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  #11  
Old 10-16-2006
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Dow Corning 795 or GE SSG4000 (both professional glaziers sealants) are the recommended sealants. Excellent article in DIY last year on this subject. Whatever you do, don't use a polysulfide sealant on the window if it is acyrilic. The solvent crazes the acyrilic.
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  #12  
Old 10-17-2006
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The combination of Sikaflex 291 primer and 295 sealant is the best I know of on the market for rebedding portlights. The combo is slightly expensive but well worth it if it spares all the headaches of a project that leaks.
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Old 10-18-2006
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I can't count the number of times that I have pulled apart leaky things and found beads of silicone stuck to only one side. When you consider that in a bathtub tile job it only lasts about 2 years before it begins to degrade and leak I can't imagine why anyone would use it on a boat in a place meant to keep out water.
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Old 10-18-2006
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Here is yet another product to consider:

3M 4000 UV Polyether Adhesive Sealant if your windows are plastic. (I used 5200, a polyurethane to rebed my portholes because they are Brass). You should not use a polyurethane to bond plastic because it will destroy acrylic.

This is an excellent product for rebedding windows and will give you a long lasting seal.

I would also weigh in and agree that Silicone is a temporary fix. Let me give you an example. I recently had a "waterproofing expert" from Florida examine our waterproofing applications on a building I am completing in Maryland. He suggested that 20 year Silicone will last a maximum of of 10 years when properly applied. (Significantly less with direct exposure to weather). Imagine how long it would last in a marine environment.

Last edited by Surfesq; 10-18-2006 at 05:16 AM.
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Old 10-21-2006
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Surfesq-

I hope your ports are bronze not brass. Brass de-zincifies rather quickly in a saltwater environment and leaves a pretty porous and weak copper sponge behind.

I'd second the 3M 4000 sealant. Silicone is a pretty useless material for much of what is needed on a sailboat, and should really be limited in its use. Regardless of what brand silicone you use, do not use any that smell like vinegar when they cure on a sailboat.
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Old 04-27-2007
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Every single window in my '80 Hunter 37 had HORRIBLE seals. You could tell they we're original and had never been replaced, as you had to crank the knobs down so tight that several had stripped out. I contacted the manufacturer and wasn't happy at the price they quoted for replacement gaskets. One day on a trip through Lowes, I happened by the weatherstripping section and low and behold, they have every kind of weatherstripping that i needed!! I think i payed (ballpark) $40 to re-seal 15 hatches. They are absolutely wonderful now, and you don't even have to turn the knobs one turn, just flip them up and you're in waterproof nirvana!
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  #17  
Old 04-28-2007
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Butyl

Another sealant/adhesive that is used for auto windscreen are the butyl-based products. Does anybody have any experience using them in a marine environment? Cheers, Jim
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Old 04-29-2007
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Jim, I don't think it is the sealant itself that really matters. Automobile windshields are "floated" on a bed of sealant, so the glass is free to move and expand without ever contacting a hard surrounding. When the bond is fresh, you can literally blow the glass out of the frame by slamming a door closed.

In a boat, you need more positive retention than that (even after the bond is formed) since the boat can go "poof" as it falls off a wave and the hull flexes. And, most glazing on boats is (from what I've seen) set improperly considering that the makers of the glazing say you MUST allow for expansion and contraction--you can't just bolt it down, or glue it tight into a frame.

But if you sandwich the glazing between an inner and outer frame, and place gaskets on the front and rear of the glazing (material almost insignificant as long as it can seal and flex) AND allow the expansion room around it, almost anything should work. Of course, using an inner and outer frame that way means you can't make pretty flush "Euro" portlights.

There's always a tradeoff between how much quality you want/need, what it is going to cost, and what the market is willing to pay for. Betcha the ports on a battleship don't leak like the ones on a sailboat.
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Old 04-29-2007
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Betcha most sailboats can't take the weight of the ports off of a battleship either...
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Old 05-02-2007
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Great advice, as I'm rebedding some ports this weekend. One question though is, what is the best "removing agent" to get rid of the old seals?

The fixed lights or deadlights, were ruined when I pulled them. Too expensive to replace this season, so I'm going to cut out some temporary ones out of Lexan...use 3M 4000 to seal them and hope for a 2 year fix.

Will that work ok?
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