oily dirt. After application, I wave my hands around to dry them. I do not use this product over all of my hand as I find it a little irritating on the back of my hands if I use it a lot. It contains Water, glycerin, sodium silicate, soap, and fragrance. It leaves a strong film and I can feel what I am doing with my fingers which is not the case with rubber gloves
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:18 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.