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  • 1 Post By davidpm
  • 1 Post By miatapaul
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  #1  
Old 10-27-2013
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Rustoleum Transformations

I ran a search, and although there was some discussion, it wasn't clear that anyone actually went out and used it. I'm considering refreshing our galley and head countertops with this stuff - I'm not interested in getting heavy materials (both countertops are on the port side, and would weigh the boat down awkwardly). I saw the reviews on Amazon, and although no one would confuse it for granite, it really looks nice in the before and after views…

Assuming, of course, that we use cutting boards, and I know better than to put a hot pot on it, what do you think? We're not liveaboards - but we do use her to weekend and approximately every two years do a two week trip with her.

Here's a shot of the galley (this is a pretty old picture, but it gives an idea of the scope of work):


Here's the product (if you've never seen it):
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Old 10-27-2013
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Re: Rustoleum Transformations

What are you looking to do and why? Replace just the Formica tops? Formica is real easy to work with. From what I see all edges are covered wood, that can be removed and reused. You can buy, white Formica covered high density particle board, made for counter tops 4'x8' sheets, and maybe smaller quantities. Be careful not to buy a Melamine covered plywood. Looks like Formica, and they use it on the insides of cabinets, but it is a paint. Sound like you can handle the removal of the old counter, if so I would suggest removing it and bring it to a counter top maker and get a price. This is so small, I am sure it will not cost to have a replacement all sized up and holes cut for little money, and no headaches trying to get to fit.

Or remove the old, use it as a template and make your own. U-tube search for how to laminate Formica will help, it's easy to do.

And one last suggestion...I will get many eye rolls for this one. But I was a professional finish carpenter for many years and found that you can sand and old counter top with 80 grit and install new Formica over the old. You can do this without removing the existing counter. You will need to remove sink and any other obstructions, The Formica can run right over the wood nosing. You maybe able to barrow or rent the router you will need. You well need to make a pattern and dry fit the new Formica. Cut the sink hole out after glued down.

You will have issues using that preformed counter top. Look at the under side of it and you will see. Back splash will have to be cut off, and it looks like you need a wider top to cover the "L" shape. Cutting a per-laminated top or sheet is not easy to do without chipping. Biggest mistake made is the sink hole is not a square or rectangular hole. The corners are rounded and the hole need to match those curves.

Taking a second look at is project...you have a storage locker in the middle of that top, I have one that is an ice chest. If you plan on keeping that feature, and I'm sure you do, it makes it project a lot more complicated. I suggest bringing to a professional counter top maker.

If you need more info, let me know. Good luck.
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Last edited by Delta-T; 10-27-2013 at 10:53 AM.
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Old 10-27-2013
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Re: Rustoleum Transformations

I found this review



It seems to me to be a product looking for a nitch.

Doing real laminate especially for such a small area is not hard to do yourself and probably not expensive to have someone else do if you don't have a router or laminate trimmer.

I agree With Delta-T
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Old 10-27-2013
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Re: Rustoleum Transformations

Quote:
Originally Posted by Delta-T View Post
And one last suggestion...I will get many eye rolls for this one. But I was a professional finish carpenter for many years and found that you can sand and old counter top with 80 grit and install new Formica over the old. You can do this without removing the existing counter. You will need to remove sink and any other obstructions, The Formica can run right over the wood nosing. You maybe able to barrow or rent the router you will need. You well need to make a pattern and dry fit the new Formica. Cut the sink hole out after glued down.
I have done this I am not sure I even sanded the old white with gold flaked 1950's counter top (though the top layer likely wore off years before anyway) and it lasted 10 years till we moved and still looked new. I removed the counter and glued the hole sheet down with overlaps and cut an edge with a standard router. You could not tell it was not professional. Cost me like 45 dollars for a 4X8 sheet at home depot.

If you can get the wood off the this should be much easier than painting. Better finish in the end, and more durable in the end.
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Old 10-27-2013
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Re: Rustoleum Transformations

Try it. if it doesn't work, or only lasts a few years, you can always replace the laminate later.
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