single side band radio - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #11  
Old 02-26-2007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 1,793
Thanks: 0
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Rep Power: 9
btrayfors will become famous soon enough btrayfors will become famous soon enough
Yes, they ARE different. You're talking apples and oranges and...well...footballs.

First, single-sideband (SSB) is a TYPE OF RADIO EMISSION, not a type of radio. Other types of emissions include FM (like the FM radios we're all familiar with), AM (like the AM broadcast radios we're long familiar with), CW (or Morse code), TTY (or data), etc.

What's confusing to many people is that in the marine world, the term "SSB" has come to mean a high-frequency (HF) transceiver type-approved for use in the marine services, and capable of SSB emissions.

In reality, lots of other radio services use SSB emissions. These include the amateur radio service where MOST voice communication on the high frequencies is via SSB, long-distance aircraft service, military and, yes, even Citizens' Band where SOME CB transceivers are capable of SSB emissions within the Citizens Band (27MHz).

So.....SSB is a TYPE OF EMISSION...not a type of radio.

The Cobra radios are basically designed for use on the 27MHz Citizen's Band. They are not designed for use in other radio services or on other bands, to my knowledge.

Modern amateur radios are very sophisticated and can be modified to work on the HF marine bands (i.e., 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 22 MHz bands), as well as the amateur radio bands. However, it is ILLEGAL to transmit on the marine bands with an amateur radio, except in a bonafide life-threatening emergency.

Marine radios, like the Icom M802 and the Furuno in the link above, are real marine-band HF radios. They are constructed to a higher standard, and meet higher limits of clean signal (spurious emissions) than do amateur radios. There are other differences as well, some of which account for the higher price of these radios.

The aforementioned prices are common, but not necessarily imperative, particularly if you're willing to do a bit of study and get a ham license (note that CW or code proficiency is NO LONGER REQUIRED...you just have to pass a written exam). For some insight into this, please see: http://64.70.221.24/DiscBoard/viewtopic.php?t=2264

Hope this clarifies things a bit.

Bill
WA6CCA
S/V Born Free

Last edited by btrayfors; 02-26-2007 at 04:04 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 02-26-2007
goose327's Avatar
2kt wind=trolling speed
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Sonora, Ca. USA
Posts: 370
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
goose327 is on a distinguished road
Yes Sir, it did, thank you.
I was into the whole CB thing years ago, so most of my experience has been 27Mhz radios.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 02-26-2007
camaraderie's Avatar
moderate?
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: East Coast
Posts: 13,878
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 14
camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
ModMMax....unless you are going further south than Georgetwn in the Bahamas you do NOT need anything bu a VHF. There are morning weather nets on the VHF in both the Abcos and the Exumas. You can also hear the forecasts your friend is recommending with a $150 Grundig type radio RECIEVER...do you NEED to transmit on SSB?? Finally...internet is available on all the islands and wifi is also widely available so you can get forecasts daily that way too. Don't waste your money if the Bahamas is the destination.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 02-26-2007
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Southern Oregon
Posts: 9
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Kengoose is on a distinguished road
SSB Radios

Great discussion and very timely for me.
I found 3 very informative locations on the web. 1. Yachtmaster Northwest in Seattle. 2. Don @ www.HFradio.com 3. Marine Amateur Radio; a United States Power Squadrons guide. After a lot of thought (rumination) I just purchased a ICOM 802 radio, ICOM 140 Antenna Tuner, 2 medium dynaplates as counterpoise, PactorIII modem and needed weatherfax software. I will next insulate my backstay and run all the needed cables etc. The cost is going to be at least 4K doing the work yourself. You also will need a general FCC ham license if you want to access the internet with the pactor modem, and at least a technician license to talk legally.

Installation involves drilling holes below the warerline to install the dynaplates, rerigging to insulate the antenna (new wire) on the back stay and running the needed cables to all of the components. I will be doing the work myself with help.

The best thing is that it will give me access to the world as I am cruising.

A standard Ham rig will not do the job in terms of its ability to deal with the wet and humid marine environment and does not access the needed marine bands (although many of them are out there having been modified and reprogrammed ilegally). The 802 has all the bells and whistles for a rather steep price. You can get less expensive ICOM marine radios (check on line at Westmarine. One of the real benefits of the 802 is the remote head as my nav station space is limited.

Ken
KE7GTL
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 02-26-2007
ModMMax's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 36
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
ModMMax is on a distinguished road
Thanks guys. I think I'll take your advice and try it with my current equipment before I take the SSB route. Learned alot today. Thanks again.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 02-26-2007
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
rsteinberg is on a distinguished road
You should seriously think baout getting a ham licence. There are several nets that you can participate in that link ham/sailors. AND... as of Friday, February 23rd, the morse code requirement has been dropped for all US ham licences. Now it's just written exams. You may also be able to get the marine SSB radios modified by the vendor to transmit on the ham bands if you can show a valid license.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 02-26-2007
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Southern Oregon
Posts: 9
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Kengoose is on a distinguished road
I just purchased my SSB radio, weatherfax, antenna tuner and PactorII modem set. To install it will entail drilling holes and mounting 2 dynaplates below the water line, cutting and insulating my backstay for the antenna, connecting the antenna tuner to the antenna and dynaplates, running all cables and fitting in the components in my small nav station. To use the SSB marine and some of the ham bands you will need at least a FCC technician license and to use the internet function a FCC General license. Installation is possible by the boat owner with help (hopefully I can do most of it myself).
Standard Ham radios are not appropriate for the wet and humid marine environment and as well do not have the needed marine bands and DSC function. Modification of a "shack" ham radio for marine bands is I believe illegal. I purchased the ICOM 802 for its remote head feature and the DSC option.
SSB and ham radios are not CB. You won't hear music. good old boy chatter or foul language on the SSB.
2 sources of info are 1. Yachtmasternorthwest in Seattle and www.hfradio.com in California. Radios are availiable from www.westmarine.com and other marine suppliers.

Ken
KE7GTL
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 02-26-2007
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Southern Oregon
Posts: 9
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Kengoose is on a distinguished road
sorry all

could not see my previous reply and did another as I thought it was lost in the ether. Where are my glasses?
Ken
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 02-26-2007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 1,793
Thanks: 0
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Rep Power: 9
btrayfors will become famous soon enough btrayfors will become famous soon enough
Ken,

You can delete either of the duplicates by going into EDIT mode.

Congratulations on your purchase.

Just a couple of notes about your post:

1. Experience over the past 50 years or so of ham radio use aboard cruising sailboats shows that they stand up very well to the marine environment, if you protect them from spray, immersion, excess heat, etc., just as you would any piece of electronic gear; and

2. You don't really need to drill holes in your bottom and install the ground plates. IMHO, they're really a waste of money, and really just function as a good DC ground while they're clean...which isn't very long. RF grounds are different from DC grounds, and can be as simple or complex as you wanna make them. See http://64.70.221.24/DiscBoard/viewtopic.php?t=1177

There's a lotta questionable advice floating around out there, some of it marginal and some just plain wrong. I hate to see a fellow ham bamboozled.

Hope the new install goes well.

73,

Bill
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 02-26-2007
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Southern Oregon
Posts: 9
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Kengoose is on a distinguished road
Bill

Thanks for the information. I have been talking, listening and trying to piece together all the varied ideas on this subject for months now. My decision to go with the dynaplates was based upon the experiences of cruisers I talked to and their suggestions, the suggestions of installers (who do have a monitary interest) and ICOM. The dynaplates are a small cost in the entire package although they do entail drilling more holes in the boat. I wish my boat had come with loads of copper mesh in the hull as I would have used that option.
The ICOM rep at the Seattle boat show stated that they make their marine radios to a higher standard per water etc. I am not sure that I believe that as they look the same from the outside 802/710 versus 718.

The discussion on the other forum details the kind of antenna I have used on land and how an emergency antenna can be rigged.

Muddlin along.

Ken
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
single Mom, single hander, single paycheck. GreenBoat Boat Review and Purchase Forum 61 11-23-2011 07:29 PM
Single handing Irwin32 Seamanship & Navigation 140 06-01-2011 02:26 PM
The Single Sideband Radio and the Cruising Sailor Sue & Larry Seamanship Articles 0 02-14-1999 07:00 PM
The Single Sideband Radio and the Cruising Sailor Sue & Larry Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 02-14-1999 07:00 PM
The Single Sideband Radio and the Cruising Sailor Sue & Larry Cruising Articles 0 02-14-1999 07:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:32 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012