Is anyone familiar with this epoxy product? - SailNet Community

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Old 03-05-2007
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Is anyone familiar with this epoxy product?

http://www.epoxyproducts.com/barrier4u.html

It seems that almost everyone uses Interprotect 2000 or 3000, but I ran across this link, and I can't tell if this makes sense, or is just some manufacturer with an oddball agenda. I had the hull on my 1978 O'Day 32' CC down to gelcoat last fall, and in April I'll barrier-coat and antifoul the bottom. A lot of what he says SEEMS to make sense, but it could be snake oil. Any opinions? Thanks in advance.
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Old 03-05-2007
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So far no blisters with 2 haul outs using Interprotect 2000.
pigslo
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Old 03-05-2007
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I did read the link you posted, and I'm not sure if it was me, but at times it seemed like double speak. On the same subject, I attended a class given by Mas Epoxies and I walked away a firm believer. As I understand it, you would epoxy the bottom and then bottom paint over it. Removing the old paint as much as possble is also a good idea.
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Old 03-05-2007
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"SPECIAL NOTE: solvent free epoxies (0% VOC) are generally considered to be self primering, (no primers needed). However,..."

Took this off the web link above - I'd be pretty skeptical of anyone/ any company describing their product in such highly technical terms...
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Old 03-06-2007
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Also, gotta love their disclaimer, from the contact page...

Quote:
APPLICATION/SUITABILITY DISCLAIMER. Any suggestions/procedures offered by Progressive Epoxy Polymers, Inc. are given AS-IS without any warranty and in no way expand the rights under which you have, or will purchase, this product or related products. Your use of any of these suggestions/procedures is at your sole cost and risk. In no event shall Seller be liable to you for CONSEQUENTIAL OR INCIDENTAL damages. You must make an independent determination whether to follow any or all of the above items based upon the numerous application variables at hand. Consult Seller Warranty Disclaimer and Return Policy document for additional notifications.


Emphasis added...
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Old 03-07-2007
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MAS Epoxies

Several of you have responded with positive feedback about the MAS Epoxies barrier-coat. Anybody able to elaborate about ease/difficulty of use, effectiveness, etc. ? Does it offer any signifigant advantages over Interprotect 2000/3000?
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Old 03-07-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jknappsax
Several of you have responded with positive feedback about the MAS Epoxies barrier-coat. Anybody able to elaborate about ease/difficulty of use, effectiveness, etc. ? Does it offer any signifigant advantages over Interprotect 2000/3000?
I'm one of the MAS guys, but I really can't answer your question about advantages over Interprotect. Seems to me that any of the barrier coat products or approaches do the job and do it well. I primarily chose epoxy because I had worked with it before so knew what I was getting into. I went with MAS because a friend who at the time owned his own wood working shop, and also taught making kayaks and such from kits, recommended it.

As far as ease of use, epoxy is rather idiot proof if you know how to mix. MAS is a 2-1 ratio of resin to hardner, so it was easy to mix a good amount to roll onto the bottom. I could just pour into a marked container at the 2-1 ratio and not have to hit a pump a thousand times a day. MAS also was low blush (they since have come out with no blush at all formulas), and no sanding if you applied the next coat when the previous coat could just be dented with a thumbnail. It's been 2 years and the bottom still looks great.
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Old 03-09-2007
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Thanks for the opinions!

It looks like the blushless MAS has the advantage of not having to sand blush off of each coat before recoating, and probably will make the going quicker and easier. If any of you have contrary opinions, please let me know, as I want to get a complete picture, both pro and con. Thanks.
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Old 09-04-2007
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I read that link info too, several times, and got confused as a result. I can read IRS code and understand it but could not decide which product to use on my Cheoy Lee 36. However, I did come away with the understanding that "blush" does not have to be sanded but is washed off instead.

My sense is that the vendor really does know his products but could use a little work with marketing and promotional writing. I think he probably has a pretty good product and a decent price but the web site kind of puts a reader ill at ease.

So, I think it will be MAS expoxy for my rig, probably later this week or early next week if I can get the bottom ready. There is so much pox from a previous barrier coat that was poorly applied that I will sand as much will come away and then fair the worst of it with expoxy before rolling on the final shield.

Hope you job comes out alright if it has not already been completed.

Bob in Rockport, MA
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Old 09-05-2007
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I put on my bottom 4 coats of epoxy, the first one or two coats being thickened epoxy. I did get some ruff spots using the thicken epoxy. This happened when I first started using the foam roller with the thicken epoxy. I ended up using 50 grit sandpaper on a belt sander and used 9 belts to knock down the high spots. So I will say that the mas epoxy is very hard. The bottom prior to painting looked like a sheet of glass. I also epoxy coated my rudder.
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