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  #11  
Old 08-28-2006
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Also welding the chainplate- The welded part once installed is below deck and the top sealed with a sealant to keep water from getting down into the deck. Do you still think It would cause a corrosion problem for thy are welded at the Factory? It is being welded with stainless. Just trying to figure out where I would get custom chainplates made without welding. Thanks Ken
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I don't know about all this mess but I will say one thing- you should heard that thing let go under sail. It sounded like a gun shot and did this nasty whizz as it flung the shroud cable over the mast. Made me plenty nervous! I dropped sail and motored back in!
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Old 08-28-2006
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The problem is that there are probably microscopic faults throughout most of the rigging. If you can see rust, and you wipe it off, and it isn't just a light layer of surface corrosion...you're due for a nasty surprise should you go sailing in heavy winds... You're actually pretty lucky... if you had been standing the the way of the shroud when it let go—it could have seriously hurt you or killed you. Why do you think it sounded like a gunshot...do you have any idea how much energy is stored in the standing rigging on your boat when it is under sail? Do you really feel like playing Russian Rigging Roulette with your life?

Just my $0.02 worth. BTW, did you check with the website I posted in an earilier link, or were you too lazy to bother. It is the website for Columbia Yatch owners...and the site has lots of links to other resources for Columbia Yatch owners. You should also try the Columbia forum on this site...as I also suggested earlier.
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BTW, replacing the rigging isn't all that difficult, provided you have the right measurements for the rig. You can do almost all of it yourself. The materials you need are fairly simple, and so are most of the tools. I'd recommend getting Brian Toss's The Complete Rigging Apprentice.

The materials you need are 316 Stainless 1x19 rigging wire, Stay-Loc connectors, marine bronze or 316 stainless turnbuckles, toggles, clevis pins, and cotter pins. The exact dimensions of them are specific to your boat, and you'll need to get them.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Old 08-29-2006
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Crevice Corrosion

Hi KT,

The reason your chainplate sheared may be down to a faulty weld - but given the age of the chainplate before it let go, and from my understanding that the bit that gave up was plastered against the deck, it might have failed due to crevice corrosion or chloride stress corrosion which are two really "special" failings that stainless steel suffers from in dark, damp (especially seawater-damp) spaces.

The chainplate for my starboard backstay on my 32' Cape Carib recently let go in a similar (though much less dramatic) way. I noticed it that the cotter pin was about 1/2" further above the deck than on the port side, and a firm tug revealed why.

I've since replaced both backstay chainplates (the port-side one looked okay from a visual inspection, but I didn't choose to chance it) as well as taking off the bow roller/stem/forestay fitting and checking that out, and I plan to remove the chainplates for the upper and both sets of lower shrouds in due course to inspect them.

Anyhoo - bear it in mind - check out http://www.corrosion-doctors.org/Mat...stainsteel.htm or http://www.mcnallyinstitute.com/04-html/4-1.html

Alternatively, one of these other egg-heads might be able to give you the lowdown and dirty on it.

Cheers,

BlueEagle
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Also, one other point I'd make. On some of the older boats, the rigging chainplates were 304 stainless steel, not 316 stainless steel.

304 Stainless has known issues with chloride stress corrosion, and in the case of one construction project, failure of the 304 stainless ended up killing people. Of course this was at a indoor swimming pool facility, not on a boat.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
You've broken an ear off the chainplate. You're going to have to replace the chainplates...and while you're at it, you should replace the ones on the otehr side and inspect the ones at the bow and stern for the forestay and backstay respectively. I would also recommend you check the masthead fittings for the stays and shrouds... it sounds like your boat has a bit of a corrosion problem.

BTW, welding one isn't always a good choice, as the welds tend to corrode faster than a new, machined chainplate would. The problem with the welds is that the carbon ties up the chromium in the stainless steel, and that prevents the stainless steel from passivating properly and it rusts fairly quickly.

BTW, I'd be wary of saying the cable and turnbuckle are fine until someone inspects them thouroughly.
My sweetie is a rigger and he says that in situations like this, the integrity of the entire rig is suspect. The mast/rigging is supposed to act as a system with each part dependent on its neighbors. If one part has failed it is likely that other parts will not be far behind.

Time to have someone who knows what they are doing take a look at the entire thing. A dismasting will spoil your entire day.

Hugs,

SoK

By the way, he also says that welding stainless can be a real problem unless done by a very capable person.

SoK

Last edited by SteppingonKittens; 08-29-2006 at 11:22 AM.
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ktucker,
You may be able to do alot if not all of the work yourself. However, base on what I've heard here you have a little to learn first. Please, Please, talk to a reputable rigger in your area and have an inspection performed. This may cost you a couple hundred dollars but it will be money well spent.
After that, you can begin to decide how best to approch the problem.
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Actually, replacing the chainplates, and re-doing the rigging is not all that hard. This is all pretty simple mechanically. The real trick is getting the measurements and the tension on the rig right after he's done.

I would agree that you should spend the money and have a rigging shop take a look at your boat. The mast is at risk...and so are you.
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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As far as finding a local rigger get a copy of Latitudes 38 - check West Marine they're free- not only is it a go sailing rag with lots of good articles but you will find lots of ads for boatyards riggers sailmakers and just about any thing else you might want in your area.
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