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Old 12-29-2013
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Protective coatings for splices and stitching

Maxijacket is highly regarded. Are there other coatings or protective materials worth trying?

Bear in mind some coatings could damage line, depending on ingredients.
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Old 12-29-2013
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Re: Protective coatings for splices and stitching

Heart shrink tubing.
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Re: Protective coatings for splices and stitching

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Originally Posted by Liquorice View Post
Heart shrink tubing.
Yup, one more option. Got a good source? I've had light duty stuff shredded in minutes on a shroud.

Others?
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Re: Protective coatings for splices and stitching

I have never seen heat shrink last for more than a couple of days. It just isn't really sutable, and the heat can damage many lines.

Maxi jacket I have heard reasonable things about, but I have also heard of it leaving marks on deck.


Frankly I don't see the point of coverings, except for seizing when you need to protect the small line from UV or chaff, in which case I would prefer to just splice it if possible, or cover it with fabric stitched in place.
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Old 12-30-2013
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Re: Protective coatings for splices and stitching

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I have never seen heat shrink last for more than a couple of days. It just isn't really sutable, and the heat can damage many lines.

Maxi jacket I have heard reasonable things about, but I have also heard of it leaving marks on deck.


Frankly I don't see the point of coverings, except for seizing when you need to protect the small line from UV or chaff, in which case I would prefer to just splice it if possible, or cover it with fabric stitched in place.
Yup, that's been my expereince with heat shrink. No, the temperatures are not too high if care is used, at least not for polyester (HM is different).

Maxijacket has been suggested by some very well known riggers (no name dropping), specifically to protect lock stitching (most splices need some) and exposed core-dependent splices on halyards.

While a sewn covering is often best--tubular webbing can work too--that isn't an option if the splice taper must go over a block.
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Re: Protective coatings for splices and stitching

Quote:
Originally Posted by pdqaltair View Post
Yup, that's been my expereince with heat shrink. No, the temperatures are not too high if care is used, at least not for polyester (HM is different).

Maxijacket has been suggested by some very well known riggers (no name dropping), specifically to protect lock stitching (most splices need some) and exposed core-dependent splices on halyards.

While a sewn covering is often best--tubular webbing can work too--that isn't an option if the splice taper must go over a block.
While somewhat time consuming, whipping a splice throat with waxed twine is a good alternative that will last a long time.
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Re: Protective coatings for splices and stitching

What's wrong with dyneema chafe guard?

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Re: Protective coatings for splices and stitching

Dyneema covers? Certainly a very valid option, perhaps the best option in many cases. I've done this before.

* Overkill for many. Those pictures are halyard porn and my boat would faint.
* Doesn't apply to webbing, such as jacklines, tethers and exposed clew stitching.
* What is protecting all of the stitching? Normally waxed whipping twine will last as long as the line in such an application.
* Often too large to fit into blocks, unless the blocks have been over sized (which is certainly possible if the line has been downsized).
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Last edited by pdqaltair; 12-30-2013 at 04:20 PM.
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Re: Protective coatings for splices and stitching

Those halyards were for a J120 going to bermuda this year. The DCS is great to work with and can be used for many different things.

As an alternative, you could use dyneema thread for your whipping or lock stitching. But in most cases, dacron thread lasts pretty well in sunlight. Sailrite has large quantities.
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Re: Protective coatings for splices and stitching

Btw dyneema 50lbs test fishing line can be picked up for almost nothing and is really nice to work with. I buy the end of spools from the local fishing shop in 50' lengths they can't use for about $5.

On a completely seperate note, splicing 50lbs test is proving to be very difficult... I need a magnifying glass to even see the strands.
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