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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #21  
Old 12-07-2006
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It is good to have eye splices at the boat end to allow best utilization of the available cleats/bitts.

It is possible to use smaller lines if you adopt Navy practice and "triple up" when the boat will be moored for a while. I think that a single, adequately sized rope is easier to handle.
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Sailormon6,

Amen.

Bill
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  #23  
Old 12-07-2006
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Sailaway, first, appologies for not being able to read your last post in total. Even IF I conceed your tying tight point of reducig the load on lines, (I'm not) but if I did, you would still be over looking wave action. There will alway be wave action (tital area or not) if your boat cannot rise and fall with the waves you will be putting significant stress on all points of your mooring, line, cleats, chocks, etc... that I'm guessing will be roughly equivilent to the bouyance factor of your boat. (hopefully significant). This isn't even including the possiblity of boarding waves sinking your boat if she cannot rise and fall with the wave action.
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Non-stretching polypropylene lines. I'm not familiar with those. All the polypro I've seen stretches only 20% less than nylon, although it has only 55% the strength of nylon.
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Sailaway-

Last I checked, Chevron doesn't have any sailboats in their fleet as a general rule. There is a significant difference in the practices of tying up a commercial freighter or oil tanker, from those used by non-commercial, significantly smaller sailboat owners. I wouldn't want any vessel massing over 100 tons to get any movement or inertia...

Also, the cleats on a large steel ship have significantly more strength than do the ones on most smaller sailboats, which are held largely in place by the strength of the laminate in which they are fastened. Shock loading large steel cleats that are welded in place is probably less of a problem than doing so on a GRP sailboat. Boat wakes are probably not an issue for a 10,000+ ton steel commercial ship, but are a significant factor for small sailboats.

Polypropylene is a horrible material to use for docklines, as it is very weak, and extremely susceptible to UV damage.
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If you see most boats over here actually have springs and rubber things (sorry I don't know the name in english) on the mooring ropes, to help absorb shock due to winds and current.

Here tying a boat with the rope tensile is a NO NO.
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Giu...the rubber things are called snubbers here. I saw the spring things in the caribe for the first time with chain running from one end to the dock and then rope to the boat from the other end. Didn't understand the need or purpose of the chain. Is that how it is done where you are?
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Old 12-08-2006
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On Aquila, we call it snubbage. And we like it. We have one of the least protected slips in the Bay, when the wind kicks up out of the south on a high tide, like it might in the next couple of days. The concern isn't the cleats on the boat, but more those on the 20-year-old dock. Either end cutting loose is not a good thing. On a 31,000 lb boat, we use 5/8" braided for the bow and stern lines, with snubbage, and have a mix of spring lines: two 3/4" and one 5/8". I think the that snubbage is unnecessary of the line run is reasonaly long and the line has some stretch. And, to be obvious, don't forget the chafe protection - I bet that cuts more boats loose than pulled cleats. To get back to the last post.... is that what the chain is for? Totally makes sense!
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Chain is good for chafe prevention, especially aroung pilings when you are expecting a good blow. In an ideal world you would splice and eye around a thimble to connect to chain with a shackle. Good sound storm tie.

On the 150ton yacht I work on we keep mooring lines pretty tight. No motion unchecked or undamped by the lines stretching. My little 6 ton boat is always tied with slack for all the above mentioned motions to be accomodated. The big boat uses nylon braidline for most tie ups and the storm lines are nylon three strand with eyes and thimble to attach to the chains. The little boat uses all 5/8 nylon braidline, doubled when it blows and snubbers on the primary set.

To answer the OP, if that's still necessary, use the 3/4". If you have trouble fitting that around the cleats on your boat, consider replacing them.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by camaraderie
Giu...the rubber things are called snubbers here. I saw the spring things in the caribe for the first time with chain running from one end to the dock and then rope to the boat from the other end. Didn't understand the need or purpose of the chain. Is that how it is done where you are?

Cam, over here we don't use the chain, its all rope, and the snubber and/or spring. I have never seen the chain istallation. Could it be to keep it snug with the chain's wieght??

The snuber/chain is only used on the bow to finger rope, and on the stern to finger rope. The springs and other cross ropes are straight but not too tight.
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