teak decks... pros and cons - Page 2 - SailNet Community

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  #11  
Old 04-07-2007
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I'll take Treadmaster or Dec-o-lay or even sand mixed in Awlgrip, thanks. As I said, I love the look of teak decks, but the caulking and filling and sanding and varnishing and the ten thousand screws in my deck just don't appeal much. Nor, it must be said, does having all that weight topside, a weight only increased by the insulation and headliner necessary to stave off the amount of heat a teak deck can absorb in the tropics. Finally, the through-bolts for deck gear have to be longer and thus have more leverage as they traverse several layers of dissimilar materials (mounting pad, teak deck, fibreglass structural deck, core material, inner FG skin) to whatever kind of backing plate is going to be under the deck but over the insulation, the furring strips and the headliner.

Re: the young teak. This implies that the teak pieces would be smaller or shorter, meaning more scarfing together, more drilling and screwing and plugging and more potential points of failure. Why not screw a jigsaw puzzle of Starboard into your deck instead?

I approve of plastic scrimshaw, on the other hand. (grin)
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Old 04-07-2007
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V- Understood...was just commenting on the teak rainforest issue.
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Old 04-07-2007
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I don't have a teak deck (but can appreciating them), but one quick comment is to agree with camaraderie - much "wild" teak has been milled although the logs that are milled are numbered and registered. There is quite a trade in black market teak (due to the extremely high value of teak) which continues with pressure from outsive influences such as China. The good news is that most commercially available teak is farmed and is also used to replant clear-cut rain forest and to provide a cash crop. In my woodworking semi-business, I sometimes buy plantation teak. It's not nearly as expensive as the obscenely-priced stuff at West.
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Old 04-07-2007
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Valiente-

One word of warning on the sand in paint as non-skid. If you're going to do that, use beach or river sand rather than construction-grade sand. Beach and river sand have rounded edges, construction grade sand is sharp, razor edged crystals, or that is how it will feel when you slide across it... It is very similar to sliding across sandpaper... no fun at all.
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I own a 47 foot sailboat that I have owned since new. It has a sprung deck that I used all sorts of teak cleaners on -- I learned a valuable lesson about keeping the teak blond. That is, at about 18 years after I bought the boat, I am the only person in my area of south Texas that has personally replaced a teak deck. The bungs wouldn't stop falling out. My original deck was screwed down. When I removed it there was a fair amount of core rot but the repair was easy since there was no need to make a pretty cosmetic repair. We replaced the entire deck with 9/16ths teack that is in 1 and 1/4 wide planks. We glued the new deck down and caulked with Teak Decking Systems Caulk. Except for a few spots where the boats meet the king plank the deck has been maintainence free for 6 years. It has been a good decision for me to replace the deck because all of the boats that had the teak removed and replaced with non skid look like that -- to me it is never cosmetically right. Frankly, it may save a lot of money to use deck paint but you are going to repaint the deck one extra time before the teak needs to be replaced again. Also, if life was about dollars it never made sense to buy the boat to begin with as Sailtime is the best deal on the planet.
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Old 04-08-2007
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docketone,

If we were ever faced with a similar decision as yours, I would opt for replacing my teak decks with teak as well - without hesitation. Choosing a synthetic material, or applying non-skid, is analogous to stripping the redwood shingles off my house and replacing them with cheap, vinyl siding . . . never happen in my lifetime.

I would guess a common reactiion with owners of new or newer boats, commissioned with teak decks, is to make every attempt to preserve that new blonde look. You learned the hard way that unless the natural grey characteristics of a teak deck are accepted, it's expected life span will be shortened by chemicals and abrasive brushing.
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Old 04-08-2007
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As a builder, I think the easiest comparison to houses would be a slate roof. They last over 40 years and with minor inspection and maintenance they are easily maintained. If, however, you are the one that has to replace that roof at the end of it's life, or if it suffered from a previous owner's neglect, the cost to remove or replace is tremendous. As Cam points out, we have harvested all the old growth timber, including teak and mahogany (which today is probably an 8" tree cut in Malaysia). A 20 year old boat with teak decks - no way. I own Bristols because I love and pay for the exterior varnish, but teak decks are over the top for me. By the Bristol (the poor man's Hinckley) and spend your money on varnish.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
Valiente-

One word of warning on the sand in paint as non-skid. If you're going to do that, use beach or river sand rather than construction-grade sand. Beach and river sand have rounded edges, construction grade sand is sharp, razor edged crystals, or that is how it will feel when you slide across it... It is very similar to sliding across sandpaper... no fun at all.
I actually have Dec-O-Lay non-skid (think a rolled-on Treadmaster or a sandy sort of truck-bed coating: DECOLAY) on my steel deck and wouldn't likely go for the sand on the steel...but would consider it for fiberglass. I had heard about the river/beach vs. construction sand issue...thanks. I have also heard that people have tried such substances as ground walnut shells and ground apricot pits with some success.

Whether this success is real or not, I couldn't say.
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The weirdest way of making a non-skid surface I've heard of is by sprinkling the wet painted surface with sugar, and letting it set into the surface. Then, after the paint has dried, washing the deck with water... and getting rid of the sugar. It supposedly leaves little holes where the grains settled, and acts as a non-skid surface. The one major downside to it that I've been told about is that the little craters tend to collect dirt.
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Old 04-09-2007
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