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  #11  
Old 03-05-2007
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I'll weigh in. One of the reasons to use a seacock with a flange is the additional support if stepped on. I did mine with a block of wood with holes drilled and then three coats of polyurethane absorbed at the edges makes the wood like a peice of plastic. I then bed the whole thing in 5200 and cover the countersunk bolts if fiberglass and fair it. It helps if your hull is an inch thick in most places that a thru hull would be.
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5200 or 4200 seems sufficiently adhesive to Starboard backing plate in that application. No nut should be installed between the seacock flange and the plate. Instead, dryfit the thruhull fitting and mark for cutting. Before cutting, thread the nut all the way on, and after cutting "clean up" the threads at the site of the cut by unthreading the nut off the thruhull.
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Old 03-05-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by camaraderie
Dawg...right...actually I think mine are balsa or something like that...much lighter than pine.
I thought you were talking abou the through hull being screwed. I agree about the sea-**** flange to the starboard or wood backing plate...not into the hull. How do you affix starboard to the hull...I thought nothing like 5200 would stick to it?
You could glass it into place...but that's a bit overkill. I think that both 5200 and 4200 will stick to it...but I'd have to check compatibility... I would probably go with 4200 if it won't dissolve the starboard.

What I have been using myself is solid fiberglass held in place by a bed of thickened epoxy. I had some 1" thick fiberglass panels left over from something a friend of mine was doing...and just chopped it into 4"x4" squares and 4" wide strips...
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  #14  
Old 03-05-2007
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Fiberglass panels would work great if you got them. One of the advantages of wood is it can easily be shaped with a belt sander to match the curve of the hull.
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Old 03-05-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roywmoss
5200 or 4200 seems sufficiently adhesive to Starboard backing plate in that application. No nut should be installed between the seacock flange and the plate. Instead, dryfit the thruhull fitting and mark for cutting. Before cutting, thread the nut all the way on, and after cutting "clean up" the threads at the site of the cut by unthreading the nut off the thruhull.
So are you advocating using the valve AS the nut in the final installation? It seems that if there is a nut between the flange and the block of wood, it would make the screws a bit unstable.

Eric
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ereuter
So are you advocating using the valve AS the nut in the final installation? It seems that if there is a nut between the flange and the block of wood, it would make the screws a bit unstable.

Eric
Actually, he is recommending that you use the nut to figure out how short to cut the threaded shaft of the thruhull, and that you use the nut to clean up the threads after cutting the thru-hull shaft. He isn't saying you should use the nut and the seacock though.
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Right, but someone DID suggest using the nut and the seacock together in an earlier post, if I understood correctly.

This is all great info. Thanks for all the responses. I have a feeling that this is one of those jobs that is terrifying to someone who hasn't done it before, but isn't really a big deal.

I ordered all my parts today, so I'll probably get at it in a week or two if the weather warms up enough.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ereuter
Right, but someone DID suggest using the nut and the seacock together in an earlier post, if I understood correctly.

This is all great info. Thanks for all the responses. I have a feeling that this is one of those jobs that is terrifying to someone who hasn't done it before, but isn't really a big deal.

I ordered all my parts today, so I'll probably get at it in a week or two if the weather warms up enough.
Yes that was me... I generally have a routed out hole in the fiberglass backing block, so the nut can be seated and not interfere with the seacock sitting on the block. The fiberglass blocks I use are pretty thick... about and 1" or so.. I probably should have clarified that earlier... if you don't have a routed out block to accept the nut and let the flange sit flush... don't use it...
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Old 05-05-2007
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I finally had a chance to pull my old thru-hulls out today. I was surprised to fine that the hole in the hull is about 1/4" larger in diameter than the fitting. Is this normal? Seems like a lot of space to fill with sealant.

I'm going to pick up some starboard in the morning, and hope to get the new thru-hulls and seacocks installed tomorrow.

Thanks,
Eric

Last edited by ereuter; 05-05-2007 at 11:02 PM.
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Old 05-06-2007
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That hole seems to be oversized from what I would have expected. Does the outer flange of the thru-hull seat properly and give you sufficient surface contact. It might be worthwhile to fill the hole with thickened epoxy and then drill out a proper sized hole in the center of it. At least, that would be what I would do.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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