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-   -   Cooling water - to screen or not to screen? (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/diesel/79489-cooling-water-screen-not-screen.html)

Classic30 10-05-2011 08:22 PM

Cooling water - to screen or not to screen?
 
I don't currently have one and was wondering if any here have set ideas on whether engine cooling water through-hull strainers are a great idea or not. These things - and their brass counterpart:

https://www.whitworths.com.au/products/83493_lg.jpg

I've heard arguments both ways:
For: They stop large rubbish (plastic bags, etc.) blocking the cooling system entirely.
Against: They're impossible to anti-foul properly and hence allow little nasties to accumulate, restricting cooling-water flow...

Which one is true in practice?!?

hellosailor 10-05-2011 08:51 PM

They're all true.

Now, would you rather use neverseize on the screws and clean that fitting out once or twice a season, or try to unravel plastic bags from your water pump?

BELLATRIX1965 10-05-2011 09:09 PM

Don't do it!!!
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by hellosailor (Post 783098)
They're all true.

Now, would you rather use neverseize on the screws and clean that fitting out once or twice a season, or try to unravel plastic bags from your water pump?

Firstly, I believe the "anti foul" comment referred to not being able to coat the INSIDE of the suction strainer against marine growth - which IS a concern, not frozen fasteners.

About a year or so ago, there was quite a thread on the "gear and maintenance" board about this very issue. Some very wise sailors (Mainesail among them) pointed out that if you have a screen on the outside of the hull, you cannot take the hose off and run a clean-out rod through the fitting from inside to outside (yeah, you will get a little wet!). You presumably have a suction strainer before your raw water pump, so it has plenty of protection. If you pick up a big plastic bag or something similar on the outside of the hull, the external suction screen will get clogged just as much as a simple through-hull opening will. Only difference is: you CAN'T rod out the through-hull from the inside with a suction screen blocking the passage on the outside!

After reading that past thread and giving this some thought, I removed my suction strainer on the outside of the hull. No problems to this point (knock wood!). Anyway, DON'T DO IT!!;)

hellosailor 10-05-2011 10:19 PM

bella-
"Firstly, I believe the "anti foul" comment referred to not being able to coat the INSIDE of the suction strainer against marine growth - which IS a concern, not frozen fasteners."
Two sides of the same coin. It is EASY to gob antifouling paint inside the fitting, but in order to paint it, as well as to clean out the little critters that don't care how well you painted it, it is still necessary to unscrew the strainer plate, at least during annual haul.
And you will not be able to unscrew it, certainly not with a slotted screwdriver while in the water, unless you've used neverseize. Or impact tools and the risk of collateral damage.
that would really be a place to have flush mounted dzus fittings instead of screws, if dzus fittings came in flush mounts.<G>

mitiempo 10-05-2011 11:50 PM

To add to what BELLATRIX posted, as long as the inlet hose leading to the strainer in the engine compartment is above the waterline you won't get wet.

I will be removing my through hull strainer at next haulout.

Classic30 10-06-2011 03:57 AM

I actually thought that the idea of these things was to ensure that any rubbish that came past was more likely to be washed away in the slipstream than enter the cooling hose.. but perhaps you have to be doing +50kts for that to happen. :rolleyes:

Quote:

Originally Posted by mitiempo (Post 783164)
To add to what BELLATRIX posted, as long as the inlet hose leading to the strainer in the engine compartment is above the waterline you won't get wet.

'Tis.. just.

Quote:

Originally Posted by mitiempo (Post 783164)
I will be removing my through hull strainer at next haulout.

I guess that's reason enough not to fit one then. :)

On the topic of rodding the hose out, how would I know there was something blocking the inlet? If I didn't get any water out the back end, my first thought would be to check the impeller - but that's after the strainer. Perhaps I should check the strainer first? Other than the cover being under serious vaccuum, how would I know to look elsewhere? Anyone had this actually happen??

I vaguely remember being told to take the hose off the strainer and blow - not try to shove something down the pipe..

mitiempo 10-06-2011 04:32 AM

Keep an eye on the temp gauge, if it rises check for water in the exhaust. If the flow is less than it should be I would check the strainer first as it both easier and faster than checking the impeller.

If it is a straight run or close to it from the seacock to the strainer either a smaller hose or a rod of some kind can be used.

downeast450 10-06-2011 06:42 AM

I replaced my thru hull strainer with an open thru hull last winter when I replaced my thru hull valve. I also added a large strainer and mounted it well above the WL. Finding space and building that mount was a challenge. The original thru hull was a flush bronze surface filled with small diameter holes. There was no strainer on the raw water side of the pump and I had added a small plastic one when I replaced the engine two years ago. It worked, stopping some grass. The new arrangement seems to work well. The strainer I now have looks large but it is easily serviced and is doing its job. I did push a small brush with AF paint up into the opening of the thru hull when I painted the bottom this spring.

boatpoker 10-06-2011 09:49 AM

Regardless of whether you install one of these screens or not, I strongly recommend you install a raw water flow detector. Should intake water be blocked for any reason the Raw Water Flow Detector sets off an alram instantly. By the time you notice the white smoke, rising temperature gauge or your overheat alarm goes off, much damage has already been done. Aqualarm makes a good one.

dabnis 10-06-2011 02:18 PM

Some time back we sucked up a large gob of kelp on the outside screen and I had to dive in 55 degree water without a wet suit to clear it. It would have been a whole lot easier and warmer to undo a hose long enough to hold above the water line and push the kelp out with a rod or smaller diameter hose.

Dabnis


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