Foul Weather Gear--can I use [gasp] Civilian / Lands End stuff? - Page 2 - SailNet Community

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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #11  
Old 08-02-2006
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Don't spend a lot of money on gear unless you know what you are doing. Don't buy bibs unless you are going offshore for several days. Buy some cheap nylon jackets from the marine stores during the fall closeout. You will want both foul weather coats and jackets (shorter in length) for dingy riding or going ashore. You will eventually want some breathable gear if you perspire, makes a huge difference in comfort. Offshore gear is wonderful for offshore use but too bulky for day sailing. Breathable coastal gear is perfect for the bay, watch the sales. Don't forget to get fleece jackets for use under the weather gear. Having cheap gear aboard is great for when you bring along guests, they are never prepared for SF bay sailing. It always cracks me up when I see a boat going out with a bikini clad babe on deck.
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  #12  
Old 08-02-2006
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A good source for decent fleece shirts is Old Navy. They have fairly heavy long sleeved fleece shirts for about $10.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
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  #13  
Old 08-05-2006
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Helley Hansen has a water-flow problem with their weather gear.

With the kit I had, the water hits it, goes straight through but won't leak out again. You have to take the gear off to let the water out.

I wouldn't have their gear again if they gave it to me for free.
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  #14  
Old 08-05-2006
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My Musto MPX jacket is basically like being in a house...and looking out an open window... I stay nice and warm and dry, but I can see that it is raining, and occasionally the rain hits me in the face.

The dual cuffs on the sleeves allow me to even reach up and work on things above my head, and not have rain come sluicing down the sleeves—which is important, as I am fairly short.

The high storm collar, which is fleece-lined, is really nice, especially if you've velcroed the thing tight, and between it and my Tilley hat, nothing comes down my neck.

The one problem I've found with sailing foul weather gear is that any of it that fits my shoulders, is designed for someone a foot or more taller than me. Being less than 5' 6" and having a 44" chest and 18" neck requires that I get XL-size gear generally. I usually have enough extra material in the arms to make a small duffel bag.

I generally have my foulies altered by a place in Madison, CT.
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New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #15  
Old 08-05-2006
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Sometimes you can find good foulies in regular camping supply stores - the cost is usually less because yachties are perceived as "rich," while campers are not.

If it's for yachts and it has a name embossed on the chest, you can guarantee that it will be designated for the "fashion-conscious yachtsman" - and that is Gucci territory for marketing folks. You'll get the yacht markup (at least 40%) plus the designer apparrel markup (another 40%).

A few years ago, I bought a locally made heavy rain jacket at a camp store here in Thailand for about US$30. In design and construction, it appeared very much like the high-end FW gear I'd seen in magazines priced at 4-5x as much. To test it, I put on a T-shirt, zipped, pulled and tabbed everything up, hopped in the shower with the hand-held nozzle and tried my best to force water ingress. Not a drop.

That jacket subsequently kept me dry sailing through a typhoon in the South China Sea!

Just goes to show you.

Last edited by sneuman; 08-05-2006 at 09:23 AM.
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  #16  
Old 08-05-2006
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Similar Problem in fit

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
My Musto MPX jacket is basically like being in a house...and looking out an open window... I stay nice and warm and dry, but I can see that it is raining, and occasionally the rain hits me in the face.

The dual cuffs on the sleeves allow me to even reach up and work on things above my head, and not have rain come sluicing down the sleeves—which is important, as I am fairly short.

The high storm collar, which is fleece-lined, is really nice, especially if you've velcroed the thing tight, and between it and my Tilley hat, nothing comes down my neck.

The one problem I've found with sailing foul weather gear is that any of it that fits my shoulders, is designed for someone a foot or more taller than me. Being less than 5' 6" and having a 44" chest and 18" neck requires that I get XL-size gear generally. I usually have enough extra material in the arms to make a small duffel bag.

I generally have my foulies altered by a place in Madison, CT.
I have the other problem being female and tall with a long torso. When the jacket fits my shoulders/chest the sleeves, are too short. When the waist fits the legs are too short or too long. I have switched to male sizes and found that their construction, even in the same brand, to be more sturdy.
I guess the mfg'rs think us gals don't do as much out there on our boats.

As far as reflective patches, they are a great idea and should be on all working foul weather gear. I remember pulling into the marina parking lot during a squall at night and everyone who was wearing reflective patches was clearly visible, it was quite a sight. Who knows how many accidents have been prevented by them.
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  #17  
Old 08-05-2006
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Muckabout-

If you want the name of the place I use to do foul weather gear alterations, send me a PM. The retroreflective patches are really quite amazing, especially in an unlit parking lot at night...
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #18  
Old 08-05-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sneuman
Sometimes you can find good foulies in regular camping supply stores - the cost is usually less because yachties are perceived as "rich," while campers are not.

If it's for yachts and it has a name embossed on the chest, you can guarantee that it will be designated for the "fashion-conscious yachtsman" - and that is Gucci territory for marketing folks. You'll get the yacht markup (at least 40%) plus the designer apparrel markup (another 40%).

A few years ago, I bought a locally made heavy rain jacket at a camp store here in Thailand for about US$30. In design and construction, it appeared very much like the high-end FW gear I'd seen in magazines priced at 4-5x as much. To test it, I put on a T-shirt, zipped, pulled and tabbed everything up, hopped in the shower with the hand-held nozzle and tried my best to force water ingress. Not a drop.

That jacket subsequently kept me dry sailing through a typhoon in the South China Sea!

Just goes to show you.
Even the heaviest non-marine foul weather gear is generally lacking features that make the marine gear so much more livable.

1) Most heavy foul weather gear has ventilation problems, well-designed, marine-specific foul weather gear generally does not, as it is designed for use in a very wet environment.

2) For really bad weather, being out on a sailiboat, features like double sleeve cuffs, high storm collars, face protection, fleece-lined hand warmer pockets, waterproof pockets, PFD/harness integration, and retroreflective safety reflector patches are a necessity.

3) Truly waterproof zipper openings, with interior and exterior storm flaps.

4) Large zippers with large teeth that do not jam easily, which can be opened and closed with gloves on, and have double slides, so they can be opened up from the bottom or down from the top.

5) An adjustable hood, so that it isn't falling down over your eyes, yet is covering as much of your head as possible. The hoods on most non-marine foulweather gear don't have any way to adjust the length of the hood, or the scope of its coverage. With the hood on my Musto adjusted, I can have a slit for me to look out, with the storm collar and hood protecting all of my face except the slit for my eyes. Add glasses or goggles to that, and I'm pretty much completely protected.

6) Colors—much of the terrestrial foul weather gear comes in the colors blue, green, and black. These colors are horrible choices for marine use, as they are very difficult to see against the ocean, should you fall overboard. My Musto gear is a bright yellow. My Henri Lloyd drysuit is bright red.

The gear that most reminds me of marine foul weather gear, in terms of durability and features, is high-end alpine ski gear. My Columbia ski jacket has a lot of the same features as my Musto jacket, and both were designed for use in extremely harsh environments. BTW, my Columbia Whirlibird is at least 10 years old...and still going strong.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
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  #19  
Old 08-06-2006
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[quote=sailingdog]Even the heaviest non-marine foul weather gear is generally lacking features that make the marine gear so much more livable.

1) Most heavy foul weather gear has ventilation problems, well-designed, marine-specific foul weather gear generally does not, as it is designed for use in a very wet environment.

My jacket isn't the most breathable, but neither is much of the high-end foul weather gear I've tried. Breathability, especially here in the tropics is relative

2) For really bad weather, being out on a sailiboat, features like double sleeve cuffs, high storm collars, face protection, fleece-lined hand warmer pockets, waterproof pockets, PFD/harness integration, and retroreflective safety reflector patches are a necessity.


3) Truly waterproof zipper openings, with interior and exterior storm flaps.

4) Large zippers with large teeth that do not jam easily, which can be opened and closed with gloves on, and have double slides, so they can be opened up from the bottom or down from the top.

Yep.

6) Colors—much of the terrestrial foul weather gear comes in the colors blue, green, and black. These colors are horrible choices for marine use, as they are very difficult to see against the ocean, should you fall overboard. My Musto gear is a bright yellow. My Henri Lloyd drysuit is bright red.

My jacket is indeed bright yellow, which is infinitely superior to the red or even orange, IMHO.

I still believe most stuff geared toward the pleasure marine sector is wildly overpriced - foul weather gear being just one of those items. I can't count the number of times I've bought boat bits in chandleries serving the local fishermen here in Asia only to find the exact same item or a near-exact equivalent for 3-5x as much in a "marine" store.
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  #20  
Old 08-06-2006
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Is the West Marine 3rd Reef or Key West foulies ok for weekend cruising?
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