Refinishing Gelcoat - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Contributing Authors > Gear and Maintenance Articles
 Not a Member? 


Closed Thread
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 04-08-2001
Contributing Authors
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Posts: 158
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 15
Don Casey is on a distinguished road
Refinishing Gelcoat

I've just scrapped 20 years of bottom paint off my hull with a traditional double-edged paint scraper. Now that the gelcoat is exposed, how should I clean the hull and finish or reseal the bottom? Should I sandblast the paint off, or is it too destructive?

Don Casey responds:

Assuming you don't have blisters, which you didn't mention, then the next step is to wipe the exposed gelcoat with a wax remover—Interlux 202, Awl-Prep, or similar, using plenty of clean rags. Unless the hull was wiped down before the first coat of paint was applied—very doubtful—the gelcoat still has mold release residue which you will drag into the microscopic scratches you are going to make when you sand, and this will forever interfere with the bond of the paint.

Next, load your palm sander or random orbit sander with 100 or 120 grit paper and lightly sand the entire bottom to remove residual "islands" of old paint and to give the bottom uniform tooth. Wash the bottom thoroughly and wipe it with the solvent recommended for the bottom paint you have chosen. You are ready to paint.

A barrier coat on a healthy bottom is an unnecessary precaution unless you 're planning to take the boat to the tropics and use it there for several years. Even then, I would be reluctant to incur the expense, add the weight, and risk the consequences of adding additional chemicals into the mix until I saw real signs of osmosis.

By the way, good move in not letting the yard sandblast. Odds are shamefully short that your gelcoat would have suffered severe damage. Don't give up that benefit by sanding too heavily.

 

Quick reply to this message
Closed Thread

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:00 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.