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egent 06-20-2013 04:34 PM

Mast work
 
I am hoping to replace the masthead/foredeck light Saturday on my c&c 36. I bought a Harken Deluxe Bosun chair from West marine. My question is the the manual state a max weight of 220 lbs, and I am a bit more then that. How conservative is the manuals weight limit? Also would anyone be available, if the weight is conservative to help my wife take me up and down the mast?

Thanks for any advice and or help you all can give me.

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RobGallagher 06-20-2013 04:46 PM

Re: Mast work
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by egent (Post 1047030)
I am hoping to replace the masthead/foredeck light Saturday on my c&c 36. I bought a Harken Deluxe Bosun chair from West marine. My question is the the manual state a max weight of 220 lbs, and I am a bit more then that. How conservative is the manuals weight limit? Also would anyone be available, if the weight is conservative to help my wife take me up and down the mast?

Thanks for any advice and or help you all can give me.

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

The weight is probably conservative. However, it will be a work out getting you up the mast.

Do you have self tailers?
Can you hire the crane at your yard to bring you up? For a few bucks it's so much faster, easier and a bit safer.
Use a second halyard as a safety backup.
Pick a very calm day, any movement is magnified by the length of the mast.

Faster 06-20-2013 04:49 PM

Re: Mast work
 
Who was going to hoist you up there??? is your wife willing to go up? If so it would be much easier for you to hoist her up than vice versa.

We usually take the halyard and re-lead it to a primary sheet winch for more power - still it's a bit of a chore esp if the 'liftee' is unable to assist by pulling on a spare line and/or shinnying up the mast a bit on their own.

Also good idea to have a second line connected as a backup, - don't let it get too slack along the way - and remember to ease it as well when coming down.

With help and caution, often the halyard can be led to an anchor windlass for power assist.

As far as the chair/seat itself goes, not sure what to say about that.. I'd expect a decent safety factor and that the language in the manual is lawyer-ese CYA... but of course YMMV and I'd hate to be the one to 'discover' the real limitation.:eek:

MarkofSeaLife 06-20-2013 05:08 PM

Re: Mast work
 
I doubt I can wind 220 pounds up the mast.

One guy we put up was about 200 pounds and two macho tough killer gym machines (me and a mate) took it in turns to wind him up. did about 10 feet and switched. BTW thats the good way of doing it... wind like hell and switch without missing a stroke before you get tired.

Find some 10 year old kid off the streets and teach it how to use a drill ...

egent 06-20-2013 05:13 PM

Re: Mast work
 
Well at the moment it would be just the two of us, as we are relatively new to boat ownership, and don't know to many people to help. As to sending her up, this will get me in trouble, that word be even more weight that the chair is supposed to carry. My yard doesn't have a crane, not sure about the other marinas in the area. Any other suggestions for going up the mast other then a Bosuns chair?

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Faster 06-20-2013 05:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MarkofSeaLife (Post 1047052)
....

Find some 10 year old kid off the streets and teach it how to use a drill ...


"IT"???????:rolleyes:

Quote:

Originally Posted by egent (Post 1047056)
... Any other suggestions for going up the mast other then a Bosuns chair?

A mast tower can provide access, a tall pier at low tide (but you're on a lake??) If you can get alongside an accessible pier I've seen people rent a cherry picker or man-lift for a half a day... apart from the added cost that's a pretty nice way to get up there and feel secure with good access.

egent 06-20-2013 05:31 PM

Re: Mast work
 
I have thought about trying to get one of the 18-20 year olds from work, but I just don't know if I trust them to do the work right.

Not a lake but upper Chesapeake Bay on the Sassafras River. I'll have to see where the bridge sits next to the mast, maybe able to do it from there.

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Alex W 06-20-2013 05:32 PM

Re: Mast work
 
In my group of friends we all have a ATN Mast Climber that we use and share. It's so much easier for the person going up the mast to use their legs to get up there.

The Mast Climber is expensive, but building a self climbing system myself wasn't going to be that much cheaper (maybe saving $100).

I don't know what ATN's weight limit is. We also back up the Mast Climber with a second halyard and someone tailing it on a winch just in case.

knuterikt 06-20-2013 06:39 PM

Re: Mast work
 
I can hoist my wife up the mast. But I'm to heavy for her to hoist me (even using the genoa winch). So I have had to send her up the mast several times

I have been looking for a solution to get up the mast without hiring a winch gorilla.

I made this device from a old piece of plywood, a camcleat, two eye straps and some bolts.

It's movable step that I put on a dyneema halyard (dyneema so it wont stretch to much when climbing), the end of the hallyard are attached to the mast ring and winched tight.
I use a bosuns chair attached to another hallyard.
Standing on the step the hallyard on the bosuns chair gets tightend, then I lift the climber with my foots while sitting in the bosuns char. Repeat x times.

By using this device my wife only has to take the slack on the halyard.
Going down I release the cam cleat and bring the step down with me.

http://i372.photobucket.com/albums/o...tClimber-2.jpg

rbrasi 06-20-2013 07:40 PM

Re: Mast work
 
How much purchase do you have on the chair rig? I only have 2-1, and my 16 year old son hoisted me sans winches (using cam cleats). I weigh about 190. I think the load would be lessened quite a bit with a 3 or 4 to 1 block setup.


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