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  #11  
Old 09-29-2004
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Best way to remove barrier coat

I just finished doing a similar job on my boat. The PO had put barrier coat over old bottom paint, and it was peeling pretty badly. A real mess to get off.

I found two products capable of touching the old barrier coat. One was a 36 grit sanding pad running on a random orbital sander-used GENTLY! You can get them from the Jamestown catalog if Sailnet doesn''t stock them.

The other was Interlux''s Interstrip (239?). That stuff WILL even soften epoxy. Again however, use it sparingly. I used it to remove a cove stripe that was really thick, and hard to get to. On the places where it sat on the bare gelcoat, it left a swelled spot a few thousanths high, but noticeable.

Peel away didn''t work for me.

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Old 06-16-2010
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Just this year I my bottom redone by Osprey Marine Composites. Many people say they are the best in the Annapolis area. I was having a few blisters pop up each year. They did a laminate profile to figure how deep the water penetration was - fortunately it wasn't very deep. They peeled a layer of fiberglass using their planer (on the the shallowest setting - they didn't need to add any new fiberglass on top aferwards). The planer leaves a fairly rough surface. Then they sanded everything smooth. What they told me about sanding was that the heat helps dry out any moisture remaining on the outer layer of glass. The hull was very dry on the moisture meter when they were done.

The pros remove paint and barrier coat by soda blasting. They use a planer if needed to get down to dry fiberglass. Then they sand. Finally apply barrier coat and paint. They do all this because it is absolutely critical to apply barrier coat to a dry substrate that has been tested with a meter!!!!

They considered the heat from sanding to be a good thing. I imagine if you took this to an extreme you could do some damage.
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Old 06-16-2010
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It's all in the application. Before I would put barrier coat over bare glass substrate, I would put a layer of straight epoxy on, then the barrier coat after sanding that smooth.
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Old 06-16-2010
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Hey Charlie, How would you get Interprotect (or something like it) off a wood hull? Sand or heat gun and scrape?
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Old 06-16-2010
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Interprotect is epoxy, as far as I understand. It means you cannot use chemicals to strip it from the hall. The only ways are - a "planner", or scraping/sanding.

Regards.
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Old 06-16-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westerly33 View Post
Interprotect is epoxy, as far as I understand. It means you cannot use chemicals to strip it from the hall. The only ways are - a "planner", or scraping/sanding.

Regards.
Sure is- It will come off with a heat gun (like any epoxy). I'm just curious which is more efficient.
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Old 06-16-2010
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It's so cute to hear guys talking about the their bottoms for a change !
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Old 06-17-2010
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Moonie asked me to comment on my earlier post. Like most people who have been into boats for a while, at some point I became very concerned about the whole the blister issue. I began reading everything that I could lay my hands on which discussed the causes and cures for blistering. What became very apparent was that there were a whole range of causes for blistering, some fairly benign (such as poor adhesion between the gelcoat and the laminate) and some very dangerous to the overall structural integrity of the boat.

In this last category are issues which are directly related to the formulation of the resin or additives such as accelerators mixed into the resin by the boat manufacturer. These last set of causes vary from a slow loss of ductility in resins allowing micro fissuring, and a range of other causes which include continued chemical processes within the laminate.

According to my readings in this second case, there can be a variety of chemical reactions at work. In some cases there are larger than normal trace amounts of water soluble materials that are formed as the byproducts of the reaction or suspended in un-reacted resin.

In those cases these water soluble chemicals can react with the water to form acids or else leech out over time and leave the resin more pourous than it initially was thereby allowing water molecules to get further into the laminate and allowing hydrolysis and the formation of acidic fluid deeper in the laminate than it might form otherwise. This was cited as one possible cause of deep blistering occuring in an older boat which had not experienced blistering earlier.

In at least some of the articles that I read, heat was seen as posible cause of later onset blistering and deep blistering. In my reading, I came across several case studies that discussed boats that were taken blister free from cooler water to the tropics and immediately began to have blister problems. My recollection is that even small amounts of heat can cause an accellerated reaction of some of the previously unreacted resins thereby forming water solubles and or microfisuring within these portions of the laminate.

In some of the discussions that I read, as a part of the research, the blistering process was purposely accellerated by soaking the laminate in warm water.

I am not a chemist and have not actually done any primary research on these theories, so I personally cannot tell you whether these theories are accurate, but to the best of my recollection the articles where I read these theories were either based on practical experience for the most part appeared to be science based. If someone has a better source of information on the relationship between heat and blistering, I would certainly be interested in being corrected.

Respectfully,
Jeff
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cormeum View Post
Hey Charlie, How would you get Interprotect (or something like it) off a wood hull? Sand or heat gun and scrape?
Most epoxies are immune to strippers but a heat gun and scraper will remove it. Follow with sanding afterwards but be careful not to remove too much wood or put flat spots in it. I hope ya have some good long boards....
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