AC light fixtures - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Electrical Systems
 Not a Member? 
  #1  
Old 11-04-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 138
Thanks: 1
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 6
VallelyJ is on a distinguished road
AC light fixtures

I've gotten tired of dodging lamp cords at night and want to look into permanent 120v fixtures. But for some reason, I'm having trouble finding any.
Are there light fixtures--flourescent or incandescent--that are made for 120v AC boat cabin lights? Or, is there a DIY way to 'marinize' non-marine light fixtures to limit corrosion?
Or is it better to wire in an inverter and run the existing 12v lights off the AC that way?
Thanks for any help.
John V.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 11-05-2012
tdw's Avatar
tdw tdw is offline
Super Fuzzy Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 14,403
Thanks: 5
Thanked 67 Times in 62 Posts
Rep Power: 10
tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough
Re: AC light fixtures

Inverter takes e.g 12v and turns it to e.g 120v. You want, if I am reading your post correctly, to tone down your 120v to 12. That requires a transformer not an inverter.

Hardwiring in 120v luminaires seems like a singularly bad idea to me. At a guess 120v marine grade would be hellishly expensive and what happens when you are not on mains power ?
__________________
Andrew B

"Do you think God gets stoned? I think so... Look at the platypus." Robin Williams.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 11-05-2012
asdf38's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 691
Thanks: 1
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Rep Power: 5
asdf38 is on a distinguished road
Re: AC light fixtures

Quote:
Originally Posted by VallelyJ View Post
I've gotten tired of dodging lamp cords at night and want to look into permanent 120v fixtures. But for some reason, I'm having trouble finding any.
Are there light fixtures--flourescent or incandescent--that are made for 120v AC boat cabin lights? Or, is there a DIY way to 'marinize' non-marine light fixtures to limit corrosion?
Or is it better to wire in an inverter and run the existing 12v lights off the AC that way?
Thanks for any help.
John V.
Normally when on AC power your battery charger will be operating and supplying 12V to your whole system. It simultaneously charges your batteries and powers your loads (unless your loads happened to be excessive and then your batteries will start supplying current). So a regular charger essentially does what you call an inverter (which is the wrong term, as TDW says).

You're not providing a lot in the way of context here. Why do you have AC cords running through your boat?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 11-05-2012
hellosailor's Avatar
Plausible Deniability
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 10,620
Thanks: 2
Thanked 89 Times in 87 Posts
Rep Power: 10
hellosailor has a spectacular aura about hellosailor has a spectacular aura about
Re: AC light fixtures

Some folks have been very happy shopping at Ikea, where they have have strings of 12v "cabinet" lights that plug into a 120V transformer. On a boat? You just lose the transformer and you've got lights at an Ikea price.

But if you ever run on battery power, you'll behappier looking for brand-name high efficiency high performance LED lighting. Even Alpenglow has gotten into that. More money up front, yes, but less money charging batteries. And the good stuff really is brighter, and a nice color. The cheap stuff? Well, cheap enough to replace painlessly since it won't last as long, either.

But if there's an Ikea around you...go look at the cabinet lights.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 11-05-2012
tdw's Avatar
tdw tdw is offline
Super Fuzzy Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 14,403
Thanks: 5
Thanked 67 Times in 62 Posts
Rep Power: 10
tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough
Re: AC light fixtures

Quote:
Originally Posted by asdf38 View Post
Normally when on AC power your battery charger will be operating and supplying 12V to your whole system. It simultaneously charges your batteries and powers your loads (unless your loads happened to be excessive and then your batteries will start supplying current). So a regular charger essentially does what you call an inverter (which is the wrong term, as TDW says).

You're not providing a lot in the way of context here. Why do you have AC cords running through your boat?
Battery charger not connected to shore power maybe ?
__________________
Andrew B

"Do you think God gets stoned? I think so... Look at the platypus." Robin Williams.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 11-05-2012
Stu Jackson's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 790
Thanks: 0
Thanked 9 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 14
Stu Jackson is on a distinguished road
Re: AC light fixtures

Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
Some folks have been very happy shopping at Ikea, where they have have strings of 12v "cabinet" lights that plug into a 120V transformer. On a boat? You just lose the transformer and you've got lights at an Ikea price.

But if you ever run on battery power, you'll behappier looking for brand-name high efficiency high performance LED lighting. ......

But if there's an Ikea around you...go look at the cabinet lights.
We did just that in 1998! Diss the transformer and use the 12V lights. In fact, they used to have what they called "replacement" sets of just the lights with no transformer. Planned obsolescence? Who knew? OTOH, we STILL have the replacement lamps sets.

LEDs are nice, but you have to prove it makes sense with an energy budget. We hardly use any regular lighting to make any kinda dent in our daily use - the fridge is the "culprit."
__________________
Stu Jackson, C34, 1986, M25 engine, Rocna 10 (22#)
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 11-05-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 138
Thanks: 1
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 6
VallelyJ is on a distinguished road
Re: AC light fixtures

Thanks for the responses.
This year was the first time I was in a slip rather than moored, so I'm new to the shore power thing. I have a couple of 120v lamps that I plug into various AC outlets, hence cords in the way when I move around. Been bringing a battery charger from home and plugging it in.
I thought it would be good to have 2 or 3 hardwired 120v lights around. You're right, though--a battery charger running the 12v lights would accomplish the same thing as using an inverter to step 12v DC up to 120v AC.
120v marine wire is pretty expensive--buck and a quarter/foot at WM for 3-14.
A hard wired charger is the way to go.
Thanks for the Ikea idea.
John V.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 11-27-2012
Gunga Din
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Curitiba, Brazil
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Gunga Din is on a distinguished road
I've bought all my LED lamps at a chinese "free shipping" website, except the mast top one. All 12v and all working fine for more than an year. Very very cheap and very good light.
I bought the warm white ones and got a quite cozy light. Never needed to install the LED strips because the lamps were more than enough but they're a very good idea because they may solve some wiring issues as well.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 11-28-2012
chef2sail's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 6,965
Thanks: 29
Thanked 54 Times in 50 Posts
Rep Power: 7
chef2sail will become famous soon enough
Send a message via AIM to chef2sail
Re: AC light fixtures

We have two Alpenglow Cabin fixtures which is pleanty of light red or white. Each has two level;s and the Alpenglow LED are a soft white color. Best lights I have seen as far as color and brightness

http://www.alpenglowlights.com/compo...12393c80ff.jpg

Dave
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
___________________________
S/V Haleakala (Hawaiian for" House of the Sun")
C&C 35 MKIII Hull # 76
Parkville, Maryland
(photos by Joe McCary)
Charter member of the Chesapeake Lion posse

Our blog-
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


“Sailing is just the bottom line, like adding up the score in bridge. My real interest is in the tremendous game of life.”- Dennis Conner
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 11-28-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Narragansett Bay
Posts: 8,967
Thanks: 10
Thanked 135 Times in 121 Posts
Rep Power: 6
Minnewaska will become famous soon enough Minnewaska will become famous soon enough
Re: AC light fixtures

We have one regular 110v lamp aboard. It is in the salon, bolted through the bottom to permanently secure it to the shelf between our side settee. It is then hardwired through its base, presumably to a nearby 110v receptacle. It was professionally installed, so I don't know exactly where. Of course, it only works when on shore power or with the genset running (which we would never turn on just to power this lamp).

The 110v incandescent light bulb is much warmer and it operates on a dimmer. Its nice to have when you really only want a dim light to see enough to walk, say when returning from dinner or watching a movie or, on the other hand, when you really want to flood the cabin with light for a project or cleaning.

When we leave the boat at night at the dock, whether at home port or transient, we sometimes feel safer to leave a light on and give the illusion of someone aboard. We sometimes put the TV on too. Lots of unknown dockwalkers around. I am never comfortable leaving the 12v lights on, as the bulbs get extraordinarily hot and are buried inside the overhead. The 110v lamp is not in contact with anything.

Not a must have, however. You should have sufficient 12v lights to not require 110v.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Jeanneau 54DS

In the harsh marine environment, something is always in need of repair. Margaritas fix everything.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Upgrading screw base light fixtures to LED 4arch Gear & Maintenance 10 08-25-2010 12:23 PM
New parts vs. old fixtures jaschrumpf Gear & Maintenance 6 05-25-2009 07:33 PM
New Lighting Fixtures with Sensibulb LED's Willis Gear & Maintenance 4 03-23-2009 01:00 AM
Light Fixtures nickmerc Gear & Maintenance 2 03-20-2009 05:18 PM
Spreader Light Fixtures Freesail99 Gear & Maintenance 4 03-04-2008 11:37 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:25 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.