Advice, please on crimping wire connections... - Page 5 - SailNet Community

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  #41  
Old 08-22-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruisingdad
Nick,

It is quite obvious to me that you have never chewed Duct tape. It leaves a horrible taste in your mouth. As for the 5200, I am afraid the long term (or short term) conscequences of never being able to chew again make it a poor choice for the cruising couple.

Nope. Bubble gum is the way to go. "A little chew, put it on, sitck it, then your're through."
I know it taste horrible, but I dont want to attract bugs do to the gum, I live in Florida. Do you use regular or sugar free? And have you had any bug problems?
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  #42  
Old 08-22-2006
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Me Thinks This:
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  #43  
Old 08-22-2006
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Easy Jr. Did you slip and fall on an ear or two of corn?
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  #44  
Old 08-23-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
Nah, we just think you're an illiterate, ignorant and obnoxious A$$.
Huh? but I've already told you I'm not American

Some may find this A Usefull Tip.

Many prototype electronic circuits where "potted" traditionally to prevent repairs or reconstruction by the end user. the technique involved nothing more than a small container, a bedding layer of epoxy,then insert circuit and cover with more epoxy until level.

things like smashed or broken junction boxes can easily be re/constructed mid voyage using any small container and epoxy.

The most successfull use of the method I know of was a seagoing fishing boat where the bilge pump wiring got severed close to the pump and the repair was made at sea by stripping and twisting the tails before drying and "potting" them in Araldite filled screw top bottle caps. The repair was still 100% effective 6 years later when the bilge pump was being replaced during a refit.

I don't recomend leaving an on the fly repair do for 6 years, but none the less the method and simplicity of quickly fabricating lasting waterproof repair suitable for many tricky situations at sea using such common onboard items is one worth mentioning.

The method can also be used for casing repairs for dropped/ cracked handheld radios or gps etc if they are cracked but still functioning (since the epoxy is also an effective electrical insulator.)
Simply fill all cracked and exposed areas then tape up or wrap in plastic for shaping untill the epoxy sets.

The result may be ugly and irreversable but at least any remaining functionality can be effectively preserved untill the end of that leg of a voyage

Last edited by jorjo; 08-23-2006 at 01:21 AM.
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  #45  
Old 08-23-2006
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To crimp or not to crimp....

Shrink tube can be slid over the wire and warmed up with a heat gun, or better yet, shrink connectors can be purchased to give the same results -> a water tight seal.

Good luck!
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  #46  
Old 08-23-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by happyman
Shrink tube can be slid over the wire and warmed up with a heat gun, or better yet, shrink connectors can be purchased to give the same results -> a water tight seal.

Good luck!
Only adhesive-lined heat shrink tubing really gives a water tight seal. Normal heat shrink tubing gives a seal, but is not water-tight as capiliary action will wick water up in to the tubing.

And Jorjo... that just mean's you're an Irish illiterate @$$.
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  #47  
Old 08-25-2006
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Hey, far be it from me to duck the chewing sidebar, but anyone have favorite sources for racheting crimpers? btw, that link--I think it was sailingdogs's--to the GoodOldBoat crimp / electrical test made a convert out of me.

Also need wire and liquid tape. Generally speaking, tinned #14 wire is what to use, correct? Cabin lights, that sort of thing?
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  #48  
Old 08-25-2006
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What wire you should be using depends on the load and the distance run. "Ampacity" tables, as Calder calls them, are pretty widely available and will tell you what kind of load will work over what distance. Don't forget that the wiring should be designed for the HEAVIEST LOAD on a circuit, while the breakers should be sized for the LOWEST LOAD on a circuit. The reason for this should be pretty obvious. You want the breakers to trip well before the wire heats up significantly.

If you have several loads on a circuit, and one is significantly lower than the others, say an LED light versus regular incandescents, it should probably have an in-line fuse near the fixture, because if you gear the breaker for the LED light fixture, you'll probably trip it every time you turn on an incandescent fixture. Likewise, if you have three incandescent light fixtures on a single circuit, the breaker should be geared to trip if one of them shorts, not if all three short, otherwise you could be risking a serious fire from one shorting out and the breaker not tripping. Calder has a pretty good discussion of this in his book.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #49  
Old 08-25-2006
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Typically you'd choose wire that is adequately sized to have less than a 3% voltage drop in the run you are using. Let's say a cabin light in the v-berth, 30' away from the breaker panel including all the zigzags in the line. That makes it a 60' run, because you count both sides of the circuit. With a 20-watt bulb in that light...you'd draw less than two amps, so you could use a thin wire pair that only has a 3% voltage drop at 2 amps, and it would be good enough to give you a nice bright light. (In practice, you'd probably use a heavier wire and "t" off multiple lights all the way along one side of the boat, doing some rough figuring for the total of them all and something less than the total length for something that complex. In practice, you might just pick up the closest spool of wire you had, since 100' spools are cheaper and you just might have 14g at hand.)

The actual power handling capacity of the wire, called ampacity, will be well above the "3% voltage drop" size. Ampacity depends on what the insulation type is, and whether the wire will be in "free air" or buried in a bundle or conduit, which traps heat. If you exceed the ampacity rating--the wire catches fire, which is not a good thing. If you pick wire which has more than a 3% voltage drop, you just choke the devices at the far end.

For instance, if you use 10g wire to feed your masthead light, the light will be nice and bright. But if you use 14g or 16g wire, you can save some weight aloft. To a diehard racer...the 14g wire and saving weight aloft might be the right answer. If you don't want to get run down at night...10g might be better.

Sources for crimping tools? I'd avoid no-name junk from China because it is easy to make the dies the wrong size. Any brand name from any reputable source should do. Palladin is one of the "second-tier" brands you'll find at a lot of computer stores, etc., that seems to be quite good for casual use. (Might not hold up to 50,000 crimps in industrial use but that's not us, right?)

Something else about crimps that I don't think anyone has mentioned here. The fittings should be tubular, or lined with tubular liners (copper or tinned sleeves) and not split metal. The $5/100 kind in the auto stores are always split metal, not seamless tubing, and if you crimp the tooth down on the split side--instead of the seamless side--the crimp will never have full strength. There are real differences in "the good stuff" that way.

You'll see most ratcheting crimpers have a removable/replaceable crimp die. If you find one that doesn't, don't worry about that. In practice you don't swap dies, you swap tools. You remove the die to replace it after it has worn out, which shouldn't be an issue for "home" users. Looking at how clean the tooling is, the overall quality of it, is more important. If you need to crimp TV cables or something else, buy a second crimper not a second die.
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  #50  
Old 08-25-2006
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AMP, Ancor, Paladin, and Ideal are four companies that make ratcheting crimp tools.

Hellosailor's point about the crimp fittings is very valid, also the ones you find in the automotive store are often steel rather than tinned copper, which is what I beleive the marine-grade crimp fittings are made of. The automotive ones will not only not hold as well, but will generally corrode in a marine environment.
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New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
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