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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #11  
Old 07-26-2006
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Hawkeye25 is on a distinguished road
Well, the best reasons to use teak on a bowsprit is because, a.) that's what we were replacing, b.) the entire structure of the bowsprit, i.e. the twin walkways, the windlass blocking, and the deck supports, are all teak, and c.) BECAUSE IT HAD WORKED FINE FOR 30 YEARS, NEVER HAD A STRENGTH PROBLEM, BUT HAD ROTTED, the one thing you said it wouldn't do.

Stay away from jatoba, also referred to as 'Brazilian Rose Wood' by those of us who've used it extensively on interior remodeling. It is extremely fond of splitting and chipping and no-one I know has yet been willing to risk it in the elements. It's hard enough to get varnish to stick to Ipe. Very hard, dense woods resist penetration by epoxies and finishes, resulting in early failure when exposed to ultraviolet. If you intend to paint with some of the newer two-part systems, however, you can expect good results from those primers and finishes. Varnish may yellow and peel within three months, or less.
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Old 07-26-2006
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I never said it wouldn't rot, I said it wouldn't rot easily :-). If you're replacing teak with teak fine but realize that when the boat was built teak was widely available and was relatively inexpensive. That is not the case today. Teak is very strong but still too expensive for my taste for the application.
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Old 07-26-2006
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All fine and good, BUT where do you get teak for $16. a board foot? Everyone local (grand rapids mi.) want right around $30 for teak. one of the reasons I decided it was better to spend a few days sanding my coamings than to make new as per original plans

Ken.
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Old 07-26-2006
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Edensaw in the Seattle area has teak for a little under $16 for 4/4 and a little over for 8/4.
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Old 07-27-2006
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windship has a little shameless behaviour in the past
How come nobody recomended Sitka spruce?? One person suggested Fir. There are better woods than teak for this application. Teak has poor compressive strength.
A bobstay will stop the tendancy to pull the appendage from the deck if there is going to be a headstay attached to it.

Dennis
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Old 07-27-2006
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sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
A bobstay is an excellent idea, to counter the upward force on a sprit. However, many boats do not have a good anchoring point for a bobstay.
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