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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #1  
Old 01-30-2005
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Westerbeke 4-107

Can anyone tell me about the 4-107?
On the Westerbeke site diesel chart at:

http://www.westerbeke.com/technical/Engine%20Replacement%20Guide%207%2D21%2D04%2Ehtm

it seems to footnote the 4-107 as the W40 with 40HP. I also found a Navy Engineering page here:

http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/navy/docs/swos/eng/62B-416.html

That shows the 4-107 at 25HP.
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Old 01-31-2005
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Westerbeke 4-107

I don''t know if this will answer your question, but I just installed a Westbeke 44B-four, which is a 4 cyl, 107 cu inch displacement engine with a rated horsepower in the range of 40+.

I was told the Perking 4-107 was sold off to Universal and became the M40. Then, Westerbeke/Universal had some sort of merger and it then makes sense that the engine is listed as the W40. Talking to my mechanic, many companies now swap blocks and parts, so it is difficult to actually tell who is making what. For example, my 44B-four is built on a Mitsubishi manufactured block.

I am assuming, per your quoted westerbeke chart, that the engines hightlighted in grey are current models in production. If that is the case and your choices are the M-40 (Universal) or the 44B-four (Westerbeke), my dealer told me flat out that he would not sell me the universal, as the difference in noise is very noticable, the westerbeke being much quiter. Plus, the 44B-four is truely 107 cid, instead of 82 cid on the M-40. It is a very smooth running, powerful, and relatively quiet engine. I like it.

Don''t know if this helps, but hope it partically answers you question.
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Old 02-02-2005
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Westerbeke 4-107

Trek, I think Nereus32 has summed it up nicely. And in the hopes this might add an additional data point for you, I recently spoke with a Scot who repowered his Pearson 40, which was previously powered with a 4-107. He also chose the new W-44B and he was very pleased. As you probably know, the P40 was way overbuilt for its intended purpose and is roughly a 11-ton boat. He commented that the engine was much quieter, far smoother and a great deal more powerful; as I recall, he had a fixed 3-blade prop. Also, he found the geometry on the 44B to make it a suitable 4-107 replacement. Hope that helps...

Jack
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Old 02-02-2005
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Westerbeke 4-107

Thank you both for your help,
Joe
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Old 04-12-2013
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Re: was; Westerbeke 4-107 Now; Westerbeke W44Bfour

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nereus32 View Post
I don''t know if this will answer your question, but I just installed a Westbeke 44B-four, which is a 4 cyl, 107 cu inch displacement engine with a rated horsepower in the range of 40+.

I was told the Perking 4-107 was sold off to Universal and became the M40. Then, Westerbeke/Universal had some sort of merger and it then makes sense that the engine is listed as the W40. Talking to my mechanic, many companies now swap blocks and parts, so it is difficult to actually tell who is making what. For example, my 44B-four is built on a Mitsubishi manufactured block.

I am assuming, per your quoted westerbeke chart, that the engines hightlighted in grey are current models in production. If that is the case and your choices are the M-40 (Universal) or the 44B-four (Westerbeke), my dealer told me flat out that he would not sell me the universal, as the difference in noise is very noticable, the westerbeke being much quiter. Plus, the 44B-four is truely 107 cid, instead of 82 cid on the M-40. It is a very smooth running, powerful, and relatively quiet engine. I like it.

Don''t know if this helps, but hope it partically answers you question.
Hi Nereus32,
I know this is an old post, but I am in a dilemma!!!
I have, last year removed the 4-107 and replaced it with a W42B four, as you have done... Please tell me what transmission did you use???
The reason I ask is; I bought a rebuilt 42B with a BWH 150A trans, the ratio is 2.65:1, when I took it out for a test run, the engine was running at 3000 RPM's and going 2 knots!!! So what I did was take out the V drive had Walter gear rebuild it and re gear it to a 1:1 ratio, now the boat will only run up to 1100 RPM's and that is it, it while not go over 1100!!!
I have tried to install a Velvet drive direct drive trans, but it mounted to the engine above the floor boards with only an inch to drop on the engine mounts, I had to send it back...
Hope to hear from you...
TIA
Larry
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Old 04-26-2013
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Re: Westerbeke 4-107

Mine came with a PRM Newage 120 (PRM Marine Ltd) with roughly a 2:1 reduction, which was appropriate for my boat and the prop I swing. One thing about the 44B-four: I never calibrated my panel, as it requires a timing gauge that I don't have. With a theoretical max rpm of 3000, I know my gauge is wrong, but I never had any issues, so I didn't really ever bother.

Funny, I was researching impellers, as my boat has been high and dry for a while now and I want to get it out of moth balls soon. This post came up in my search, otherwise, I'd of never found your question. LOL.
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Old 04-26-2013
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Re: Westerbeke 4-107

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nereus32 View Post
Mine came with a PRM Newage 120 (PRM Marine Ltd) with roughly a 2:1 reduction, which was appropriate for my boat and the prop I swing. One thing about the 44B-four: I never calibrated my panel, as it requires a timing gauge that I don't have. With a theoretical max rpm of 3000, I know my gauge is wrong, but I never had any issues, so I didn't really ever bother.

Funny, I was researching impellers, as my boat has been high and dry for a while now and I want to get it out of moth balls soon. This post came up in my search, otherwise, I'd of never found your question. LOL.
This procedure might help.

Checking the Accuracy of a Tachometer.

There is a way to check the accuracy of a tachometer using the highly accurate and stable frequency of AC power supplied from any source of commercial shore power. The concept is to use the AC line frequency as the measuring standard. The only tools needed for this calibration check are a piece of tape and a fluorescent lamp which operates from commercial AC line power.

A fluorescent lamp is actually a gas-discharge lamp with the interior of the glass envelope coated with a light-emitting phosphor. When the gas within the lamp is ionized by alternating current it emits pulses of energy. One pulse occurs for each of the voltage excursions of the AC waveform. For the 60-Hz power common in North America, there will be 120 such flashes per second, 60 positive and 60 negative. The pulses of energy created within the lamp excite the phosphor coating, which in turn emits visible light. Because the energy driving the lamp is not continuous, the light emitted is not continuous. The fluorescent lamp emits 120 pulses of light per second, but the human eye's persistence of vision makes us think the light is always on. We can use the pulsing light output of the fluorescent light as a very accurate measuring tool with which to check the calibration of the engine tachometer.

First, obtain access to the front of the engine. Place one piece of white tape on the face of the large pulley mounted on the engine's crankshaft (usually this is the largest pulley in sight). Illuminate the front of the engine with light from the fluorescent lamp. Run the engine at 1,800 rpm, as shown on the tachometer. If the tachometer is accurate, four stationery, or very slowly moving, white marks will appear on the face of the pulley where the tape was placed. If the tachometer is inaccurate, the tape marks may be rotating in either direction. Adjust the throttle until the four tape marks appear to stand still. Note the tachometer reading. If the difference between the reading and 1,800 rpm is at all significant, look for a small adjustment screw on the back or within the body of the tachometer. Turning this screw slightly should make the indicator needle move to exactly 1,800 rpm. If the speed range of the engine permits, increase the engine speed to 3,600 rpm. At this speed, only two tape marks should be visible on the crankshaft pulley. Repeat the check of the tachometer reading and, if necessary, readjust the tach. The basis of this stroboscopic speed calibration is quite simple. At 1,800 rpm, the engine is turning at 30 revolutions per second. The lamp is flashing at 120 flashes per second, or four flashes per engine revolution. Therefore, if the engine is turning at exactly 30 revolutions per second the tape mark will appear four times, with each apparent tape position 1/120 of a second or 1/4 revolution apart. When the engine runs at 3,600 rpm there will be only two light flashes per engine revolution. If the boat is in a country where the standard AC power frequency is 50 Hz, the check speeds would have to be 1,500 and 3,000 rpm since the light would flash 100 times per second.
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