Deck repairs: waterproofing stachion mounting holes - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #1  
Old 04-09-2007
Paysay's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 59
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Paysay is on a distinguished road
Deck repairs: waterproofing stachion mounting holes

My question regards waterproofing through-deck bolt holes that penetrate a balsa core. I've read and followed instructions found at numerous sources including old postings here in Sailnet that explain how to waterproof a balsa deck core around the bolt holes by reeming out the core around the bolt hole then filling the hole with thickened epoxy and reboring the hole through the cured epoxy. My question is "Why thicken the epoxy"? The deck at these locations is under compression load and I doubt that coloidal silica (sp?) helps improve the compression strength of epoxy. What am I missing? In fact, I did use unthickened epoxy on a couple of bolt holes on my own deck this past fall with good results (so long as I adaquately sealed the bottom of the hole). I did have to top off the epoxy as it soaked into the core, but that seems like a good thing.

I have a good number of holes that have not yet been waterproofed. how should I proceed next fall?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 04-09-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Actually, the thickening agents in epoxy, whether it is colloidial silica or some other high-density filler, serve two purposes when doing this type of repair. First, they thicken the epoxy to help it stay where you put it, instead of dribbling out—now this isn't so important when the hole is on a deck, but if the hole were on the side of the boat, it would make a big difference. Second, they do add quite a lot of compressive strength to the epoxy resin.

For instance... imagine a bowl of jello. That's epoxy.. push your palm down into it... not too hard to do is it. Now imagine the same bowl filled with jello that is filled with peanuts. Now try and push your hand through the jello... Now, do you think it is easier or harder to do than when it was just plain Jello???

You really should be using thickened epoxy for potting the holes. Almost all of the books and most of the people who write about it, including the people here on Sailnet, say use thickened epoxy for a reason.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 04-09-2007
Freesail99's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,507
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Freesail99 will become famous soon enough
Send a message via Yahoo to Freesail99
To re set the deck fittings themselves I would use sikaflex 291 which flexs much more then 4200 with the same holding power.
__________________
S/V Scheherazade
-----------------------
I had a dream, I was sailing, I was happy, I was even smiling. Then I looked down and saw that I was on a multi-hull and woke up suddenly in a cold sweat.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 04-09-2007
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 37
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
shantijwk is on a distinguished road
Deck repairs

How does Sikaflex 291 compare with boat life caulk as a hardware bedding material?
I agree with the additive to thicken the epoxy. In a bind I have used the contents of my beltsander dust bag.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 04-09-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Sikaflex 291 and 3M 4200 are both polyureathane-based sealants. BoatLife LifeCalk is a polysulfide based sealant. Polysulfides tend to be a bit more reactive and while good for bedding hardware, will tend to attack plastics, like ABS, Lexan and Acrylic/Plexiglass.

I would say that BoatLife LifeCalk is slightly better for bedding deck hardware, than either 3M 4200 or SikaFlex 291, especially if they're bonding to teak, as the polysulfide tends to grip oily woods much better.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 04-09-2007
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 37
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
shantijwk is on a distinguished road
Thanks Sailingdog
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 04-09-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
De nada Shantijwk. What kind of boat do you have?
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 04-09-2007
ASA and PSIA Instructor
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 3,449
Thanks: 6
Thanked 17 Times in 17 Posts
Rep Power: 15
sailingfool will become famous soon enough
Epoxy Paste

The straight epoxy is more subject to chipping or cracking when you drill it with a large bit, the paste drills cleanly and wont chip.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 04-09-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingfool
The straight epoxy is more subject to chipping or cracking when you drill it with a large bit, the paste drills cleanly and wont chip.
That's true... thickened epoxy does drill more cleanly... Hmm.. forgot about that.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 04-23-2007
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 11
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
geedunk is on a distinguished road
I am replacing the "wench pads" on my '80 Hunter 30' -naturally the 1" teak does not conform to the fiberglass hull where the bimini and wenches mount-question: do i need 2 use a special sealant or will silicone augmented latex sealant suffice for this application? Also, the wench bolts r waay too long and interfere with headroom in the qt. berth--is there a reason they r so long--as i plan to cut them to fit the nylok nuts closer? Thanx.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Techniques for Removing Teak Decks Sue & Larry Buying a Boat Articles 0 11-24-2003 07:00 PM
Drilling and Filling Holes in Your Boat Sue & Larry Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 03-11-2003 07:00 PM
Mounting Deck Hardware Tom Wood Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 06-25-2002 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:00 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.