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  #21  
Old 09-28-2013
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Re: Anchor Snubbers Redux

I too have been using the rolling hitch to attach my snubber to the chain. So far I much prefer this method to the chain hook we had previously. With its associated shackle and thimble clanking around on deck and when setting up it also limited us to that particular line.
With the rolling hitch we can pull any good dock line out of the locker to use.

One other bonus to using a rolling hitch is that if you find yourself in a position that you need to let out more chain you can just uncleat the one line and let it go in the water, tie your new snubber where you need and retreive the old snubber when you pull up anchor. I have never had to try this so I can't comment on how well that works.

I am still working on my rolling hitches as we rarely use a snubber because we only have 100' of chain, so when we do I am up on the bow with my knot book to make sure I get it right. I am sure our anchorage neighbours are comforted by watching this

So far it has always stayed tied and stayed in place and no clanking hardware!

PS, pretty sure I picked this method up from the previous anchor snubber thread and decided to try it, and found I like it.

Last edited by tjvanginkel; 09-28-2013 at 12:46 PM.
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  #22  
Old 09-28-2013
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Re: Anchor Snubbers Redux

Make sure you have a good bread knife aboard.

If that rolling hitch gets subjected to a long period of load it may be very difficult to undo. Ask me how I know this.
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  #23  
Old 09-28-2013
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Re: Anchor Snubbers Redux

Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
Why is the snubber hook under water? I only drop mine a few feet below the bow roller, tie it off and then release tension on the chain.
There are 3 schools of thought on bridles:
1. Short, just to unload the windlass. Your school.
2. Longer, to provide shock absorption. If anchored in shallow water and a strong wind and swell moves in, you'll be glad you have 20-30 feet of shock absorber. Otherwise, once the wind straitens the chain you have no shock absorption for wave impacts and the ride gets jerk and the forces skyrocket. Been there. One disadvantage is that the snubber may lie on the bottom in slack wind, falling off (chain hook), suffering wear or cutting. Kinda defeats the purpose of an all-chain rode.
3. Multihulls, which need long snubbers led to the bows.

There is certainly nothing wrong with school #1 if you never anchor in shallow water or in the open. But when you do, have a longer line available so that you can abandon the short snubber and connect a long one.

There is actually a 4th school, which I've been plying with. More complex, but the best of both worlds if the anchorage is shallow, the wind variable, and there is anything sharp on the bottom.

4. A long bridle anchored mid-ships or stern, then led forward to the bow. Chafe is an issue, but it allows the shock absorption of a long line without the snubber touching bottom in slack wind. It's simple to switch from #4 to #2/3 if the wind picks up.

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Last edited by pdqaltair; 09-28-2013 at 01:40 PM.
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  #24  
Old 09-28-2013
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Re: Anchor Snubbers Redux

Quote:
Originally Posted by TQA View Post
Make sure you have a good bread knife aboard.

If that rolling hitch gets subjected to a long period of load it may be very difficult to undo. Ask me how I know this.

So I take you prefer the simple chain hook? You have lots more experience than me so I am interested to hear your opinion on the pros and cons.

Regards,
Tanya
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  #25  
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Re: Anchor Snubbers Redux

Quote:
Originally Posted by tjvanginkel View Post
So I take you prefer the simple chain hook? You have lots more experience than me so I am interested to hear your opinion on the pros and cons.

Regards,
Tanya
I really prefer a simple hook, or a similar 'grabber', that can be slipped in an instant...

The main downside with a knot like a rolling hitch, or a soft shackle, is if it has to be undone in an emergency, when conditions are deteriorating... In a situation where your chain could be subject to snatching loads that could bring it bar-tight momentarily and unpredictably, one could easily be risking a serious hand injury having to deal with undoing a knot, especially when in an awkward position at the sharp end of the boat, or in the dark, and so on...

Here's a pic of my setup - the chain hook from Wichard, the snubber is a Yale Polydyne mooring pennant, coupled with a 'Cyclone Mooring Pendant' from NER:

New England Ropes Cyclone Mooring Pendant

Maxi-Moor II \ Nylon Core Polyester Sleeve Double Braid Rope | Yale Cordage

All I need is a quick tug on the lanyard to the locking pin, and the hook is free...






Last edited by JonEisberg; 09-28-2013 at 05:53 PM.
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  #26  
Old 09-29-2013
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Re: Anchor Snubbers Redux

Quote:
Originally Posted by tjvanginkel View Post
So I take you prefer the simple chain hook? You have lots more experience than me so I am interested to hear your opinion on the pros and cons.

Regards,
Tanya
I would hate to get that off in a hurry in a storm. In a storm or blow, the bow is pitching up and down and spray is going everywhere. Not a place you want to be for long. And as jon mentioned, the torque on that chain is easily enough to remove a finger, especially if caught in a gypsy. I like jon's setup, or you can just go cheap and get a hook like i did. I personally believe the hook is preferential to a rolling hitch.
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  #27  
Old 09-29-2013
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Re: Anchor Snubbers Redux

Quote:
Originally Posted by JonEisberg View Post
I really prefer a simple hook, or a similar 'grabber', that can be slipped in an instant...

The main downside with a knot like a rolling hitch, or a soft shackle, is if it has to be undone in an emergency, when conditions are deteriorating... In a situation where your chain could be subject to snatching loads that could bring it bar-tight momentarily and unpredictably, one could easily be risking a serious hand injury having to deal with undoing a knot, especially when in an awkward position at the sharp end of the boat, or in the dark, and so on...

Here's a pic of my setup - the chain hook from Wichard, the snubber is a Yale Polydyne mooring pennant, coupled with a 'Cyclone Mooring Pendant' from NER:

New England Ropes Cyclone Mooring Pendant

Maxi-Moor II \ Nylon Core Polyester Sleeve Double Braid Rope | Yale Cordage

All I need is a quick tug on the lanyard to the locking pin, and the hook is free...





Nice setup jon. My only concern is corrosion over time on the pin. No issues there?
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  #28  
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Re: Anchor Snubbers Redux

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruisingdad View Post
I like a long snubber with lots of room to accept the shock.
Skipper makes the rules. I get what you're trying to do. However, seems like a bit of overkill with that rubber snubber on there. The corroded chain hook seems like a potential failure that could cause a much greater shock.
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  #29  
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Re: Anchor Snubbers Redux

Quote:
Originally Posted by tjvanginkel View Post
So I take you prefer the simple chain hook? You have lots more experience than me so I am interested to hear your opinion on the pros and cons.

Regards,
Tanya
Yes I like the hook.

When I started out I knew very little about anchoring and copied what I saw the majority doing which was a chain hook on nylon line. On reading the gospel according to Lyn and Larry Pardey I tried a rolling hitch which works fine and as they say if you need to let out more scope you can just let the inner end of the snubber go and retrieve it when you retrieve your anchor.

But it was one wild night on the west coast of Scotland when I had been at anchor for a day or two and the wind changed and I was getting too close to another boat so I had to move. I could not undo the hitch and it would not go down through the hawse hole. It was an anxious 20 minutes as I ran back wards and forwards trying to find something to cut the knot while goosing the engine to keep us off the other boat.

So now it is a chain hook on 3 strand nylon rope. I use it over the bow roller. I have used it through fairleads but it creaks and groans more when it is blowing hard as the rope works over the fairlead. I have tried a V bridle and it is OK but still creaked and groaned so back to the single line. I usually have it adjusted so the hook is just above the water hanging down. Less corrosion. I have it on about 20 feet of rope and the plan is to use all 20 feet in bad conditions but I have never actually done this. My current one is stainles but galvanized hooks are fine and seem to last about 3 years before going rusty. Which is odd as the chain usually does 7 years.

I am currently at anchor in Grenada with many fellow cruisers and I think I see 3 maybe 4 hooks for every rolling hitch.

Last edited by TQA; 09-29-2013 at 11:57 AM.
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  #30  
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Re: Anchor Snubbers Redux

Quote:
Originally Posted by pdqaltair View Post
There are 3 schools of thought on bridles:
1. Short, just to unload the windlass. Your school.
2. Longer, to provide shock absorption. If anchored in shallow water and a strong wind and swell moves in, you'll be glad you have 20-30 feet of shock absorber. Otherwise, once the wind straitens the chain you have no shock absorption for wave impacts and the ride gets jerk and the forces skyrocket. Been there. One disadvantage is that the snubber may lie on the bottom in slack wind, falling off (chain hook), suffering wear or cutting. Kinda defeats the purpose of an all-chain rode.
S have been pondering this, and I think there is another school, that I think I am going to use next year.

Go short, have snubber tackle above the water, but use a Shockle as the shock absorption. They now have an anchor version that's rated pretty high.
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