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post #1 of 17 Old 12-02-2015 Thread Starter
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Rigging Inspections

How satisfied have you been with any rigging inspections you have paid for?

Have you had particularly good or bad experience?

What do you look for in the report.

If you have a sample report you wouldn't mind sharing with me I would live to see it.

It seems to me that most rigging inspections are just a quick look.

Do most people use dye and a a loupe to very carefully inspect everything.

Some things like the furlerer can't be inspected unless disassembled.

Chain plates of course are probably never pulled on a standard inspection.

What have you seen, what have you liked or didn't like.

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post #2 of 17 Old 12-02-2015
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Our spar maker came to the boat when the rig was down and removed all the standing rigging. They took the rigging to their shop for inspection. They polished the ends and used a die penetrant to check for cracks, they also checked the screws. Any thing that needed to be replaced was. Chainplates are aluminum.

It's best to have the rig down for a complete and thorough inspection.
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post #3 of 17 Old 12-02-2015 Thread Starter
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Re: Rigging Inspections

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Originally Posted by Shockwave View Post
Our spar maker came to the boat when the rig was down and removed all the standing rigging. They took the rigging to their shop for inspection. They polished the ends and used a die penetrant to check for cracks, they also checked the screws. Any thing that needed to be replaced was. Chainplates are aluminum.

It's best to have the rig down for a complete and thorough inspection.
That is more through than I have heard about. Are you a racer?

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It is a lesson about the limitations of wax as an adhesive.
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post #4 of 17 Old 12-02-2015
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Re: Rigging Inspections

Aluminum chainplates?


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Re: Rigging Inspections

A skipper I sailed transatlantic with had his rigging dye-inspected prior to our departure. We sailed from Connecticut to Ireland & Scotland. Then back down to the Scillies and France. We were beating into Arcachon, France, when all of a sudden a leeward lower shroud dropped to the deck - broken off just below the fitting that attached it to the mast. Inspections can never provide 100% certainty. Additional wear & tear happens. You never know, but a good sailor tries as best he can.
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post #6 of 17 Old 12-02-2015
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Re: Rigging Inspections

When I purchased my Catalina 27, the rigging was inspected and the surveyor looked at the connections with a loop and dye. At the time, he told me that it was pretty much impossible to determine what is going on inside the crimps, and he could only visually inspect the very top of the connection, which is where it most often fails. Even with that, my forestay broke one afternoon, dropping my furled jib and roller furling system into Chesapeake Bay. Fortunately, I was able to retrieve everything, then used the old jib halyard in place of the forestay to secure the mast and limped back to the dock. The guy at the boat yard said the rest of the rigging looked OK, but because it was 30 years old, failure was a distinct probability sometime in the not too distant future. I sold the boat a few months later, and informed the purchaser that the rigging was old, but the forestay had been replaced. He's still running on the old rigging and that was five years ago - Go figure!

All the best,

Gary
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post #7 of 17 Old 12-03-2015
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Re: Rigging Inspections

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Originally Posted by travlineasy View Post
When I purchased my Catalina 27, the rigging was inspected and the surveyor looked at the connections with a loop and dye. At the time, he told me that it was pretty much impossible to determine what is going on inside the crimps, and he could only visually inspect the very top of the connection, which is where it most often fails. Even with that, my forestay broke one afternoon, dropping my furled jib and roller furling system into Chesapeake Bay. Fortunately, I was able to retrieve everything, then used the old jib halyard in place of the forestay to secure the mast and limped back to the dock. The guy at the boat yard said the rest of the rigging looked OK, but because it was 30 years old, failure was a distinct probability sometime in the not too distant future. I sold the boat a few months later, and informed the purchaser that the rigging was old, but the forestay had been replaced. He's still running on the old rigging and that was five years ago - Go figure!

All the best,

Gary
FWIW the forestay, especially when carrying a roller furler gets fatigue more than any other wire. Especially if it is not properly toggled. And then there is the problem that one cannot inspect the wire and fitting properly as the furler gear covers most of the wire and parts of the lower fitting.

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Re: Rigging Inspections

I am in the process of replacing all my rigging, including chain plates.

From my research, what I have found is most recommendations from spar suppliers is to replace all the rigging (except for chainplates if they are in good conditions) every 8-10 years. Visual inspection will catch most major problems within that 8-10 year cycle.

Interesting Article:

Another dismasting prompts new alert | Soundings Online

Every skipper ought to put together a rig inspection schedule and follow it, but what a particular sailboat’s schedule should be “depends on how you use it,” Cruder says. Sailing daily with passengers strains the rig more than occasional light use. Likewise, year-round sailing in Hawaii, California or Florida is much harder on a rig than sailing three months of the year in the Northeast. Sailing in places where the air is warm, salty and humid causes more corrosion of wires, stainless-steel terminals and chain plates than operating in cooler, freshwater regions.
“In the North, you have a short season. You haul the boat and take the rig off every year,” he says. The entire rig can be inspected annually. In places like Hawaii or Florida, a mast may not be unstepped for years, making it more difficult to thoroughly inspect the rig, especially the step.
“Here [in California] everybody leaves their rigs up until they fall down,” says Mackinnon. California has 115 inspected sailing vessels; Hawaii has 59. Virtually all of Hawaii’s are sailing catamarans.
After the 2006 and ’07 fatalities, the Coast Guard in Honolulu undertook a two-month “surge operation” to inspect the mast, rigging, sail area and overall condition of Hawaii’s inspected catamaran fleet. Seventy percent passed muster. Of those that didn’t, 11 had serious deficiencies that took them out of service until the deficiencies were corrected. The problems included excessive corrosion, fractures and missing bolts in the masts, spreaders and mast arms. Three vessels had too much sail area — in one case more than 200 square feet too much.
The Coast Guard in Hawaii has adopted a special inspection protocol for its inspected sailboats that includes requirements for a rig maintenance and inspection schedule, unstepping the mast every six years, and special attention to parts of the rigging more than 10 years old. Recommendations include replacing wires every six years, terminals every 12 years and chain plates every 18 years.
In California, the agency is adopting a similar inspection regimen that includes a Coast Guard-approved inspection plan for inspected sailboats and an annual rig inspection aloft by a knowledgeable crew; an inspection aloft by a rigger, surveyor or other third party every five years; and a thorough inspection of the entire rig that includes unstepping the mast every 10 years.
MacKinnon is happy to see it. “Nobody has been looking at the rigging unless they get an insurance survey,” he says. “Nobody has been going aloft.”

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Re: Rigging Inspections

Casey, I'm fully aware that the forestay endures considerably more pressure than the backstay, or any of the other rigging cables, however, this would be true whether the sail was a hank on or roller furling rigged. And, in my case, the forestay was much heavier than the rest of the rigging, I guess as a safety precaution. Unfortunately, it failed when I least expected, but I was lucky enough to salvage everything.

All the best,

Gary
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Re: Rigging Inspections

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Originally Posted by travlineasy View Post
Casey, I'm fully aware that the forestay endures considerably more pressure than the backstay, or any of the other rigging cables, however, this would be true whether the sail was a hank on or roller furling rigged. And, in my case, the forestay was much heavier than the rest of the rigging, I guess as a safety precaution. Unfortunately, it failed when I least expected, but I was lucky enough to salvage everything.

All the best,

Gary
Actually the roller furler induces much more load on the forestay due to the weight of the foil and drum when compared to hank sails. the foil also leads to a higher fatigue load at the mast head connection and thus a toggle in two directions is needed. Even with no sail mounted on the foil, the weight of the foil and induced wind loads can lead to fatigue failure. I actually considered doing away with the roller furler due to the mention reasons of higher loads, induced fatigue on the forestay, and difficulty inspecting, but in the end, at least for me, the benefits outweigh these disadvantages.

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