Crazying and Soft Spots on Deck - SailNet Community
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 5 Old 08-11-2004 Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 21
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Crazying and Soft Spots on Deck

I''m currently looking to buy my first boat and am still new to the repair and maintenance aspect of ownership. I plan on doing as much work myself as possible and have a few questions about crazying and soft spots. First, is crazying the proper term for little spiderweb like cracks on the deck?

It is my understanding that crazying of the gel coat is the result of stresses to the surface of the boat. Is this right? Places to typically look for crazying include stantions, toe rails, hand rails, etc.

Second, are soft spots the result of crazing? Am I correct that water will eventually penetrate through the cracks and create soft spots?

Lastly, how difficult is it to repair these things? I consider myself pretty handy around my house and car, but have never worked on a boat before. If the crazying and soft spots are on the deck is it neccesary to put the boat on the hard to repair?

Thanks for your help,

GarrettK
GarrettK is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 5 Old 08-11-2004
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 17
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Crazying and Soft Spots on Deck

garrett, i''m a green beginner just like you except i just purchased my first, a 27'' coronado,last week. i was told the spiderweb cracks on deck were merely signs of age in the gelcoat (or other such coating) and would come out with normal refinishing techniques. not to say there can''t be any damage of course.i know i''m short on facts but maybe this helps. someone out there,please correct me if i''m wrong. frank
wgwl13736 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #3 of 5 Old 08-12-2004
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 140
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
 
Crazying and Soft Spots on Deck

From Don Casey''s This Old Boat (paraphrasing his advice):

Crazing may indicate localized stress (near stanchions, for example). It''s a cosmetic thing, but getting rid of the crazing won''t solve the problem if you don''t eliminate the flexing problem first by reinforcing the section of the deck doing the flexing. More widespread crazing will typically be an older boat symptom; thick gelcoat that gets heated and cooled too often eventually cracks like dried mud.

Soft spots indicate serious problems. Most boat decks have a sandwich construction; older boats, anyway, tend to have two layers of FRP sandwiching a core of balsa or plywood. When moisture gets under the upper layer of FRP, the core softens and deteriorates due to rot or saturation. Repairing substantial areas of delaminated deck is expensive (if you are paying someone else to do the work) or involved and timeconsuming (doing it yourself).

Crazed gelcoat by itself is probably not much of a risk for water penetration to the core since it is merely an outer cosmetic layer over the FRP, but if water penetration has weakened the deck near screw holes and caused flexing which caused the crazing, it''s a moot point, anyway.

Allen Flanigan
Alexandria, VA
aflanigan is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #4 of 5 Old 08-12-2004 Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 21
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Crazying and Soft Spots on Deck

Thanks Allen, that was some information I was looking for. I think you just mentioned a new book I''ll have to buy.

Garrett
GarrettK is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #5 of 5 Old 08-23-2004
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Crazying and Soft Spots on Deck

Hi GarrettK,
I have a 1972 Gulfstar 43MS center cockpit and it has its share of leaks, soft spots, crazing and hull delamination but, it''s all doable. Crazing or stress cracks occur on all boats and especially on older boats. They are generally superficial hair line cracks in the gel coat. If they are larger than hairline, they enter into the realm of stress fractures and they will definately let water into the sub-structures (typically balsa, plywood, or a combination of the two) and this is what causes your "soft spots". You are literally standing on the gel coat and fiberglass pressing down into the area that once held the firm sub-structure materials. Now it''s either water soaked mush or rotted material that gives under your weight. There are many ways to repair the damage, ranging from drilling holes and drying the area with a heat gun and filling the vacated area with a special resin to cutting away the damaged area and replacing the materials with new sub-structure material and re-glassing. I''m a do-it-yourselfer and I started with the small projects like re-bedding the stantions, cleats, and portals. At the end of this season, I will start to tackle the larger areas and try my hand at replacing the damaged areas of my deck (soft spots). There are any number of books on the subject. One of my favorite series is by Don Casey. His books are full of illustrations and helpful instructions and "Sailboat Hull and Deck Repair" would be right up your alley. Hope this helps
SCSeaside is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome