SailNet Community

SailNet Community (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/)
-   Gear & Maintenance (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/)
-   -   A Few questions from a beginer (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/18029-few-questions-beginer.html)

clay3482 07-08-2006 08:59 PM

A Few questions from a beginer
 
Thanks for taking the time to read this.

A good friend and I have recently had the oppertunity to start sailing. We have a boat that is about 15 foot long with a centerboard, one main sail and one jib.

We have figured out that there is a lot that we do not know. SO here are some questions.

1 - We have a Minn Kota Trolling motor with 26 pound thrust. We cant get it to mount on the back of the boat and it seems like it would provide a lot of drag if we could. How can you mount a small motor and have it out of the way? Could you somehow mount it on either the port or starboard bow? Are you better off buying a set of ors? If so how in the heck can you keep the boat facing into the wind while you raise your sails without a motor? Suggestions and mounting bracket direction would be appreciated.

2 - We need to paint the inside and outside of the fiberglass boat - at least we think - is that something that you do to a 30 year old fiberglass boat that has no paint on the inside of the boat?

3 - where can you get direction on how to use all of these trapeez things and all of these other sails. I mean what the heck is a genoa, jib jab, whatchmacall-IT???? when do you use it.

4 - Is it good to get the sailboat on one side or keep it flat?

As you can see we have a million questions and need some guidance. We are Engineers and thus can figure out some things and have the time to do it especially during the week and we want to learn.

Is there a set of books that are for people like us?

Thanks for your help - it is greatly appreciated.

Thanks
clay and tucker

sailingdog 07-09-2006 01:13 AM

An outboard motor bracket, that raises and lowers the motor would probably work quite well. Why do you want an electric trolling motor. A small four-stroke would probably be better in the long run, and weigh less.

I'd use a good two-part epoxy paint to paint the hull. It will help act as a moisture barrier as well as give you a nice finish.

You don't mention what kind of sailboat it is... the other questions could probably be better answered if we had more information.

camaraderie 07-09-2006 11:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by clay3482
1 - We have a Minn Kota Trolling motor with 26 pound thrust. We cant get it to mount on the back of the boat and it seems like it would provide a lot of drag if we could. How can you mount a small motor and have it out of the way? Could you somehow mount it on either the port or starboard bow? Are you better off buying a set of ors? If so how in the heck can you keep the boat facing into the wind while you raise your sails without a motor? Suggestions and mounting bracket direction would be appreciated.
It is hard to recommend anything here as you don't ell us WHY it will not fit on your stern. An outboard bracket on the stern of a 15 foot boat makes little sense but you might have to mount a thick wood pad onto your stern if the screws on the motor won't tighten down enough to hold the motor on your stern. Use Teak or seal a piece of marine playwood with epoxy (including the bolt holes) if you choose to do this. Don't worry about drag for a motor as small as this. You can also just buy a couple of Canoe paddles for a boat this size instead! (you'd better have them anyway for when the engine fails and there's no wind!)

2 - We need to paint the inside and outside of the fiberglass boat - at least we think - is that something that you do to a 30 year old fiberglass boat that has no paint on the inside of the boat?
Ditto the 2 part epoxy recommendation if you can afford $100 bucks for a quart. Cheaper and not as good but serviceable is regular PolyUrethane marine paint which goes for about $30 bucks a quart.

As you can see we have a million questions and need some guidance. We are Engineers and thus can figure out some things and have the time to do it especially during the week and we want to learn.

Is there a set of books that are for people like us?

There are a million books for people like you but I think the places to start are the "Sailing for Dummies" book which covers all the basics and Gary Jobsen's "Sailing Fundamentals" which is more comprehensive and has great illustrations.
You are about to have a ton of fun! Enjoy!!

Fstbttms 07-09-2006 12:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by clay3482
As you can see we have a million questions and need some guidance. We are Engineers and thus can figure out some things and have the time to do it especially during the week and we want to learn.

Two words: Sailing school. You will learn more in a week than you would in a year of trying to teach yourself. Can't say that you will learn how to paint a boat, but you'll learn all the basic sailing skills and terminology. Then the time you spend sailing or working on the boat will be more productive and fun.

sailingdog 07-09-2006 02:12 PM

The book I recommend for newbies, and use it as required reading for new crew on my boat, is David Seidman's "The Complete Sailor"

It's relatively cheap, about $14 or so. I'd also second the suggestion for taking at least a basic learn to sail course. You'll get a lot out of a good one, as they'll go into a lot of the theory behind how a sailboat works. It will also provide you a solid foundation and give you a better sense of what questions you want to ask, and how to ask them, without sounding like a complete idiot.

CharlieCobra 07-10-2006 01:43 PM

That's the book I started with and I highly recommend it. Mine's a bit dogeared and tired from getting wet on the boat a time or two but I still look at it.

padean 04-27-2007 08:31 PM

Having only recently gotten back into sailing again, I can second the above suggestions for books, particularly "The Complete Sailor." I also found out rapidly that there were numerous 'essentials' that I just couldn't appreciate from books, and a couple of short evening courses from the local sailing club was invaluable, even if you don't have time for a weekend course. One of the greatest aspects of sailing is that I have haven't met a sailor that won't gladly take the time to answer a couple of simple questions, and help out where he/she can, and the practical advice from the local sailing classes can save you many hours of research the misdirection. Good luck, and stick to it!

camaraderie 04-27-2007 08:37 PM

Padean...good to have you aboard...tip...this thread is nearly a year old...check dates...that was the OP's ONLY post!


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:44 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012