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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #11  
Old 09-05-2006
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just because I'm a little ignorant on the jargon side: a turning block would be a pulley that's anchored to the boat, either loose (with a short lead attached) or fixed. is that correct?

thanks!

jon
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  #12  
Old 09-05-2006
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Jon
You're on the right track.
If I remember correctly, the Bayfields have an aluminum perforated toerail around the deck edge (gunwales - pronounced gunnels) If you have blocks on board that have snap shackles attached (openable connectors) they were probably mounted through the holes in the toerail. The toerail design allows you to attach these blocks where ever you need them to be. As mentioned in a previous post, for your Genoa this location could well be aft of the winch.
You should probably figure out how to properly use this sail; in light conditions you'll appreciate having the extra sail area. However if it's a "170%" genoa - oversized as compared to the usual 150% -it may not be worth the hassle, assuming the 150 is what's on the furler.
you can check that by measuring the distance from the clew (where the sheets attach) through to the luff at right angles to the luff (leading) edge. Compare that measurement to your "J" (distance from the forestay to the base of the mast). If your J measurement is, say, 10 feet, then a 150% genoa would measure 15 feet as described above.

Good Luck
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  #13  
Old 09-06-2006
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Thank you Faster for your reply!

Excellent advice and I shall endeavor to make it so.

Sincerely,

/s/ Jon C. Munson II
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Old 09-06-2006
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The snatch blocks for my jib sheets attach to the toe rail. I can't quite tell from your picture but the toe rail may have slots in it. This may be where the snatch blocks go. It has the advantage of being able to place the blocks anywhere along the rail.

Those grab rails look like they may be teak. A good cleaning and oiling with teak oil should clean them up.
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  #15  
Old 09-06-2006
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Thanks Dave!

To the best of my knowledge, those rails are teak.

I had discussed with my brother using a wood oil to "fix up" the wooden parts that are salvageable (some are not and need replacing) and he's game for that. I appreciate the confirmation of my suggestion.

Also, the toe rail does indeed have holes in it, so I'm going to take everyone's advice and put turning blocks in an appropriate location.

Thanks again!

Sincerely,

/s/ Jon C. Munson II
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Old 09-06-2006
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A couple of thoughts on your questions.

The lines that are hanging are either check stays, in which case they would have had a pennant that ran aft to some tie off point near the stern rail, or they may have been part of a lazy jack system, in which case there would have been a piece of line that ran from somewhere forward of the center of the boom to somewhere around 2/3 to 3/4 of the length of the boom toward the aft end of the boom. There should be small eyelets on the boom to tie off the ends of this line. I personally have always found lazy jacks a pain in the butt and did not rig them on my boat even though she was set up for them originally.

With regards to your second question, it would appear (if I am seeing your photo correctly) that you have a tee track on the top of your toe rail back aft by the cockpit. Once upon a time there was probably a jib sheet lead block that rode on that track. The genoa sheet would have been run outboard of the shrouds back to that block and then up to the winch. Look around they may have been stowed below or the working jib lead block may have to be moved to that position.

There is a soap called 'Simple Green' that is supposed to be safe for the environment. It is very concentrated so you need to use very little. It does need to be washed off though.

Your trim looks like teak. You have two or three choices. You can simply wash it with a teak cleaner which will improve its looks but which won't help with longevity. You can use a teak cleaner and then lightly sand with fine sandpaper on a sanding block to bring down raised grain and then coat with a couple coats of teak oil, which should last several months before needing recoating. You can carefully sand the teak until the surface is flat and level and apply either a conventional varnish (looks better and lasts longer but more work) or one of the newer coatings that do not require sanding between coats.

Good luck,
Jeff
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Old 09-06-2006
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Thank you Jeff!

Those are all excellent suggestions, I appreciate it.

I did look at Simple Green, but it didn't explicity state whether 'tis safe or not. I will, however, look at it again and read the label more closely. I've used it for various car cleaning tasks in the past.

I also appreciate the wood refinishing suggestions. My current plan is to clean with the cleaner (per your suggestion) then oil it given it's age. As theses parts weren't correctly maintained they are starting to show it and I feel it would be a waste of time on some of them to go through the expense of proper refinishing when they need replacing anyway. Oil, at least, will improve the looks and help them last a little longer.

Thanks!

Jon
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There's a Bayfield 25 at our marina. It doesn't go out often. I am headed there this afternoon and will take a digital camera so that you can see how the genny sheets are led
Marty B
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  #19  
Old 09-06-2006
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Thanks Marty, I appreciate it!
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Old 09-06-2006
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Marty-

You're assuming that it has genny sheets on it. If it really doesn't sail that much, it might not. But worth a shot in any case.
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