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Golfdad91 03-03-2014 09:46 PM

Blower hose
 
Today while replacing my blower on my just purchased Columbia 8.7 I noticed the hose connects to the top of the engine housing and the intake is at the bottom. I would think it would be the other way around.

BoatyardBoy 03-04-2014 12:48 AM

Re: Blower hose
 
22 Attachment(s)
The intake is at the bottom to remove any heavier than air low lying gases or vapors that may be in there.. It should blow the fumes out of the boat somewhere.

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Capt Len 03-04-2014 03:34 AM

Re: Blower hose
 
Propane and gas fumes tend to sink to the low bilge and wait there for you to start the engine. but you can put the sucking hose anywhere you want. Getting it wrong is entertaining.

Multihullgirl 03-04-2014 08:28 AM

Re: Blower hose
 
Golfdad91

Did or do you have a NACRA dinghy catamaran?

svHyLyte 03-04-2014 09:25 AM

Re: Blower hose
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Golfdad91 (Post 1589825)
Today while replacing my blower on my just purchased Columbia 8.7 I noticed the hose connects to the top of the engine housing and the intake is at the bottom. I would think it would be the other way around.

The hottest air/fumes in the engine compartment will be at the top while the engine is operating. One wants to remove that and have it replaced by cooler clean air that will be drawn into the bottom of the compartment by static air pressure. In most cases, you will want roughly twice as much intake vent area as you have discharge through a properly functioning vent/blower. If your engine is gasoline powered, you may need an intermittent blower/vent to the bottom of the compartment to run for a few minutes before attempting to start the engine as a matter of safety. Unless your boat has some serious defects, there will be no way that Propane fumes can reach the engine space. If they can, however, you have much more to be concerned about than where the exhaust vent is positioned.

boatpoker 03-04-2014 10:29 AM

Re: Blower hose
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by svHyLyte (Post 1590769)
If your engine is gasoline powered, (note: gasoline fumes are lighter than air) you'll want to run the blower for a few minutes before attempting to start the engine as a matter of safety. Unless your boat has some serious defects, there will be no way that Propane fumes can reach the engine space. If they can, however, you have much more to be concerned about than where the exhaust vent is positioned.

This is absolutely untrue !!!!!!!!!!

Gasoline fumes are heavier than air and this is why ABYC requires that blower exhaust ducts terminate as near under the engine as possible while remaining above normal bilge water levels.

Strongly suggest you read Safe Gasoline Engine Compartment Ventilation

svHyLyte 03-04-2014 01:08 PM

Re: Blower hose
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by boatpoker (Post 1590977)
This is absolutely untrue !!!!!!!!!!

Gasoline fumes are heavier than air and this is why ABYC requires that blower exhaust ducts terminate as near under the engine as possible while remaining above normal bilge water levels.

Strongly suggest you read Safe Gasoline Engine Compartment Ventilation

Actually you are correct and I shall make the appropriate change to my earlier comment.

Done!

olson34 03-05-2014 12:31 PM

Re: Blower hose
 
For gas engines, the blower exhaust intake must be at a low point in the engine compartment. As others have noted, gasoline vapor is heavier than air and extremely explosive.

For diesel engines put it near the top where the heat is concentrated, and if possible near the alternator (which is adversely affected by excess heat).

Loren


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