Helm control panel question - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Electrical Systems
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree1Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 07-28-2013
dem45133's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 87
Thanks: 6
Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 7
dem45133 is on a distinguished road
Helm control panel question

Hello again all.

I still do not know why... but of the sailboats I've owned and those I considered, it seems they spread the gauges and controls all over the cockpit. I have no idea why but there must be a reason. On this Seafarer, the starting/engine panel is underneath the aft seat between your legs, the depth meter on the port back side of the cabin, the knotmeter in the base panel of the starboard cockpit seat... Why? Am I missing something being a novice? Part of it is probably to protect from sea spray I suspect.

Oh, I will be designing up some kind of hard dodger/pilot house also in the future, so all lines will come to me. I'm too old to be running all around the deck and my wife simply can't now. I always be sailing single handed. Thus I want the boat info and lines to come to me (so to speak) while I sit in the shade. (sorry you younguns... your day will come soon enough... before your even realize it, trust me) I really wanted a motorsailer, but can't afford or haul that heavy or pricy... so I'll make one out of this Seafarer sort of. I'll research that later on but the 1st step is a real console and thus the question below.

Since my Seafarer is a pedistal wheel boat I want to design up a whole boat clear covered monitoring console... all engine gauges (tach, oil pres, water temp and starting), depth meter, knotmeter and whatever else, moving map GPS maybe, into a single console in front of the wheel. It already has the pedestal mount compass.

Has any of you built up such an animal? Does someone make one that will not break the bank? Looking for sources and ideas.

Dave
__________________
1980 Seafarer Swiftsure 30
1978 Bayliner Buccaneer 270 (now sold and being restored in FL)
1962 SeaMac 14' Plywood Runabout, mahogany decked, with 1959 Evinrude 35 Big Twin (owned since age 17, I'm now 60)

Last edited by dem45133; 07-28-2013 at 03:45 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 07-29-2013
Gladrags1's Avatar
Sailor
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Rock Creek, Maryland
Posts: 589
Thanks: 10
Thanked 12 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 12
Gladrags1 is on a distinguished road
Re: Helm control panel question

Typically, engine instruments are grouped together on a panel created by the engine manufacturer and placed somewhere near the helmsman seat. Since you don't need to constantly monitor them they could be placed perhaps at a seat back to the side of the wheel. Probably wouldn't be blocked by someone sitting there due to the wheel being there. The other instrument gauges are typically placed around the pedestal, on pods mounted on the guard (a stainless steel tube attached to the wheel pedestal). There are lots of products created for mounting instruments there but you can create your own out of starboard or teak. Create cardboard mockups first to see how it will effect your vision. Do a google search for sailboat instrument mounts and you will find lots of options out there. Unfortunately, the mounts can get pricey but stuff can be made cheaply enough.

Tod
__________________
Mandolin
Bayfield 36
Sailing out of Rock Creek, Chesapeake Bay
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 07-29-2013
chucklesR's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Pasadena Md - Magothy side
Posts: 5,978
Thanks: 10
Thanked 31 Times in 31 Posts
Rep Power: 10
chucklesR is a jewel in the rough chucklesR is a jewel in the rough chucklesR is a jewel in the rough
Re: Helm control panel question

Dave,
I've done mine so everything is in one place. I used a Navpod system pod that provides me with a 20 inch by 13 inch surface.
I'm not 'done' yet, still need to add an autopilot control head, windlass switch and engine ignition.
Does it break the bank, not so much but it depends on the bank. You will understand your wiring, that much I promise.
I started with this:

And here's where I am now.
The gauges aren't fastened in yet in the photo, I had to quit for the day and wanted a picture - that's several months ago.


I also have a 12v plug on the back side, useful for fan's and such.
__________________
Lessons learned are opportunities earned.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 07-29-2013
dem45133's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 87
Thanks: 6
Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 7
dem45133 is on a distinguished road
Re: Helm control panel question

"Since you don't need to constantly monitor them they could be placed perhaps at a seat back to the side of the wheel."

Thanks Gladrags1, I'll start looking.. but I'll likely build up my own just because, but still look at the factory items for ideas. As for as your statement above... I am one who has had countless hours operating many types of equipment and working engines... scanning over the gauges every minute or so, is just part of operating whatever it is (power boat, combine, tractor, track hoe, semi truck, your local commuter, any thing with an engine really). If there is ever an issue on the engine... one needs to see it coming before its a big problem. The scan takes a micro second is all. Its hard for me to operate anything whose systems are not monitored.

I sometimes think people think little engines do not need monitoring... it still an engine working to its design... doesn't matter if its 1 cylinder or 24... its all the same systems and needs.

Thanks, regards, Dave
__________________
1980 Seafarer Swiftsure 30
1978 Bayliner Buccaneer 270 (now sold and being restored in FL)
1962 SeaMac 14' Plywood Runabout, mahogany decked, with 1959 Evinrude 35 Big Twin (owned since age 17, I'm now 60)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 07-29-2013
dem45133's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 87
Thanks: 6
Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 7
dem45133 is on a distinguished road
Re: Helm control panel question

Hello ChuckelsR

Yea, thats what I'm talking about! I love natural wood... its too bad no one (at least that I've found yet) that makes a clear wood finish that is UV PROOF.

Thanks.
__________________
1980 Seafarer Swiftsure 30
1978 Bayliner Buccaneer 270 (now sold and being restored in FL)
1962 SeaMac 14' Plywood Runabout, mahogany decked, with 1959 Evinrude 35 Big Twin (owned since age 17, I'm now 60)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 07-29-2013
chucklesR's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Pasadena Md - Magothy side
Posts: 5,978
Thanks: 10
Thanked 31 Times in 31 Posts
Rep Power: 10
chucklesR is a jewel in the rough chucklesR is a jewel in the rough chucklesR is a jewel in the rough
Re: Helm control panel question

Oh you can do it in wood.
I seriously considered it. My boat is a center cockpit so with the enclosure left on the wood is protected.
Previous owners aside of course. I just got the boat in March.

I'm with you and being able to see - and therefore know what is going on. My Yanmar 44 came with just dummy alarms - no gauges.
The idea that you should just go blindly along until the engine (for example) overheats and THEN worry about it is ridiculous. I want to know before I break it.
__________________
Lessons learned are opportunities earned.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 07-31-2013
PaulinVictoria's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Sidney, BC
Posts: 1,895
Thanks: 7
Thanked 46 Times in 45 Posts
Rep Power: 6
PaulinVictoria is on a distinguished road
Re: Helm control panel question

Make sure you can see over it
The main issue I've seen with these huge instrument pods is that a lot of people end up fixated on them and forget to look out of the cockpit at where they are going and what's around.
Generally, the stuff is spread all over the place because that's where the previous owners found it easiest to mount rather than necessarily the optimum position. New boats which were designed from the outset with integrated electronics tend to be more organised, where as your typical GOB had basic mechanical instruments mounted on the bulkhead and then went from there over the years.
knuterikt likes this.
__________________
Orange Crush
1974 C&C27 MkII

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 08-05-2013
Omatako's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Auckland New Zealand
Posts: 2,427
Thanks: 0
Thanked 28 Times in 25 Posts
Rep Power: 12
Omatako will become famous soon enough
Re: Helm control panel question

The primary reason why I haven't placed all my instruments on the binnacle is because when one is sailing any length of voyage (more than say 3 hours) one doesn't necessarily want to stand behind the wheel the whole time.

If your instruments are all there, that's where you have to be to see them.

A close friend has a new (2012) Beneteau and all the instruments are behind the twin wheels. He can see nothing of them unless he's at the very back of the cockpit. With the autopilot set on a three-day reach, that's the last place you want to sit, right in the weather all the time.

The only instruments I have at the binnacle are the steering compass and the Autopilot controller. Everything else is grouped together but where it can be seen from just about anywhere in the cockpit.

Just my personal preference, YMMV
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

__________________

"Two possibilities exist: Either we are alone in the Universe or we are not. Both are equally terrifying."

Arthur C. Clarke
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 08-05-2013
dem45133's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 87
Thanks: 6
Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 7
dem45133 is on a distinguished road
Re: Helm control panel question

Thanks... I'll think about that some. Maybe the whole console could be positionable for where ever one is sitting.

Dave
__________________
1980 Seafarer Swiftsure 30
1978 Bayliner Buccaneer 270 (now sold and being restored in FL)
1962 SeaMac 14' Plywood Runabout, mahogany decked, with 1959 Evinrude 35 Big Twin (owned since age 17, I'm now 60)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 08-06-2013
manatee's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: S.E. Florida
Posts: 913
Thanks: 16
Thanked 73 Times in 62 Posts
Rep Power: 2
manatee is on a distinguished road
Re: Helm control panel question

How much will the various 'gizmos' affect your compass as they are turned on & off in various combinations? Anything with electricity running through it sitting that close to a compass makes me nervous.
__________________
===========================
*
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
*
===========================

"The skipper should be the calmest person on board.
It is good for the morale of those around you. However, if everyone around you is frightened then be aware of the possibility that they know something you donít."

~~Dylan Winter,
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Helm Control spec2 Seamanship & Navigation 19 08-30-2010 01:20 AM
Troubleshooting LPG Control Panel RainDog Gear & Maintenance 7 09-28-2009 11:52 AM
A/C and Heating control panel pimhof Bavaria 0 03-02-2009 10:57 AM
heeling, weather helm and rudder control Randolph Bertin Learning to Sail 20 09-06-2004 06:03 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:32 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.