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-   -   air conditioning (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/24668-air-conditioning.html)

kennya 11-03-2006 02:02 PM

air conditioning
 
I am looking at air conditioning my boat, the summer here are very hot and humid many 100 plus days I sort of like the Coleman SeaMach http://www.pplmotorhomes.com/parts/r...oners-info.pdf as a permanent installation 1300 BTU with a heat strip for winter., for about the same price as a carry on from West Marine. My concern is this unit is a roof mount @ 99 lbs. What will this do to my center of gravity and boat handling? I can already see a visibility problem while motoring. What other effect will the extra 100 lbs have?

sailingdog 11-03-2006 02:20 PM

There are other problems besides the lower stability, as it will shift the COG up and reduce overally stability of the boat, as it heels, the 100 lbs. of the AC unit essentially cancel out a part of the righting moment generated by your keel.

The biggest of these is the fact that the AC unit will be a weak point in heavy seas or in the case of a knockdown. If the AC unit shifts, breaks or falls out, it will allow a lot of water to come into the cabin, and if you're on a ballasted monohull, downflooding is a strong possibility.

Also, the unit is probably not designed to resist the corrosive effects of a marine environment. There is a good reason that WM sells carry on units, rather than permanent installations. Most people do not have a sufficiently large battery bank to support running an AC unit, except under shore power—so why carry the weight when you're sailing??

kennya 11-03-2006 02:31 PM

Thanks it was just a thought.

hellosailor 11-03-2006 03:48 PM

Kennya, you don't mention what size boat you have. Installing a 100# unit on deck is about the same thing as having as having one young teenager on deck.

But this unit would need a 20amp 110VAC power feed, making it impractical for a lot of sailors. Water-cooled AC units also are more efficient for permanent installation on a boat.

ExpressII 11-03-2006 04:01 PM

Hey Kennya

I wanted to do the same thing on Precision 28. I bought a regular 110 volt
room a/c and set in on the deck just forward of my cabin hatch. I then had a company make me a sort of tent out of sunbrella and clear vinyl that attaches to the front of the a/c and funnels the cold air into the cabin. I remove the a/c before taking the boat out and lock it up in my dockbox. If you want more info just e-mail me. Good sailing!

sailingdog 11-03-2006 04:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hellosailor
Kennya, you don't mention what size boat you have. Installing a 100# unit on deck is about the same thing as having as having one young teenager on deck.

But this unit would need a 20amp 110VAC power feed, making it impractical for a lot of sailors. Water-cooled AC units also are more efficient for permanent installation on a boat.

HS-

Unless the boat is really large, it is very unlikely that it will be able to support the electrical load required by the AC unit in question. Water cooled units are only more efficient in areas where the water is cold enough to cool the unit.

Cruisingdad 11-03-2006 04:36 PM

Kennya & all,

I am assuming you live in Oklahoma and may even keep your boat on Texoma?

Well, I would be very surprised if 1300 BTU is going to cool your boat. Maybe you just have a very small boat? I don' know. I have a 16000 & a 12000. The 16 really is almost enough... excpet on the hottest & coldest days (it is harder to heat then cool on a reverse cycle).

As far as the top mount unit, You might save a few bucks and try what I saw another guy try. Ok, now, this is reall-real-real red neck engineering, but:

THer is a guy on another dock that took a large home mount unit, built a wooden box around it for weather, left open the exhaust (hot side) side and ran house style ducting into the hatch from the cooling vents. The unit sits on the dock.

I am not neccessaril reccommending this, per se. I have actually thought about sending it into Americas Funniest Home Videos, but am afraid of death threats from the LCRN (Local Chapter of Red Necks). Still, it is a cheap and easy way to do it.

If you do want to go with a small water cooled unit, Mermaid makes one in very small BTU's and they are supposed to be easy to install. They look like they would be. Still, as has been pointed out, you will need a genny to run it away from dock. At dock, it is no problem, of course.

- CD

PS The water cooled units work very well, even in the tropics... I can tell you. It is not how cold the unit get that I have found is the limiting factor, it is how "hot" the deck is and how much of that is radiating down with full sun.

kennya 11-03-2006 05:22 PM

You are partly correct I am In Oklahoma, But on The Grand Lake of the Cherokees. My boat is a Spirit 28, with a full insolated headliner. I have taken a small 500 BTU window unit and just set in the companion way and cooled the boat. Not easy to get in or out of the cabin.

ebs001 11-04-2006 08:39 AM

Kennya, you keep dropping one of the zeros in your post. The Coleman Seamach is a 13,500 BTU unit and the window shaker you have now is a 5,000 BTU unit. According to the website you provided the SeaMach is made for the harsh marine environment and would certainly be large enough to cool your boat. Everyone uses a generator to cool their boat when away from the dock, so power is not an issue. The only problem in the above post that I think you will have is changing the centre of gravity and therefore your righting moment by mounting a 100LB unit on deck. It also will have to be well secured to accept the pounding it will take.

cardiacpaul 11-04-2006 10:04 AM

Dad,
I saw a "silver snake" ductwork job on a stinkpot @ grandpappys, and while it works like a charm, the Cuban nixxed the idea, something about, "Oh, hell no, thats too far out there"

I'm on texoma as well and on a 27 catalina, a 5k window unit in the companion way is sufficent, albeit quite redneck and rather unseemly to crawl over. The carry-on in the front hatch just doesn't cut it by itself @ the dock in August. Not to mention my back gets a workout carting them from the dockbox to the boat & back

On the 33, I need both and it takes a couple of hours to become cool(er)


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