how many anchors do you need? - SailNet Community
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 10 Old 08-27-2006 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 398
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 10
 
how many anchors do you need?

I just bought a 27 foot sailboat and I went through the various lockers and lazarettes and found 4 anchors and one sea-anchor.

The anchors seem to be doubles ( two of the same).
They are all danfourth anchors. On the two smaller ones the blade is just shy of two hand lengths (probably about 15 inches). The two big ones have blades that are about 21 inches long.

Do I need that many anchors? How many anchor lines should you carry?

Also, one of the big ones is the aluminum type. A Fortress brand. It is nice and light but is it as good as the heavy ones?

Thanks,
groundhog
groundhog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 10 Old 08-27-2006
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
Generally, the heavier the anchor, the better...

It is generally unwise to have four anchors of the same design on a boat, as different anchors have different strengths and weaknesses. For instance, having four fluke-type anchors means that you've got four relatively, lightweight anchors that don't handle shifting winds or currents well. Danforths tend to have great holding power, provided that the boat doesn't shift in relation to the anchor. They also hold best in sand and mud bottoms, and have some issues in kelp, grass and rocky bottoms.

I generally recommend that you carry a minimum of two anchors, and that one be a lighter anchor that can be handled in a dinghy and used for kedging off the boat, and things like that. On my boat, that anchor is a 13 lb. Danforth, with 10' 1/4" chain and 100' 1/2" nylon.

Your primary anchor should be larger, heavier and stronger. My primary anchor is a 33. lb. Rocna, on 30' G4 chain and 280' 5/8" nylon rode. This anchor is a bit oversized for my boat, but once it sets, I really don't worry very much about it.

Some people think that anchoring using two anchors is more secure than using a single larger anchor. I think that is a bad way of thinking. Two anchors are harder to set, harder to retrieve, increase the chance of fouling, and it is difficult to truly set both anchors properly. On a bad bottom—kelp or grass—a heavier anchor is much more likely to set properly, and having two lighter ones is going to be a much worse choice, as neither will probably set properly.

Sea anchors can be a problem unless you have specially designed points for attaching the sea anchor. Most large parachute type sea-anchors are capable of stopping the boat almost completely in the middle of the ocean. However, the shock loads on the attachment points are very, very high, and if not properly engineered, can tear the points from the boat.

BTW, I prefer a Jordan Series Drogue, as it generates far lower loads, and has been proven to be a very safe way to survive heavy weather. I think it is a better choice, as it was designed specifically to help prevent rogue waves and breaking waves from damaging the boat.

I hope this helps.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #3 of 10 Old 08-28-2006
Senior Member
 
sailandoar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Cape Fear, NC, USA
Posts: 208
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
Fortress

In general I agree with sailingdog.

Regarding Fortress anchors. They can be a wonderful thing. Danforths depend more on fluke area than on sheer weight. That does not mean that weight does not help. However, in clean sand or especially a soft (mud/muck) bottom the danforth type in a large size is best for a straight one direction pull, (assumes it will not trip out and have to reset). The Fortress allows you to have a HUGE, fluke area but in a anchor that you can manage. Ever try to manage a 60 pound danforth in a 8' or 9' dingy and Oh bye the way, where on a small boat do you store a HUGE danforth? The fortress can be taken apart and stored until "THE STORM", or you need to kedge off and the only place to set the main anchor is a mud bank.

That said I am much more comfortable on a single anchor if it is NOT a danforth type. CQR, Bruce, Rokna etc 'AS BIG AS YOU CAN MANAGE'.

My other favorite anchor thingy is a sentinal. Usually tied to anchor line so that the weight is just off the bottom at low tide. For me the sentinal collection is a couple of weights, 10-15 lb and a 20-30 lb lead weights. They have eye bolts in them and I use rolling hitch to secure to the anchor line/chain wiht small stuff (3/16 etc) and then let them out to hold the line down (increase scope). Depending on conditions I might use the smaller or the larger or both or neither one. Even more important in a crowded anchorage is to keep your anchor line down so some YAHOO in a motorboat does not run over it. Ticks me off to see folks that make the area a navagation hazard with long anchor lines leading out a a shallow angle so I can get wrapped up in them. Also it prevents the anchor line from tangling up onto fin keels and spade rudders when the tide turns and the boat spins around.
sailandoar is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #4 of 10 Old 08-28-2006
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
An anchor sentinel is also called a kellet.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #5 of 10 Old 08-28-2006
Wandering Aimlessly
 
PBzeer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Cruising
Posts: 21,008
Thanks: 0
Thanked 92 Times in 89 Posts
Rep Power: 15
     
I have a CQR primary on 30/300, a secondary Fortress on the same, and a smaller Danforth on 100' of line for a lunch hook off the stern. Seems to work well for me.

John
Ontario 32 - Aria

Free, is the heart, that lives not, in fear.
Full, is the spirit, that thinks not, of falling.
True, is the soul, that hesitates not, to give.
Alive, is the one, that believes, in love.
JCP


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
- Website & Blog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
PBzeer is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #6 of 10 Old 08-28-2006
Senior Member
 
Gene T's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Left Coast USA
Posts: 666
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
You didn't say how you intend to use the boat. But I doubt you need more than 2 anchors on your boat. In a perfect world they would be different types. 4 or more anchors are appropriate for an ocean cruiser BTW, but mostly because you might loose one.

I have been boating for 30 years and have only had Danforth HT anchors, but there are better anchors out there. It's just that I wouldn't worry about it yet. Keep the best Danforth on board and the Fortress and take the others home. Keep weight off your boat as much as possible for weekending and day sailing. 27 foot boats are easy to overload. If your boat came with Danforth anchors it is probably because they work well in your area.

When and if you head off to distant places you can outfit the boat with more stuff.

Last edited by Gene T; 08-28-2006 at 03:17 PM.
Gene T is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #7 of 10 Old 08-28-2006
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene T
I have been boating for 30 years had 3 have only had Danforth HT anchors, but there are better anchors out there. It's just that I wouldn't worry about it yet. Keep the best Danforth on board and the Fortress and take the others home. Keep weight off your boat as much as possible for weekending and day sailing. 27 foot boats are easy to overload. If your boat came with Danforth anchors it is probably because they work well in your area.
GeneT-

You're making the assumption that he bought the boat in the area he will be sailing in, which may or may not be the case. However, your suggestion that he talk to local sailors, in the area he will be sailing in, for what kind of anchors work well in the area is a good one.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #8 of 10 Old 08-28-2006
Senior Member
 
Gene T's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Left Coast USA
Posts: 666
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
GeneT-

You're making the assumption that he bought the boat in the area he will be sailing in, which may or may not be the case. However, your suggestion that he talk to local sailors, in the area he will be sailing in, for what kind of anchors work well in the area is a good one.
Agree, but that is a pretty good assumption. Sorry for the typo, I was going to say I have had 3 very different 30 ft boats and have used Danforth anchors on both coasts. Never had an anchor drag. I will occasionally lightly set a stern anchor after digging in the primary first if I expect wind or current problems. Never had to anchor in a storm. While I do believe the newer designs are better, there is a tendency to tell newbies horror stories about what they should or should not use for gear on their new boat. A 27 ft boat is also easier to anchor, simply because it is so much easier to hold.
Gene T is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #9 of 10 Old 08-28-2006
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
The only complaint I've got with my Rocna, is that it seems to bring up almost 25 lbs. of the bottom with it, every time I haul it up.

Setting the second anchor is not a bad idea, provided you've got the anchor set in the right position for the current/wind shift, especially with fluke type anchors.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #10 of 10 Old 08-29-2006
Anchorsmith
 
Craig Smith's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 253
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
Arrow

Quote:
Originally Posted by groundhog
The anchors seem to be doubles ( two of the same).
They are all danfourth anchors. On the two smaller ones the blade is just shy of two hand lengths (probably about 15 inches). The two big ones have blades that are about 21 inches long.

Do I need that many anchors? How many anchor lines should you carry?

Also, one of the big ones is the aluminum type. A Fortress brand. It is nice and light but is it as good as the heavy ones?
No you don't need that many anchors. As someone has said it's common to carry multiple hooks, but if you do so you would vary the type so as to cover all your bets. Having four Danforth-styles is silly, especially as a Danforth style, including the Fortress, is not to be used as a general purpose primary anchor. Don't think to routinely use multiple anchors at the same time, that's not sensible - it complicates things unnecessarily.

Advice: get rid of three of them, keep the fourth (e.g. the Fortress) as a spare or auxillary, and buy a decent primary hook. Maybe a third would be nice if you don't mind the extra weight.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailandoar
My other favorite anchor thingy is a sentinal. Usually tied to anchor line so that the weight is just off the bottom at low tide. For me the sentinal collection is a couple of weights, 10-15 lb and a 20-30 lb lead weights. They have eye bolts in them and I use rolling hitch to secure to the anchor line/chain wiht small stuff (3/16 etc) and then let them out to hold the line down (increase scope). Depending on conditions I might use the smaller or the larger or both or neither one. Even more important in a crowded anchorage is to keep your anchor line down so some YAHOO in a motorboat does not run over it. Ticks me off to see folks that make the area a navagation hazard with long anchor lines leading out a a shallow angle so I can get wrapped up in them. Also it prevents the anchor line from tangling up onto fin keels and spade rudders when the tide turns and the boat spins around.
All true - but don't lull yourself into a false sense of security; kellets/sentinels do very little for the ultimate holding power of the anchor. An all-chain rode may be a better solution to address the issues mentioned, depending on the area and the boat.

Craig Smith

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Sailnet Disclosure: Craig is the son of the designer of Rocna and has a financial interest in its success.
Craig Smith is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
anchors walt123 Seamanship & Navigation 57 05-01-2003 01:35 PM
Anchors for anchor rollers Dana125 Gear & Maintenance 4 05-12-2002 09:37 AM
Spade Anchors Aluminum vs Steel thomsonjd Gear & Maintenance 1 12-31-2001 12:54 PM
Anchors; CQR compared to Delta jbstack Gear & Maintenance 1 03-13-2001 07:19 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome