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lonnieray 04-27-2011 12:03 PM

Priming problem
 
I have been unable to get fuel to the secondary filter by using the manuel priming pump after replacing both primary and secondary fuel filters. I have pumped at least a thousand strokes! Anyone have suggestions?

Lonnie

erps 04-27-2011 12:09 PM

It helps to prefill the filters with fuel before you screw them back on. Other than that, to move fuel with the priming pump, you have to have air tight connections on the suction side and a bleed screw open on the pressure side to allow the air bubble to escape. Have you been successful in the past in priming the system, or is this the first time?

mgalligan 04-27-2011 01:54 PM

type?
 
What make and model engine is it?

RichH 04-27-2011 02:49 PM

erps is correct.
It takes time for the filter material to 'wet-out' and for the entrapped air bubbles INSIDE the filter material to 'release' and dissipate. Starting out with 'soaked' filters or 'filled filters' will greatly speed up the air-shedding process.

Of course the re-assembly of the filter housing HAS to include no 'leaks' that allows additional air uptake.

;-)

MARC2012 04-27-2011 06:36 PM

Are you sure it is pumping,on most motors engine must be in certain position for it to pump.marc

deniseO30 04-27-2011 08:37 PM

Bad priming pump? Squeeze bulb in the line works great.

casey1999 04-28-2011 01:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deniseO30 (Post 724720)
Bad priming pump? Squeeze bulb in the line works great.

I would second that. I also added a fuel line (and appropriate fuel valves) just before the Yanmar fuel pump. What this does is allow be to use the fuel bulb to hand pump fuel from the tank, through the racor filter and then (using the engine fuel return line) run the fuel back to the tank. This removes all air in the racor and all the fuel line up to the yanmar fuel pump. When these line are full, I shut the valve that allows the fuel to go to the yanmar fuel return hose. Now when I hand pump the yanmar fuel pump everything before the pump is primed and a few strokes of the pump start fuel flowing to the yanmar fuel filter (open bleed screw). This makes job easy. Good luck.

RichH 04-28-2011 03:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deniseO30 (Post 724720)
Bad priming pump? Squeeze bulb in the line works great.

A squeeze bulb permanently mounted in a fuel line in the interior spaces of a boat would be high probable cause for your insurance carrier to drop or 'not acknowledge' your policy especially in the case of any claim that involved 'fire'.

deniseO30 04-28-2011 04:37 PM

I Know Rich, the boat came with it, wasn't mentioned in the survey, But made aware to me verbally, I'm not about to remove it. Many many other boat owners have them also; right near the "leaky" racor and sierra filters, which, if found leaking could also be reason for insurance not to Pay imho.

"Dear (your carrier) insurance.. I have a squeeze bulb on my fuel line..." My filters never leak, The fuel is never left to run down the engine into the bilge when purging air. There is also a propane stove, and a wood burning heater, and pre-code non tinned wire in my boat What do you think the cost of insuring my boat would be?" Is a letter that many a sailboat owner could easily author. After all.. insurance companies are in business to NOT pay.

casey1999 04-28-2011 04:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RichH (Post 724965)
A squeeze bulb permanently mounted in a fuel line in the interior spaces of a boat would be high probable cause for your insurance carrier to drop or 'not acknowledge' your policy especially in the case of any claim that involved 'fire'.

If concerned about that, then plumb in a valved bypass around the bulb. When not in use, the bulb will be isolated and no fire hazard.

I am not sure why the bulb would be a fire hazard (I understand it is no USCG approved) on my boat as when the engine is running the bulb is under vacuum. Any leak at the bulb will suck air and stall the engine (more reasons to have a plumb bypass). My bulb is also located at the diesel tank well away and islolated by bulkheads from the engine, and all electrical sources.

The bulb is actually safer than some installations where the install an electric fuel pump at the tank. I thought about doing this but any leak in the system will continue to pump fuel into the engine area or the bilge, and I would never know until the tank is empty and the engine shuts down. Also, being electric, the fuel pump could be ignition source for a fire.


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