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-   -   Muscling the Motor onto the Outboard Bracket (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/105213-muscling-motor-onto-outboard-bracket.html)

sparrowe 10-31-2013 10:56 PM

Muscling the Motor onto the Outboard Bracket
 
The Lehr 5 HP propane outboard that I bought back in June comes out of the shop this weekend. (Its reliability is another thread entirely.) I'm looking for your thoughts about the ways I might get it from the cart onto the transom without it or me taking a swim. The motor is not particularly heavy - maybe 58 LBs - so one option is just to muscle it off the cart, step on the boat from the dock, and lower it onto the transom bracket. But, given my advanced age and size (not to mention being out of shape), there is the possibility that something could go awry - especially at the moment when I have one foot on the finger pier, the other on the rear corner of the boat, and am dangling the motor over the transom hoping to gingerly lower it onto the outboard bracket.

A second option might be for my wife and me to carry the motor and set it in place together, one on each side, one of us standing in the boat and the other either on the finger or straddling the finger and the boat. That could work, but if we screw up our coordination both of us and the motor could end up in the drink.

A third option might be like this: detach and pull the mainsail halyard over to the finger pier, attach it to the outboard motor, and with the halyard on the winch have my wife begin cranking. As the halyard takes up slack, I grab the motor and guide it along the rail and then over the transom. (If there isn't enough mechanical advantage I could rig a block and tackle between the halyard and the motor.) My wife lets some slack on the winch, gradually lowering the motor as I guide it onto the outboard bracket. On this option, I'm not supporting the full weight of the motor, just guiding it into place. My wife has the mechanical advantage of the winch (and block and tackle). But here's the question: would you suspend a 58 lb outboard on your main halyard? (More info: our boat is a Beneteau 210, fractional rig, aluminum mast of approximately 30' height.)

Thoughts? Ideas?

Thanks!

Ray

jimgo 10-31-2013 11:07 PM

Re: Muscling the Motor onto the Outboard Bracket
 
What I did with our 90lb Tohatsu was to carry it aboard our Catalina 25. I fed out enough of the main halyard so that, when under tension, the halyard passed over the stern rail and down to about where I expected the carry handle to sit. I then tied off the halyard and double-checked the length. I attached the halyard shackle to the carry handle, then lifted the engine over the rail and down, bending over the rail until I got it onto the outboard bracket. I did this 3 or 4 times, and always by myself. If I had a helper, I would have had both of us aboard the boat, one above the stern rail (me) and one below the rail. Having someone down there would have made it MUCH easier to guide the engine onto the mount, and it would have allowed me to more easily transition from getting the engine over the trail to getting down and easing the engine onto the mount. Of course, if your engine fits between the rail and the transom, then life is even easier for you. Put down some towels to protect the hull, and just slide it through with the halyard attached and with your wife keeping just a BIT of slack on the line.

attached the main halyard to the handle

davidpm 10-31-2013 11:16 PM

Re: Muscling the Motor onto the Outboard Bracket
 
Since this is sailnet whatever you do it is mandatory that you find someone to video the process for us. :)

It's a win win. If it works its an instructional video.
If it doesn't work well its still an instructional video.

deniseO30 11-01-2013 12:14 AM

Re: Muscling the Motor onto the Outboard Bracket
 
Geeze just ask for some help! Is it really that hard to ask for help? I just asked my club members to help pull my boat.. 5 guys showed up on a rainy day! I'm 5 Xs blessed as I see it :)

PaulinVictoria 11-01-2013 01:12 AM

Re: Muscling the Motor onto the Outboard Bracket
 
I lifted my 80lb 4-stroke Honda twin on and off a few times. just tied a bit of rope through the handle and around the base of my pushpit to catch it if I dropped it. Don't overthink things :)

seafrontiersman 11-01-2013 07:46 AM

Re: Muscling the Motor onto the Outboard Bracket
 
I found that the easiest way for me was to use my boom/topping lift and a short piece of stout rope tied to the boom with a clove hitch on one end running through the motor mount and the other end tied with a rolling hitch. Pick her up, swing her over, let her down, done!
Good luck!

svHyLyte 11-01-2013 09:22 AM

Re: Muscling the Motor onto the Outboard Bracket
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by seafrontiersman (Post 1113186)
I found that the easiest way for me was to use my boom/topping lift and a short piece of stout rope tied to the boom with a clove hitch on one end running through the motor mount and the other end tied with a rolling hitch. Pick her up, swing her over, let her down, done!
Good luck!

Good suggestion. The ships boom with a tackle to the outboard, if necessary should be all you need to get the motor on board the boat. In terms of lifting the engine onto the bracket, ensure you secure a tether to the powerhead such that if you do "loose it", the engine is not going into the drink. (It might be wise to purchase a lifting bridle for the engine from Defender or West Marine as they do come in handy for that.) For moving the engine around on board, one can buy a round Teflon furniture pad at Lowes or Home Depot that you can rest the drive/prop on and use to simply slide the motor along the deck.

azguy 11-01-2013 09:32 AM

Re: Muscling the Motor onto the Outboard Bracket
 
If you are that concerned I would ask for help a 5hp/60lb motor is child's play for one strong guy.....

eherlihy 11-01-2013 11:14 AM

Re: Muscling the Motor onto the Outboard Bracket
 
If you have a Lifesling aboard, you should also have the Lifesling lifting tackle to help retrieve a victim. These are either 3:1 or 5:1 blocks which attach to a halyard, or the boom to lift a victim over the lifelines, and back aboard.

You could also use the Lifesling lifting tackle in conjunction with the halyard/boom and an outboard motor lifting sling to help manage the 58lb Lehr. This should allow one person to rig the tackle, and then, easily, lift and guide the motor to its mount.

Forgive me but, I love that I can lift my Mercury 3.3 2-stroke with one hand, because it only weighs 30lbs with a full tank of gas. :)

eherlihy 11-01-2013 11:16 AM

Re: Muscling the Motor onto the Outboard Bracket
 
D- Guys don't ask for directions, or help in handling their stuff - ever.

You wouldn't know this because it's in the guy manual... This is right after the section that tells us that it is wrong to operate the grill without an adult beverage in at least one hand. Also, It's just before the section that tells us to always come to the assistance of a damsel in distress - which is why you get 5 guys to help you.


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